The Ultimate 80 Series Parts Discontinued Thread

Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Messages
586
Location
Toronto, NSW, Australia
Some of the RHD-specific parts are getting very difficult to find now. Luckily there is a huge 4wd wrecking market here in Australia but most RHD-specific parts are made in much small quantities than LHD except where the parts are also country/market specific just not LHD vs RHD.
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2019
Messages
20
Location
Dallas, Texas
This is kind of a long thread but generally speaking are people sole out of luck with the parts that are discontinued in this thread? Or are there decent aftermarket options for them? For instance, first post says: “16400-61240” - Radiator is discontinued, but you can find them on eBay for about $300.

Because if major parts are impossible to find after 20-25 years, and a crucial part is impossible to find, the car can basically become useless.

Just wondering as I’m looking at the hundy/LX470 series which with the last ones being made in 2007, makes them 12 years old now, so another 12 years or so before parts are totally discontinued or extremely difficult to find?
 

scottryana

 
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2004
Messages
10,162
Location
Salt Lake City, UT
There is no guarantee how long replacement parts will be available. There are parts that are no longer available for the 100 series and yet there are still some parts available from Toyota for the 40 series. There are people that are watching trends and buying and stockpiling the common failure parts. Which is not a bad habit to do if you’re driving a truck 2 decades old.

My suggestion would be to buy the newest lowest mileage 100 series you can find. Read the threads and find the common failure points that would leave you stranded and order those parts and put them in the garage.


This is kind of a long thread but generally speaking are people sole out of luck with the parts that are discontinued in this thread? Or are there decent aftermarket options for them? For instance, first post says: “16400-61240” - Radiator is discontinued, but you can find them on eBay for about $300.

Because if major parts are impossible to find after 20-25 years, and a crucial part is impossible to find, the car can basically become useless.

Just wondering as I’m looking at the hundy/LX470 series which with the last ones being made in 2007, makes them 12 years old now, so another 12 years or so before parts are totally discontinued or extremely difficult to find?
 

beno

Gihee Arakawa
Moderator
Supporting Vendor
GOLD Star
 
Joined
Aug 28, 2004
Messages
25,539
Location
Woodstock, NY, USA
There needs to be some clarification here to what's being said.

There are a number of factors that come into play in the discontinuation of a part with the biggest one being demand.

Let's remember that Toyota is in the business of making money, and so are Toyota's suppliers (Tier 1 companies on down). If they are not making money on the sale of a part (it's "movement") then Toyota discontinues it-- regardless of what vehicle it's for.

So an air intake hose (17881-66060 or 17881-66080) for example, has a much better chance of being available for a longer period of time than say the 22250-66050 MAF for the 1FZ because of the following criteria:

  1. Cost to manufacture: (molded rubber hose is imminently cheaper than an electro-mechanical sensor)
  2. Necessity to manufacture (10 year rule for OEMs)
  3. Demand (rubber deteriorates faster than electro-mechanical components)
  4. Manufacturing requirements of said parts (rubber vs. an integrated electro-mechanical sensor)
As such, there are plenty of rubber hoses sitting on shelves in North American parts depots while there are currently 0 MAF's in North American supply since I just bought the last three in stock. :)

That said, there are certain things to remember as well...

The 80 series was a "world" vehicle vs. a region-specific/market-specific vehicle. While it's manufacture was discontinued in 1997 for most markets, other markets continued to receive the 80 series in CKD form (Complete Knock Down Kit)-- basically a parts car assembled in a regional manufacturing facility with a certain % of parts locally procured. This was the case for the 80 series manufacture in Venezuela.

So, ostensibly the last year of manufacture for the 80 series was 2005 and the last year of manufacture for the 1FZ engine family was actually 2009 (FZJ7x iterations).

2009 was ten years ago.

We will see a rapid reduction in both 80 series parts and more specifically 1FZ engine series parts moving forward as the normal 10 year parts production requirement is now over for this engine.

Of course, the aftermarket can step-in and provide replacements that are generally manufactured for a fraction of the OEM part and are, unfortunately, also of much less quality. And this is for most things, not ALL things-- there has to be a market.
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2019
Messages
20
Location
Dallas, Texas
There needs to be some clarification here to what's being said.

There are a number of factors that come into play in the discontinuation of a part with the biggest one being demand.

Let's remember that Toyota is in the business of making money, and so are Toyota's suppliers (Tier 1 companies on down). If they are not making money on the sale of a part (it's "movement") then Toyota discontinues it-- regardless of what vehicle it's for.

So an air intake hose (17881-66060 or 17881-66080) for example, has a much better chance of being available for a longer period of time than say the 22250-66050 MAF for the 1FZ because of the following criteria:

  1. Cost to manufacture: (molded rubber hose is imminently cheaper than an electro-mechanical sensor)
  2. Necessity to manufacture (10 year rule for OEMs)
  3. Demand (rubber deteriorates faster than electro-mechanical components)
  4. Manufacturing requirements of said parts (rubber vs. an integrated electro-mechanical sensor)
As such, there are plenty of rubber hoses sitting on shelves in North American parts depots while there are currently 0 MAF's in North American supply since I just bought the last three in stock. :)

That said, there are certain things to remember as well...

The 80 series was a "world" vehicle vs. a region-specific/market-specific vehicle. While it's manufacture was discontinued in 1997 for most markets, other markets continued to receive the 80 series in CKD form (Complete Knock Down Kit)-- basically a parts car assembled in a regional manufacturing facility with a certain % of parts locally procured. This was the case for the 80 series manufacture in Venezuela.

So, ostensibly the last year of manufacture for the 80 series was 2005 and the last year of manufacture for the 1FZ engine family was actually 2009 (FZJ7x iterations).

2009 was ten years ago.

We will see a rapid reduction in both 80 series parts and more specifically 1FZ engine series parts moving forward as the normal 10 year parts production requirement is now over for this engine.

Of course, the aftermarket can step-in and provide replacements that are generally manufactured for a fraction of the OEM part and are, unfortunately, also of much less quality. And this is for most things, not ALL things-- there has to be a market.
So as an example say the MAF (what’s this part for?) I’m seeing MAF (22250-66050) on eBay for about $100-$200 used and $850 brand new. What’s the ideal price for this part? And are there any aftermarkets?

Edit: I’m also seeing it available on random websites for about $750. Seems to be available but the part seems to cost as much as the car?
 

CYKBC

SILVER Star
Joined
Feb 27, 2018
Messages
678
Location
LA County
So as an example say the MAF (what’s this part for?) I’m seeing MAF (22250-66050) on eBay for about $100-$200 used and $850 brand new. What’s the ideal price for this part? And are there any aftermarkets?

Edit: I’m also seeing it available on random websites for about $750. Seems to be available but the part seems to cost as much as the car?
I usually shop parts at local to me Norwalk Toyota and they also list the MAF at $750+. i think there was a def price jump as of late.

I also just checked inventory at ama and they have a few to sell out of UAE and jpn.

1915988


you could have the cleanest, most well maintained 80 on ih8, but if this thing fails, you own a large paper weight until replaced with one that works.
 

beno

Gihee Arakawa
Moderator
Supporting Vendor
GOLD Star
 
Joined
Aug 28, 2004
Messages
25,539
Location
Woodstock, NY, USA
So as an example say the MAF (what’s this part for?) I’m seeing maf (22250-66050) on eBay for about $100-$200 used and $850 brand new. What’s the ideal price for this part? And are there any aftermarkets?

MAF= Mass Air Flow meter. A reasonably important piece to making your engine run.

There is no "ideal" price for any part. Part pricing is based on thousands of possible factors when considering the grand scheme of economies of scale, manufacturing operations, supply and demand, etc. We are getting into global manufacturing economics here and I know of exactly one other person in the Land Cruiser world who I can sit and have a conversation like this about part numbers. :lol:

In any event, for Toyota new OEM parts, there is a MSRP set by Toyota for each country/region that the part is sold in. In the US market if you went to get the part from a Toyota dealer, the MSRP is $1112.77. A dealer can sell it for whatever price they want or whatever a specific market will bear. Toyota makes no rules as to what price a dealer has to sell a part at. There is of course a "cost" at which the dealer will buy the part from Toyota. Generally speaking, one doesn't sell a part for less than it costs.

For used parts, it's worth whatever someone is willing to pay for said part. Nothing more, nothing less.

For aftermarket parts, the manufacturer would set a price from $0 to whatever they feel it is worth to sell it at and what the market will bear.

Does that clarify things for you?
 

beno

Gihee Arakawa
Moderator
Supporting Vendor
GOLD Star
 
Joined
Aug 28, 2004
Messages
25,539
Location
Woodstock, NY, USA
I usually shop parts at Norwalk Toyota and they also list the MAF at $750+. i think there was a def price jump as of late.

I also just checked inventory at ama and they have a few to sell out of UAE and jpn.

View attachment 1915988
Trust me. There are currently 0 left in the US and 0 left in the UAE as well.

Also, those inventories are very elastic and not real time. Not even close to real time. They are "possible" suppliers.
 

CYKBC

SILVER Star
Joined
Feb 27, 2018
Messages
678
Location
LA County
Trust me. There are currently 0 left in the US and 0 left in the UAE as well.

Also, those inventories are very elastic and not real time. Not even close to real time. They are "possible" suppliers.
but it's not NLA, correct? thanks, beno.
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2019
Messages
20
Location
Dallas, Texas
MAF= Mass Air Flow meter. A reasonably important piece to making your engine run.

There is no "ideal" price for any part. Part pricing is based on thousands of possible factors when considering the grand scheme of economies of scale, manufacturing operations, supply and demand, etc. We are getting into global manufacturing economics here and I know of exactly one other person in the Land Cruiser world who I can sit and have a conversation like this about part numbers. :lol:

In any event, for Toyota new OEM parts, there is a MSRP set by Toyota for each country/region that the part is sold in. In the US market if you went to get the part from a Toyota dealer, the MSRP is $1112.77. A dealer can sell it for whatever price they want or whatever a specific market will bear. Toyota makes no rules as to what price a dealer has to sell a part at. There is of course a "cost" at which the dealer will buy the part from Toyota. Generally speaking, one doesn't sell a part for less than it costs.

For used parts, it's worth whatever someone is willing to pay for said part. Nothing more, nothing less.

For aftermarket parts, the manufacturer would set a price from $0 to whatever they feel it is worth to sell it at and what the market will bear.

Does that clarify things for you?
It does but I’m saying that a $800 part new for an suv that you can buy used for about $3000 decreases the financial incentive in purchasing said suv, no? Ie the hidden costs make your cheap early 90s suv more expensive than you think.

Also in your opinion for the 100 series/lx470 series since the last ones produced were in 2007 in the US, when do you roughly project parts to become scarce? Is it around the 10,20,25,30 year mark?
 
Last edited:

beno

Gihee Arakawa
Moderator
Supporting Vendor
GOLD Star
 
Joined
Aug 28, 2004
Messages
25,539
Location
Woodstock, NY, USA
It does but I’m saying that a $800 part new for an suv that you can buy used for about $3000 becomes a costly endeavor, no?

Also in your opinion for the 100 series/lx470 series since the last ones produced were in 2007 in the US, when do you roughly project parts to become scarce? Is it around the 10,20,25,30 year mark?
Everything having to do with OEM Toyota parts and Land Cruisers is costly. Make sure to wrap your head around that as well. The cost of ownership of a Land Cruiser gets MORE expensive the older it gets, not cheaper.

My opinion? Not worth the paper it's written on.
 

thatcabledude

SILVER Star
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Messages
3,032
Location
Walton Co, FL
It does but I’m saying that a $800 part new for an suv that you can buy used for about $3000 decreases the financial incentive in purchasing said suv, no? Ie the hidden costs make your cheap early 90s suv more expensive than you think.
One shouldn't buy Land Cruiser for any other incentive other than to own Land Cruiser.

The price of available parts and/or a growing NLA part list should be irrelevant.
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2019
Messages
20
Location
Dallas, Texas
One shouldn't buy Land Cruiser for any other incentive other than to own Land Cruiser.

The price of available parts and/or a growing NLA part list should be irrelevant.
Disagree - that’s cult belief but some newer models do make for good investments compared to American brands, high resale value, ofroading, quality of ride, etc. A 1998 land cruiser is probably going to be cheaper in the long run than say an 80 series simply
Bc parts will be more abundant for longer and lower mileage. In other words an 80 series lc might be cheap upfront but cost you more long term that it may not be as good as a deal as one would think.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 19, 2011
Messages
190
Location
Auckland, New Zealand
@beno I don't want to clog up this thread but a question I've always wondered.

It seems quite amazing to me the sheer number of parts for all cruisers still available from Toyota - I remember on for my 40 being able to get wheel cylinders for all sides for like NZ$20.

So to my question - do you know how Toyota balances their supply chain? Is there a magical warehouse somewhere full of all sorts of goodies? Did they make a giant run of parts during a vehicle's production run and when they're gone they're gone? Or are they constantly making parts (even for comparatively ancient vehicles) based on some sort of forecast?
 

beno

Gihee Arakawa
Moderator
Supporting Vendor
GOLD Star
 
Joined
Aug 28, 2004
Messages
25,539
Location
Woodstock, NY, USA
Disagree - that’s cult belief but some newer models do make for good investments compared to American brands, high resale value, offlanding, quality of ride, etc. A 1998 land cruiser is probably going to be cheaper in the long run than say an 80 series simply
Bc parts will be more abundant for longer and lower mileage. In other words an 80 series lc might be cheap upfront but cost you more long term that it may not be as good as a deal as one would think.
This statement obviously shows you don't know Land Cruisers. I would HIGHLY recommend detailed research on both series platforms before making assumptions and judgements of this kind.
 

beno

Gihee Arakawa
Moderator
Supporting Vendor
GOLD Star
 
Joined
Aug 28, 2004
Messages
25,539
Location
Woodstock, NY, USA
@beno I don't want to clog up this thread but a question I've always wondered.

It seems quite amazing to me the sheer number of parts for all cruisers still available from Toyota - I remember on for my 40 being able to get wheel cylinders for all sides for like NZ$20.

So to my question - do you know how Toyota balances their supply chain? Is there a magical warehouse somewhere full of all sorts of goodies? Did they make a giant run of parts during a vehicle's production run and when they're gone they're gone? Or are they constantly making parts (even for comparatively ancient vehicles) based on some sort of forecast?
Well, my favorite topic: Toyota supply chain management. :lol: ☠

I could write a book (well, I kind of am on the topic).

If you really are interested in discussing, feel free to send me an email and I can lay it all out for you in simple outline form. It's not really germane to this thread because no one else would give a sheeeeeeeit.
 
Top Bottom