Projecting, tinkering, fiddle-farting around: whatcha building?

YMT

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
295
Location
El Portal, CA
I have some stock 80 coils that I want to use for a project. You guys have any ideas of what to make or how to use (other than for suspension)?

I've thought out using some pine slabs I have and making an outdoor bench or something, and using the coils for legs, but I think it would be too shaky.
 

KLF

Frame waxer
SILVER Star
Joined
Apr 5, 2003
Messages
8,558
Location
Southern NH
 
 
 
I have some stock 80 coils that I want to use for a project. You guys have any ideas of what to make or how to use (other than for suspension)?

I've thought out using some pine slabs I have and making an outdoor bench or something, and using the coils for legs, but I think it would be too shaky.
I've always wanted to get an old spring like that to make a new post for my mailbox. That way when the damned snow plow hits it, it will just bounce out of the way, then bounce back.
 

The Jade Bean

Hobby coffee roaster and Toyota junkie.
Supporting Vendor
Joined
Aug 22, 2011
Messages
4,755
Location
Keller, Texas
 
I have some stock 80 coils that I want to use for a project. You guys have any ideas of what to make or how to use (other than for suspension)?

I've thought out using some pine slabs I have and making an outdoor bench or something, and using the coils for legs, but I think it would be too shaky.
Legs for metal yard animal, yard toy/ride for kiddos, spring shoes to bounce around??
 
Joined
Jul 18, 2015
Messages
450
Location
Canton, Michigan
New project: Refurbishment of my wife's dad's old Craftsman 10" Radial Arm Saw. He passed away probably 50 years ago, and I 'inherited' this a good 30 years or so back. I used it for a few things, but since I have a table saw, it didn't see much work. And when I got a power miter saw, It saw no work. I debated whether to part it out and get $100 from Emerson (part of the recall), but decided since it has some 'history' to keep it. And I hate parting with tools...

I decided against a full resto, as I wanted to keep it 'as is'. Old tools need some patina.

First a good cleaning and base refurb: I added a top (trimmed in red oad) and a re-enforced bottom shelf (the original was just open). Lubed up the casters, etc. Then I rewired with 14ga heavy duty cord (original was 16ga), plus a new (better and safer) switch. I can bump the saw off using my knee:

20200515_205154.jpg


Next on to constructing a new table. I'm making the table slightly wider and longer than the original Sears table:

20200517_194239.jpg


I'm building the table based on the Mr. Sawdust design with steel internal reinforcement (note the groves for the 1/4x3/4 steel bar stock):

20200520_094557.jpg


Gluing it up (found a use for my lead shot filled bags):

20200519_122215.jpg


Trimmed out in red oak (the top weighs 57 pounds!), and now deciding how to cut it for the fence:

20200520_181214.jpg


There is a piece of 1/4' MDF inserted into the top. This is replaceable as it will get cut up with use.

Once I get the mounting figured out, I'll tackle the dust collection issue. A radial arm saw is a major distributor of sawdust. Got to tame this beast.
 
Last edited:

1911

chupacabra
Joined
Aug 11, 2006
Messages
6,025
Location
Parker County, Texas
 
 
New project: Refurbishment of my wife's dad's old Craftsman 10" Radial Arm Saw. He passed away probably 50 years ago, and I 'inherited' this a good 30 years or so back. I used it for a few things, but since I have a table saw, it didn't see much work. And when I got a power miter saw, It saw no work. I debated whether to part it out and get $100 from Emerson (part of the recall), but decided since it has some 'history' to keep it. And I hate parting with tools...

I decided against a full resto, as I wanted to keep it 'as is'. Old tools need some patina.

First a good cleaning and base refurb: I added a top (trimmed in red oad) and a re-enforced bottom shelf (the original was just open). Lubed up the casters, etc. Then I rewired with 14ga heavy duty cord (original was 16ga), plus a new (better and safer) switch. I can bump the saw off using my knee:

View attachment 2313648

Next on to constructing a new table. I'm making the table slightly wider and longer than the original Sears table:

View attachment 2313650

I'm building the table based on the Mr. Sawdust design with steel internal reinforcement (note the groves for the 1/4x3/4 steel bar stock):

View attachment 2313651

Gluing it up (found a use for my lead shot filled bags):

View attachment 2313652

Trimmed out in red oak (the top weighs 57 pounds!), and now deciding how to cut it for the fence:

View attachment 2313654

There is a piece of 1/4' MDF inserted into the top. This is replaceable as it will get cut up with use.

Once I get the mounting figured out, I'll tackle the dust collection issue. A radial arm saw is a major distributor of sawdust. Got to tame this beast.
My dad had one pretty near exactly like that one. He built a ton of nice furniture and other stuff with it. I didn't keep it after he died five years ago; maybe I should have.
 

Mauser

Supporting Vendor
Joined
Jun 20, 2018
Messages
1,045
Location
Central New Mexico
I have some stock 80 coils that I want to use for a project. You guys have any ideas of what to make or how to use (other than for suspension)?

I've thought out using some pine slabs I have and making an outdoor bench or something, and using the coils for legs, but I think it would be too shaky.
Japanese spring steel is some of the best stock for making chisels and punches.
 

The Jade Bean

Hobby coffee roaster and Toyota junkie.
Supporting Vendor
Joined
Aug 22, 2011
Messages
4,755
Location
Keller, Texas
 
Looking for advice. I saw this and loved it. My brides b-day is coming up and I’d like to make this as yard art for her. How do you think I could about creating these curves? My thought was tack welding to a 3”+ piece of round tube, use a torch to heat and roll until you get the desired look. Any other ideas? TIA!
6C95FDFB-7EB6-411B-A261-82BA5701362E.jpeg
 

YMT

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
295
Location
El Portal, CA
Looking for advice. I saw this and loved it. My brides b-day is coming up and I’d like to make this as yard art for her. How do you think I could about creating these curves? My thought was tack welding to a 3”+ piece of round tube, use a torch to heat and roll until you get the desired look. Any other ideas? TIA! View attachment 2314476
Use some large diameter PVC? Are you wanting the same size, or a smaller scaled version? PVC could work well for smaller scale.

Clamp and roll could work too for sheet metal, but I think you'd want a larger diameter pipe to use for the curve.
 

The Jade Bean

Hobby coffee roaster and Toyota junkie.
Supporting Vendor
Joined
Aug 22, 2011
Messages
4,755
Location
Keller, Texas
 
Use some large diameter PVC? Are you wanting the same size, or a smaller scaled version? PVC could work well for smaller scale.

Clamp and roll could work too for sheet metal, but I think you'd want a larger diameter pipe to use for the curve.
PVC won’t work for the thickness steel I’d like to use or I don’t think it would. I can’t imagine the steel would curve easily. I’m not planning to use sheet metal. I’d like to make it pretty close to that size.
 
Joined
Jul 18, 2015
Messages
450
Location
Canton, Michigan
After a couple days of measuring, figurin', re-measuring, re-figurin': I bit the bullet and cut the top. Got it drilled, and bolted down. Cut the replaceable insert and dropped it in:

20200522_151430.jpg


20200522_155110.jpg


Will probably be next week before I can put a couple of coats of polyurethane on it. Then go through the procedure of aligning everything. Following that, I'll tackle the dust collection part of the project.
 
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