Tire size vs Tire weight (37s vs 40s) 80 series (1 Viewer)

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So I thought it would be fun to see the opinions on this. Gladiator just released a 40x13.5r17 all terrain tire weighing in around 80lbs from my tiny bit of research. Now when compared to a 37x13.5r17 toyo mt that weights ~90lbs which one actually has more wear on the trucks? Still more likely to break stuff with the 40s even weighting 10lbs less? Let’s face it 37s are becoming standard running gear now
Gladiator Tires - https://gladiatortires.com/tires/x-comp-at
 
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One is a rolling mass issue, the other is a torque issue.

Two different scenarios, regardless.of weight.

Taller tires create more torque resistance when climbing and in slow maneuvers and tire weight has little effect on this.

Heavier tires are resistant to rolling mass and are harder to bring up to speed so available torque and gas mileage suffer.

Braking is affected by both, as mass and torque both come into effect in a panic brake situation. The smaller tire would win here from a brake fatigue or overheat situation.
 
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One is a rolling mass issue, the other is a torque issue.

Two different scenarios, regardless.of weight.

Taller tires create more torque resistance when climbing and in slow maneuvers and tire weight has little effect on this.

Heavier tires are resistant to rolling mass and are harder to bring up to speed so available torque and gas mileage suffer.

Braking is affected by both, as mass and torque both come into effect in a panic brake situation. The smaller tire would win here from a brake fatigue or overheat situation.
That’s makes a ton of sense, very well said. So basically more likely to break if your wheeling, but hwy driving may actually be better with the lighter/bigger tire
 
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37’s are as big as you can get away with before massaging or removing sheet metal.

I bolted on my 39.5” iroks on the 80 for fun the other year. Had the bags aired all the way up but couldn’t turn hardly at all without rubbing. But basically they were a no go with sheet metal and fenders in place even with a lot of lift.
And now I’m working slowly on getting one ton axles and cutting sheet metal to fit over 40 inches of tires. It just gets expensive after 37’s.
 
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Echoing @BILT4ME sentiment. I personally think 33's with 305x70's are plenty enough to do what these Cruisers were meant to do... Anything after THAT, get's expensive.
 

Broski

I love Wheelin my 80
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37’s are as big as you can get away with before massaging or removing sheet metal.

I bolted on my 39.5” iroks on the 80 for fun the other year. Had the bags aired all the way up but couldn’t turn hardly at all without rubbing. But basically they were a no go with sheet metal and fenders in place even with a lot of lift.
And now I’m working slowly on getting one ton axles and cutting sheet metal to fit over 40 inches of tires. It just gets expensive after 37’s.
Running 39s on a 3" lift, Your not kidding it's a lot of work & $ to do it right
 

Broski

I love Wheelin my 80
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Echoing @BILT4ME sentiment. I personally think 33's with 305x70's are plenty enough to do what these Cruisers were meant to do... Anything after THAT, get's expensive.
I most have missed it in my manual what these Reg were meant to do. :rofl:
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ppc

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I am pretty sure centrifugal force is also at play with a spinning tire.

No, centrifugal force does not come into play in regards to the OP's question related to impact of weight and diameter on component wear. An example of centrifugal force is when a washing machine spin cycle forces the water out of the clothes or what causes an out of balance tire to vibrate. Another good example is in a dragster, centrifugal force (rotation) causes the diameter of the rotating tire to dramatically increase in size as the speed of rotation increases because the force is greater than the static elasticity of the tire. The force extends equally around the circumference at the same time yielding no net movement forward.
 
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No, centrifugal force does not come into play in regards to the OP's question related to impact of weight and diameter on component wear. An example of centrifugal force is when a washing machine spin cycle forces the water out of the clothes or what causes an out of balance tire to vibrate. Another good example is in a dragster, centrifugal force (rotation) causes the diameter of the rotating tire to dramatically increase in size as the speed of rotation increases because the force is greater than the static elasticity of the tire. The force extends equally around the circumference at the same time yielding no net movement forward.
I'm pretty sure that a bi-directional, cross-splined, oscillating tripacitor will solve this problem. They are breathtakingly expensive, but if you can find one, you'll be golden to run up to 42s on stock axles.
 

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