Building a new house and shop

Discussion in 'Workshop and Home Improvement' started by 1911, Oct 29, 2016.

  1. Rugy

    Rugy

    Messages:
    312
    Likes Received:
    127
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2010
    Location:
    North Vancouver, BC
    Are they spraying on a damproofing or applying a 60mil waterproofing membrane onto the concrete ?
    If so is the new coating bonding to the original coating ?
    Torch on non granular membrane meaning a base sheet as an option.
    Protecto wrap peel and stick has worked very effectively for me on some situations.
    Another option might be to "shingle wrap " some delta drain mat, then some birds eye gravel on top of the drain mat. This will protect the membrane during the back fill.
    Extra insurance so you can sleep at night.
    Chasing leaks is no fun.............fingers crossed that they get it for you.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2018
    1911 likes this.
  2. 1911

    1911 chupacabra

    Messages:
    4,991
    Media:
    187
    Albums:
    4
    Likes Received:
    3,790
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Location:
    Parker County, Texas
    Thanks for the suggestions and input.

    They're using a polymer-modified asphalt product made by Epro, the best they have found they say in 35 years of building these kinds of houses. It can be sprayed or brushed on; the minimum coast thickness is 60 mil. It is supposed to bond to itself (previous coatings). We will then lay 20'-wide rolls of 10 mil poly sheeting over that, shingling it from the valleys between the domes to the tops of the domes, then back fill on top of that. After we get the back fill level between all the domes, and 1' over the dome peaks, we will put down a layer of expanded polystyrene sheet insulation and another layer of poly sheeting on top of that, then complete the backfill.
     
    waiting for time likes this.
  3. Rugy

    Rugy

    Messages:
    312
    Likes Received:
    127
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2010
    Location:
    North Vancouver, BC
    Epro is a great product, that is what we use as a base for waterproofing below grade for foundations.
    It gets sprayed on by the installer/applicator. Never used roll on in our projects.
    My worry with the 10Mil poly would be a small rock or something sharp that gets to puncture the poly in the back fill process.
    It's thick poly but who ever is doing the back fill must pay super special attention to soil being placed on the poly.
    That is why we use the delta drain mat.
    Remember that the fill will settle unless you do compaction.
    When you have back filled with the 1' of fill try to create some slope so that poly would shed water.
    Would use some birds eye gravel 3-4 inches on top of the poly so it would become free draining.
    Then 20' wide commercial filter cloth then the soil.
    Went trough my Fine Home Building magazines . Issue No 2 April May 1981 (yes I still have the magazines) there is a good article
    on waterproofing Earth Sheltered Houses by Charles A Lane. Little dated but all the principals are still relevant today. Its a good read.
    Can take pictures and forward if you like.
    Hope that helps.
     
  4. 1911

    1911 chupacabra

    Messages:
    4,991
    Media:
    187
    Albums:
    4
    Likes Received:
    3,790
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Location:
    Parker County, Texas
    Thanks Rugy. We will make a slope on the back side to drain water away from the house. Also putting another french drain all along inside the front parapet wall to move water away from the front of the back fill. We are also using a rotating drum sieve to screen-out rocks from the soil, so the first layers over the poly sheeting will not have rocks to punch through it. The gravel and the filter cloth are good ideas too, will try to incorporate those if we can afford it.
     
  5. waiting for time

    waiting for time

    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes Received:
    2,201
    Joined:
    May 25, 2010
    Location:
    The low country above sea level
    Looking forward to see the next fase of this build.
     
    1911 likes this.
  6. mdsims

    mdsims

    Messages:
    813
    Likes Received:
    446
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2013
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    Where can we donate? I want to see this thing accomplished quickly!
     
    1911 likes this.
  7. 1911

    1911 chupacabra

    Messages:
    4,991
    Media:
    187
    Albums:
    4
    Likes Received:
    3,790
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Location:
    Parker County, Texas
    :smokin:

    Thanks for the thought! Unfortunately, it needs more than a few thousand here and there to finish - I am working on building my business back up to generate some more income, but it is a slower process now than in years previous. Will be dipping into my retirement funds for some of it too, just can't do too much of that in a single year because it increases my tax bracket.

    The builder will be back next week to spray another coat of waterproofing; hopefully we can continue back filling soon after.
     
  8. 1911

    1911 chupacabra

    Messages:
    4,991
    Media:
    187
    Albums:
    4
    Likes Received:
    3,790
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Location:
    Parker County, Texas
    Here is something that I did last week, that may be of interest to anyone with a water well (or who's city water is very hard). I knew from having lived for a long time with a water well only four miles from here, that our water would be pretty hard. So I paid to have it thoroughly tested by a large commercial lab. In some ways, it was good news - very low iron content for example, and it's perfectly healthy water. But it is quite hard, at 376 mg/L (22 grains). We knew it was, from the film on dishes in the dishwasher and etc. We've been using and drinking it as is for the 11 months we've been living here and it doesn't particularly bother us, but it is hard on appliances, dishes, and clothes.

    We didn't want a conventional salt softener; I've lived with those before and didn't like them, so I did some research on other kinds of softeners and decided to try a chelating softener. These work by chemically binding the calcium and magnesium ions so that they can't precipitate out of the water as sulfates, bicarbonates, or chlorides and wreak havoc on your plumbing and appliances. Instead of having to back-flush and replace the salt as in a salt system, you just replace a large filter once every 6 months or so (the filter is good for 50,000 gallons). After reading a lot of reviews and recommendation, we decided to go with the Nuvo system. NuvoH2O Systems We bought the largest one they have, because our one water well and pressure tank will serve both the new house and the shop apartment we are living in now.

    Installation was pretty straightforward and I did it myself. All you have to do is identify which pipe comes into the pressure system from the well, and which goes out to the house(s). You install the filter in the "out" line of course. The water well driller ran 1" PEX line from the submersible pump in the well up to the pressure tank, and the plumber that plumbed the apartment used the same from the pressure tank to the apartment, so all I had to do was buy a couple of 10' lengths of 1" PEX from Lowes, some elbows and unions, and two 1" barbs with 1" NPT male threads to fit the filter housing.

    I have done all kinds of home plumbing before, including sweat-soldering copper pipe, but using PEX is a whole 'nother world of easy and quick. This was my first time to work with it, but it won't be the last. You can cut it straight with a cheap and quick razor-blade cutter made for PEX. Then you piece it together, using copper band rings at every connection. The copper bands are cheap compared to other clamps, $20 for a bag of 50. You do have to have a special calibrated clamper/crimper to squeeze the bands. The commercial plumbing supply house I bought the bands at had the tool for $200; Lowes had one for only $100. I bought the cheaper Lowes one and it works fine; if I was a plumber and was doing this every day, the more expensive one would probably be worth it. One squeeze with the tool is all you need to make a water-tight connection every time. So fast! The tool gives good tactile feedback; you know when the clamping is done, without guesswork. I spent way more time measuring and fussing over doing it right than it actually took to plumb the thing in.

    The filter housing itself needs to mounted sturdily to a wall, as it has to hold the weight of the filter full of water. I used a convenient metal brace/stud for the well house. A wall stud in a conventional house would also work.

    Here is the installed system. The 86-gallon pressure tank in the second photo gives you an idea of the size of the filter:



    We have only been using it for a few days, but we can already tell the difference in the dishes from the dishwasher. There might be a slight difference in taste, though I didn't mind the taste of the hard water so I might not be sensitive to it. I guess time will tell how well it really works, but we're happy for now.
     
  9. TLC Norway

    TLC Norway woodwelder SILVER Star

    Messages:
    2,243
    Media:
    33
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1,013
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Location:
    North of Norway
    wow, this is some house! Now, ive been building my share of concrete projects, huge barns with complex waste managing in the concrete, bridges for heavy equipment and so on. Looking at the rebar and concrete work for the domes is super cool, they have it figured. Hopefully that thing will be waterproof and you can move on.
    The shape and size of your shop is somewhat similar to the one i'm building here after fire took my previous one.
    i've quit concrete and housebuilding due to health and back issues, now only doing woodworking and logbuilding, taking up my passion.
    The cruisers will need their fair share of workspace and parking, (5 cruisers at the moment) but trying to plan an simple but optimal solution for woodworking and wrenching/welding in the same shop is a hazzle. i've just got my workshop somewhat raised and sheltered, gates and interior next.
    Do you have a planned layout for your shop? always interesting to see what experienced people do with their shop, layout and solutions for workbenches and storage. I've read your whole thread here, but what is your main trade? or will the shop be cruiser-land?

    good luck and cheers from Norway
    P
     
    1911 likes this.
  10. 1911

    1911 chupacabra

    Messages:
    4,991
    Media:
    187
    Albums:
    4
    Likes Received:
    3,790
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Location:
    Parker County, Texas
    Sorry to hear about your fire! Hope you didn't lose too much.


    I haven't got any firm plans yet. Currently, it is full of all our furniture and belongings from our last house, waiting to be moved into the big concrete house when it is finished. So frustrating, not to have any space to work on any vehicles.

    I did plan the new shop to the extent that I knew (from my last shop building) how much space I wanted, where the best location for the 2-post lift was, and where to put electrical outlets including 230 volts for a welder and etc.
    The workbenches and etc. will have to wait until the shop is empty again, after the house is completed.


    I'm in the oil business. My shop will be leased to one of my corporations, as my business requires 4WD trucks to get to out to the drilling rigs - so I need a place to be able to work on them and store tools and equipment. But the business is just me, so the shop space will be all mine.


    Thanks! My great-grandfather emigrated from Hjørring in Denmark. I need to get back there one of these days.
     
    waiting for time likes this.
  11. TLC Norway

    TLC Norway woodwelder SILVER Star

    Messages:
    2,243
    Media:
    33
    Albums:
    1
    Likes Received:
    1,013
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Location:
    North of Norway
    I did loose the shop after my grandfather, with a near rebuilt hj60 in it. It was heartbreaking, but got back on the horse again with a HJ61 soon after. so now its been 4 years of getting things back up and running after fixing the house.

    also thinking about doing a 2-post, still have not decided what will be the best placement for it, as it wont be used daily. maybe in a inner corner so the posts arent much in the way when im not using the lift.
    How do you plan to place yours?

    been cruising around Denmark a few times, and but i just drove trough Hjørring in a late night looking for a campsite near the beautiful beach. Took the hirtshals ferry back to norway the day after. Denmark is super easy to explore, fast roads take you anywhere in notime, and the winding country roads takes care of the scenic exploring. will definately go back a few times.
    There's a few pictures from that area in first page of my build thread: HJ61 Cruiser build
     
    1911 likes this.
  12. 1911

    1911 chupacabra

    Messages:
    4,991
    Media:
    187
    Albums:
    4
    Likes Received:
    3,790
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Location:
    Parker County, Texas
    Mine is already installed; photos of it in post #64 in this same thread: Building a new house and shop

    Mine is an assymetric lift, so it can go forward of center in the shop bay. I do plan to use mine a lot, so I have it centered laterally in one of the shop bays and overhead doors. It does not take up much floor space - even less if you disconnect the lift arms, and you can still park a truck in between the uprights when you are not using it.
     
    TLC Norway likes this.
  13. 1911

    1911 chupacabra

    Messages:
    4,991
    Media:
    187
    Albums:
    4
    Likes Received:
    3,790
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Location:
    Parker County, Texas
    Builders were back yesterday and today, and laid a whole 'nother coat of polymerized asphalt on the roof, and also patched a spot on the south retaining wall that was leaking because the dirt contractor had scraped it with a track steer. Good weather for it to cure this week, then we need another good rain to test it again. Would sure like to get on with back filling! Surely this time will do it (make it completely waterproof).
     
  14. PAToyota

    PAToyota Keystone Cruisers SILVER Star

    Messages:
    1,500
    Likes Received:
    416
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Location:
    South Central Pennsylvania
    Definitely worth it to take the time now to get it right. Being in the industry, everyone wants it to be like on TV - done in a week or even a weekend. I tell people a building has the potential to exist for hundreds of years. In the long run, a few extra weeks (or months) will be forgotten when you aren’t replacing things or fixing problems years from now.
     
    Rusty 72 and 1911 like this.
  15. 1911

    1911 chupacabra

    Messages:
    4,991
    Media:
    187
    Albums:
    4
    Likes Received:
    3,790
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Location:
    Parker County, Texas
    Great perspective, thanks!
     
    PAToyota likes this.
  16. PAToyota

    PAToyota Keystone Cruisers SILVER Star

    Messages:
    1,500
    Likes Received:
    416
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Location:
    South Central Pennsylvania
    I just cringe watching those shows…
    Hmmm…
    • No primer? Guess they’ll be repainting soon.
    • No flashing? Guess they’ll be replacing that when it all rots out.
    • Pouring concrete yesterday and enclosing it today? That’s going to cause mold.
    • Etc, etc, etc...
     
    thatcabledude likes this.
  17. 1911

    1911 chupacabra

    Messages:
    4,991
    Media:
    187
    Albums:
    4
    Likes Received:
    3,790
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Location:
    Parker County, Texas
    Mrs. 1911 watches all those Homo & Garden TV shows. It always cracks me up, when some poor sod buys an old house to fix up, and apparently does not spend one dime to address ancient plumbing, electrical, lack of insulation, no A/C in the south, and etc.

    We once a owned a solid house that was built in 1964, but we were plagued with cast-iron sewer pipes, haunted wiring (with few grounded outlets), old plumbing, etc. Can't imagine what some of those houses on tv way older than that would be like.
     
  18. PAToyota

    PAToyota Keystone Cruisers SILVER Star

    Messages:
    1,500
    Likes Received:
    416
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Location:
    South Central Pennsylvania
    My own house is a 1920’s Craftsman Bungalow. Yes, there are some issues - a few cracks in walls I have to patch every now and then, still some knob & tube still in service, and so forth. But then I see houses built within the past five years that are many, many times worse than anything I’ve ever dealt with here.

    The most common issues I see are lack of detailing (proper flashing being a major one) and cutting corners on things that really don’t add to construction cost - both more just that the contractors don’t want to be bothered.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2018
    1911 and thatcabledude like this.
  19. thatcabledude

    thatcabledude SILVER Star

    Messages:
    2,673
    Likes Received:
    7,635
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2011
    Location:
    Walton Co, FL
    You mean like installing vinyl siding on new construction with a hand stapler :lol:
     
    PAToyota likes this.
  20. PAToyota

    PAToyota Keystone Cruisers SILVER Star

    Messages:
    1,500
    Likes Received:
    416
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Location:
    South Central Pennsylvania
    The neighbor installed vinyl siding over his wood clapboards about the time I was stripping and painting my house. Since then, he’s replaced the faded vinyl and I’ve touched up the paint. ;)
     
    thatcabledude and CSteppe82 like this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.