Front Main Seal While-I'm-In-There REVISED with P/Ns... (1 Viewer)

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My cruiser appears to have caught the crank seal oil leak bug and I am tossing between a self repair and a shop repair. I have replaced a crank seal in the past on the chevy 350 that I built for my other truck and have lots of mechanical skills. I would change oil pump seal at the same time as that only makes sense. I questions the risk of snapping screws on the oil pump and then having to extract. Would also need to purchase 3/4" breaker, torque wrench, and socket to complete the job. My main issue is time to complete the repair vs. the cost of paying someone to do it for me. Are the oil cover screws really that big of a pain and do they commonly snap off? Any advice or thoughts? Anyone paid to have the repair done? What should it cost - ballpark figure? I have one quote from an independent toyo mechanic for around $800.
 

jaymar

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My cruiser appears to have caught the crank seal oil leak bug and I am tossing between a self repair and a shop repair. I have replaced a crank seal in the past on the chevy 350 that I built for my other truck and have lots of mechanical skills. I would change oil pump seal at the same time as that only makes sense. I questions the risk of snapping screws on the oil pump and then having to extract. Would also need to purchase 3/4" breaker, torque wrench, and socket to complete the job. My main issue is time to complete the repair vs. the cost of paying someone to do it for me. Are the oil cover screws really that big of a pain and do they commonly snap off? Any advice or thoughts? Anyone paid to have the repair done? What should it cost - ballpark figure? I have one quote from an independent toyo mechanic for around $800.
Someone told me reluctant screws may be persuaded with a little heating, as they're apparently in with some loctite-like material...
 
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In my experience, the don't snap off, but they can strip out. If you follow all of the prep, your chances of that are lessened.

I was hesitant before I tackled this job, but it's really not that bad.
 
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Good to hear that, thanks for the info. The job looks fairly easy compared to the pressed fit blanacer/pulley on my chevy motor. Time will be a big factor. How important are the last 5 ft-lbs of torque on the crank bolt? If HF torque wrench has a max of 300 ft-lbs is that good enough?
 
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Bambusiero

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I only have the one time - everything went well, no difficulties.
Payed close attention to the lessons of those who went before, followed all best practice procedures.

Main thing is the Phillips bit. Set yourself up for 1st time success.
- Clean out the screw slots - spotless.
- Quality bit from a reputable manufacturer, new unused. 2 or 3 on hand?
- Must fit snug & tight, NO WIGGLE ALLOWED. #2 if I recall?
If there is any play at all - DO NOT PROCEED, something is wrong.
- Final set of the bit into the screw by tapping straight in with hammer. tap tap tap.
- Then you hit it with the impact.

Very unlikely to cam out or strip if you got all that right to begin with.
 
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I believe it's #3 for the screws?

I will be tackling this job in the next few weeks with radiator replacement. The 305 lb torque wrench was my only concern, unfortunately I forgot all about the torque formulas so I am glad someone brought it up. It is going to save me from a limited use tool purchase!
 
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Quite a solution there! I'd be afraid of throwing the torque wrench calibration out of whack. Q: Am I REALLY going to need an impact wrench for the oil pump cover screws, even when I have a straight shot at them with the radiator out? Daily driver, so I want no surprises along the way...

Small impact driver makes quick work of these. Clean the screw heads with brake cleaner so they are dry first, then tap the bit into place with a hammer. I did something like 30 small taps to really drive it in there, and zipped it loose with an impact.
 

clx16

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I had one of the screws fly apart upon removal. I used hex screws to be nice to myself next time.

Mr t did a lot right but i don't think JIS or Philips screw heads was the best choice here.

I second everyone who recommends the little impact drivers...they are great in general and will make you wonder how the world turned before their existence.
 
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This has probably been said already, but be sure to use JIS drivers. A regular phillips will just cam out. I had my radiator out at the time and used a hand impact driver with a hammer and didn't have any drama. I went slow and steady.
 
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As much as I like to fault the use of JIS/phillip head screws for this application I do have to give credit - one seal replacement in 25 years/300k is pretty impressive. I had thoughts of using something other than OEM such as a hex head but decided just to go with the OEM screws out of laziness and the fact that it worked before.

As for the JIS bit I'm sure they are slightly better but I was able to achieve very positive contact with a brand new #3 phillips bit tapped into place with a hammer. The key thing is to thoroughly clean out the screw heads and tap the bit into place before even trying to turn it to preserve the surface.
 

jaymar

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Small impact driver makes quick work of these. Clean the screw heads with brake cleaner so they are dry first, then tap the bit into place with a hammer. I did something like 30 small taps to really drive it in there, and zipped it loose with an impact.
Glad it went well. I've also come across folks who've stripped or broken the screws doing it this way and have sworn off impacts for this job...
 
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Another question/thought, is it best to replace the seal on the timing chain cover at the same time. I am wondering if oil could also be leaking from that seal at the bottom front of engine. behind the crank pulley.
 

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