Advice: How much should I pay for half of 2f engine rebuild process

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Oct 4, 2020
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161
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Idaho
Hi All,

I'm pulling the plug on a mechanic that's been taking far too long (like 4 months) to do an engine rebuild process for me on my 2f. He disassembled everything 5 months ago and the engines been sitting at a machine shop ever since. I want to move the process to Boulder CO with me and find someone else to help me with it, maybe even a mud member. curious what you all think is a fair price for me to pay for pulling of the engine on an 85 FJ60 and the typical ballpark labor hours and cost.

Also, since the machine shop hasn't done much to the engine I think I might pull it form there or just have them do the actual machining work and Ill do the reassembly myself. How much should just having them do the machine work cost ballpark?

Also if anyone can speak from experience, How s***ty is it going to be to ship the engine and truck with parts all over the place? Should I have them bolt the non rebuilt motor back in just for hauling it to CO?

Last question---- is it worth the effort to ship everything that way I can have the experience of doing it myself and getting it done sooner and not be disrespected with all the time its taking?

Beehanger
 

60Works

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Sorry for your difficulties. You're in a no win situation.

Here are a couple of quick observations:

Moving a project or retrieving parts from a belligerent vendor is going to be horribly frustrating and you will probably loose parts.

Your mechanic may be just as frustrated with the machinist as you are. He has no control over a sub contactor, only the influence of his business relationship. Changing mechanics may only make your situation worse.

Any machinist of any quality anywhere in the country is back logged months currently. Changing to a different machinist may just put you at the back of the line again.

Installing an engine, or assembling one, that you personally didn't remove is going to be very difficult (unless you have have done the same engine previously).

In general, I highly recommend doing the work yourself if you have some good mentors who you can ask questions and get some direct help. It is very satisfying and builds confidence. This probalby isn't one of those times. Sorry. We can heip you via this forum but there is no substitute for in person help.

As for price for work done by your mechanic, maybe 1/4 to 1/3 of the work is removal. It takes significantly longer to install that to remove.

For the machinist, it all depends on whether any work has been performed. If its all still on the shelf waiting, you could likely retrieve it without hassle. If work is in progress with valves removed and rods disassembled, you're best bet is to let them finish.


We feel your pain. Good luck.
 

CruiserTrash

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Denver
Hi All,

I'm pulling the plug on a mechanic that's been taking far too long (like 4 months) to do an engine rebuild process for me on my 2f. He disassembled everything 5 months ago and the engines been sitting at a machine shop ever since. I want to move the process to Boulder CO with me and find someone else to help me with it, maybe even a mud member. curious what you all think is a fair price for me to pay for pulling of the engine on an 85 FJ60 and the typical ballpark labor hours and cost.

Also, since the machine shop hasn't done much to the engine I think I might pull it form there or just have them do the actual machining work and Ill do the reassembly myself. How much should just having them do the machine work cost ballpark?

Also if anyone can speak from experience, How s***ty is it going to be to ship the engine and truck with parts all over the place? Should I have them bolt the non rebuilt motor back in just for hauling it to CO?

Last question---- is it worth the effort to ship everything that way I can have the experience of doing it myself and getting it done sooner and not be disrespected with all the time its taking?

Beehanger
Why Boulder, Colorado? Do you live there?

If you’re in the area I highly suggest Gunn Automotive Machine on Federal Blvd in Denver. I was recommended that place by a bunch of old cruiser heads in the area. When I arrived carrying my 2F head, Kenny the owner spotted it from about 30’ away and said “ah! 2F motor?” From what I gather he’s seen hundreds and hundreds of Fs and 2Fs and ver the past 3-4 decades.

Mine is not yet installed, but he did a great job walking me through all the work he did, using the finished head as shoe-and-tell.
 

g-man

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If he didn't finish the job why would you pay him anything? Assuming the mechanic sent the block and crank to the machine shop of his choosing and not your choosing then he should eat the cost. And that will make him think about choosing a more reputable machine shop in the future. Why in the world would you put it back together and mount it back in the vehicle? All the engine parts will fit in the back of the vehicle. Box and label everything. For example all the head bolts go in a ziploc bag labeled "head bolts". Then the bag goes in a box. Maybe with other bolts that are bagged and labeled.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Oct 4, 2020
Messages
161
Location
Idaho
Sorry for your difficulties. You're in a no win situation.

Here are a couple of quick observations:

Moving a project or retrieving parts from a belligerent vendor is going to be horribly frustrating and you will probably loose parts.

Your mechanic may be just as frustrated with the machinist as you are. He has no control over a sub contactor, only the influence of his business relationship. Changing mechanics may only make your situation worse.

Any machinist of any quality anywhere in the country is back logged months currently. Changing to a different machinist may just put you at the back of the line again.

Installing an engine, or assembling one, that you personally didn't remove is going to be very difficult (unless you have have done the same engine previously).

In general, I highly recommend doing the work yourself if you have some good mentors who you can ask questions and get some direct help. It is very satisfying and builds confidence. This probalby isn't one of those times. Sorry. We can heip you via this forum but there is no substitute for in person help.

As for price for work done by your mechanic, maybe 1/4 to 1/3 of the work is removal. It takes significantly longer to install that to remove.

For the machinist, it all depends on whether any work has been performed. If its all still on the shelf waiting, you could likely retrieve it without hassle. If work is in progress with valves removed and rods disassembled, you're best bet is to let them finish.


We feel your pain. Good luck.
Thanks for your response, I appreciate it. That’s what I needed to read. I’m leaning letting him finish the work and taking the hit financially. The biggest problem here is not having the financial means to carry such a big asset that is sucking money out, and that it happens to be my only car. I would love to think the land cruiser market will keep going up to counteract this because of high inflation, looming recession and GDP decline as physical assets/ vintage 4x4 toys are even more sought after, and that I can justify this whole process and driving it by that projection. Paid 15k for the rust free rig, could maybe sell for 25 with rebuilt engine+ a little love. Not sure all of your thoughts on that idea, threads that talk about this. I know some think we’re maxed out in terms of the market.
 
Joined
Oct 4, 2020
Messages
161
Location
Idaho
Sorry for your difficulties. You're in a no win situation.

Here are a couple of quick observations:

Moving a project or retrieving parts from a belligerent vendor is going to be horribly frustrating and you will probably loose parts.

Your mechanic may be just as frustrated with the machinist as you are. He has no control over a sub contactor, only the influence of his business relationship. Changing mechanics may only make your situation worse.

Any machinist of any quality anywhere in the country is back logged months currently. Changing to a different machinist may just put you at the back of the line again.

Installing an engine, or assembling one, that you personally didn't remove is going to be very difficult (unless you have have done the same engine previously).

In general, I highly recommend doing the work yourself if you have some good mentors who you can ask questions and get some direct help. It is very satisfying and builds confidence. This probalby isn't one of those times. Sorry. We can heip you via this forum but there is no substitute for in person help.

As for price for work done by your mechanic, maybe 1/4 to 1/3 of the work is removal. It takes significantly longer to install that to remove.

For the machinist, it all depends on whether any work has been performed. If its all still on the shelf waiting, you could likely retrieve it without hassle. If work is in progress with valves removed and rods disassembled, you're best bet is to let them finish.


We feel your pain. Good luck.
 
Joined
Jun 17, 2010
Messages
297
If the mechanic is good, I'd stay with him. It's the machinist fault. We are now living in a third world country. Things take forever, patience is required.

Just for reference, my brother bought a electric Porsche, it has been in the dealer shop since February. It's a $180,000 car and he is a lawyer. The dealer says they can't get parts.
 

2mbb

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Have you talked to the machinist? Do you know what the hold up is on his end?

This is really a question of cash flow and not investment. I think it is unlikely you will get all your investment back out so don’t count on that. Can you afford to have the job finished? Maybe this delay will actually help you because it may give you time to generate more income to pay for the work.

With the information provided I think the best solution is to finish the job. You will probably need to buy a daily driver so figure that into the equation. If you can’t finish then figure out how to sell and cut your losses.

This is just my opinion.
 
Joined
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Messages
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If the mechanic is good, I'd stay with him. It's the machinist fault. We are now living in a third world country. Things take forever, patience is required.

Just for reference, my brother bought a electric Porsche, it has been in the dealer shop since February. It's a $180,000 car and he is a lawyer. The dealer says they can't get parts.
Leaning this way. There's an 2f in orange a mudder is selling for $1800. Could swap that in with the current mechanic, have said mudder tune it, and save a few grand and time from what I've heard.

Also, legally speaking does anyone know how legally I can get out of having to pay the machinist per what @g-man said? I'll hopefully be able to sell the block and head to a shop like BTB or someone on here, but curious how it would work out legally with pulling the plug on the machinist.
Thanks for all your guys help- don't know how I could figure this out otherwise,
Dan
 

g-man

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Are you contractually obligated? Written agreement? If not, seems like then motor is your property and you should be able to recover it. And just for comparison, would you pay a landscaper if he only cut 1/2 your yard and left with no communication to come back? Would you pay a painter if he painted 1/2 your house and left with you not knowing if he was coming back? You get my point. The assumption is that you are paying for a complete job. Seems to me that the machinist should be more worried about legal action. Probably the best thing to do would be to contact him, preferably in person and find out as many specifics as to where he is in the process of his work on your motor/block/parts. What is the reason for the delay, when does he expect to finish...etc. Sometimes understanding another parties reasons or situation goes a long way in resolving conflict.
 
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Realized its going to be way too big of a s*** show to move the whole project to Boulder and not lose parts, don't have the financials to do so anyway. Spoke with the mechanic....Machine shop still has engine in the backlog. He has done the machining work but nothing else. Could be another 3 months. Absolute BS. So now I See 3 options to unf*** myself:
1. I Founda mudder on here willing to sell me and even install a used 2f for $1800 with 170k miles on it. It's a 30 minute drive from the project. I guess I could go this route and have the mechanic install it, or pick up all of the parts with said mudder and move the project to his place. I really have to be honest and say I am not fully confident in the mechanics abilities or timetable at this point, Nate sounds like he knows what he's doing.

2. Go and pick up the original machined engine from machine shop and complete the rebuild/pistons etc with someone who wants to help.

3.... the unthinkable.... Find someone to buy the truck and pick up the project and get some much needed cash, get another LC down the road. don't know how much of a loss I would take from doing this or how much I could get. I know I talked up keeping it but this is just becoming a massive thorn in my side, I wish it wasn't this way and can't believe it has gotten to this point.

Really wish I had more time money and knowledge but I simply do not have these things. If someone has knowledge on how unlikley option 3 is how much I could get let me know....
going to post a separate thread for that.

still slightly leaning option 1

God Bless
Daniel
 
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For reference I just paid a machine shop $600 for a head rebuild, valves not included.

Also... this shop told me up front if I wanted block work done, it would be 5 months before he could get to it. So the delay you reference, while frustrating, doesn't seem to be a one-off issue. I'm sure it would have been much better to know that up front though.

Best of luck.
 
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John McVicker

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If the machinists has completed all of the machine work & it only lacks assembly AND you have new pistons, rings, etc etc…I would suggest option 2…for sure.

Using the FSM it is not difficult to assemble an engine…even for a novice…follow the FSM AND then you are in charge of the outcome. It is not difficult to do a good job.
 

WarDamnEagle

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If he didn't finish the job why would you pay him anything? Assuming the mechanic sent the block and crank to the machine shop of his choosing and not your choosing then he should eat the cost. And that will make him think about choosing a more reputable machine shop in the future. Why in the world would you put it back together and mount it back in the vehicle? All the engine parts will fit in the back of the vehicle. Box and label everything. For example all the head bolts go in a ziploc bag labeled "head bolts". Then the bag goes in a box. Maybe with other bolts that are bagged and labeled.

Are you contractually obligated? Written agreement? If not, seems like then motor is your property and you should be able to recover it. And just for comparison, would you pay a landscaper if he only cut 1/2 your yard and left with no communication to come back? Would you pay a painter if he painted 1/2 your house and left with you not knowing if he was coming back? You get my point. The assumption is that you are paying for a complete job. Seems to me that the machinist should be more worried about legal action. Probably the best thing to do would be to contact him, preferably in person and find out as many specifics as to where he is in the process of his work on your motor/block/parts. What is the reason for the delay, when does he expect to finish...etc. Sometimes understanding another parties reasons or situation goes a long way in resolving conflict.

As much as I appreciate your sentiments, there are so many things that can go wrong with this course of action (at least until you get to the highlighted section). They have the man's property and don't have to volunteer it up without payment, unless there was a written contract with stipulated time frames, and, and, and. And even then you might have to take them to court to get your property back. The yard man, on the other hand, can't exactly remove your yard, at least not pragmatically, and hold it ransom at his house until he receives payment for half the yard. The last thing you want to do is to piss them off so that they "lose" your parts.

Now the highlighted section of your post, on the other hand, is a much better course of action.
 

g-man

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As much as I appreciate your sentiments, there are so many things that can go wrong with this course of action (at least until you get to the highlighted section). They have the man's property and don't have to volunteer it up without payment, unless there was a written contract with stipulated time frames, and, and, and. And even then you might have to take them to court to get your property back. The yard man, on the other hand, can't exactly remove your yard, at least not pragmatically, and hold it ransom at his house until he receives payment for half the yard. The last thing you want to do is to piss them off so that they "lose" your parts.

Now the highlighted section of your post, on the other hand, is a much better course of action.
I didn't mean the OP should just show up and get is stuff. Certainly not without permission. Without a legal contract and without knowing the details of the work that had been done and what particulars have been promised, it's hard to say who had a legal standing. I just disagreed with the OP's assersion in the posts title that starts off with... "how much should I pay?...". I'm just not certain that that is the right frame of mind. But we have too little details. The devil is in the details.
 

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