FIRST POST: PLEASE CHECK MY WORK (1 Viewer)

Joined
Oct 30, 2014
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Austin, TX
Hey guys,

So I’m the new owner of a 1996 FZJ80. I don’t have a whole lot of experience working on cars, but she is my baby and I wanna treat her right, so I’m trying to learn. I figure I’m as smart as the average bear so with a lot of research I can figure it out. This weekend I want to start small by replacing the front brake pads.

I figured I’d list the steps I’m gonna take and if you guys want to chime in with any tips, experiences or warnings it would be greatly appreciated.

1. Jack up the rig and remove wheels.

a. From what I’ve seen on here it seems that using jack stands is the way to go. Im gonna pop them under the axle close to the wheel on each side.

2. Remove brake caliper with 10mm socket.

3. Remove worn pads.

4. Push pistons back in.

a. I plan on using a C clamp and the old pads to do this. From what ive read the easiest way to do this would be to take the cap off the master cylinder. I also saw a video where a guy put a vise grip on the brake line before removing the caliper. Any feedback here would be appreciated.

5. Install new pads.

6. Reassemble caliper to wheel

7. Put wheel back on and lower

8. Pump the brakes a good number of times while chugging a lone star.

So like I said, I’m a beginner. If i've missed something or am doing something boneheaded feel free to explain anything to me like a five year old. Your expertise is greatly appreciated. CHEERS!!!!
 

SmokingRocks

I bought a Cruiser to keep miles off my Cruiser
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Welcome to Ih8mud! Great source of information here!

I don't think you need to remove the calipers. If I remember correctly the pads are serviceable with the caliper attached. Take a look at this video, around the 7+ min mark he explains how to remove the pads. Once out you can compress the pistons, put new pads in then reset the pins.

 
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fj80pb

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Welcome to the forum indeed.
By all means you should always use jack stands while working on your rig. Also, make you self a favor and get a FSM...ASAP. While you'll get plenty of good advice here, the FSM is the most invaluable source of knowledge.
BTW, couple of weeks ago, I just did the same job in both our 120 & 80 series. Although there's no need to take the caliper apart to replace the pads, I seldom do it in order to inspect & clean them up-but that's me. You'll be fine if you decide not to remove them.

Cheers
 
Joined
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Wow! Only been on here an hour and you guys have already saved me some time and an avoidable pain in the ass.

As far as pushing the pistons back in, do y'all think taking the cap of the master cylinder will work alright?

Thanks again guys!
 
Joined
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Simpsonville, SC
The point of taking the reservoir off is to relieve the pressure of fluid flowing back into it from compressing the pistons. Often times the brake fluid is topped off as fluid level drops as pads wear. Replace pads and suddenly you have fluid running over the top of the reservoir. Removing the cap prevents damaging the cap/reservoir
 

Hornd

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If the level of brake fluid reaches the top of the Master Cylinder when pushing the calipers back use a turkey baster to remove some.
Wash off brake fluid with water. It eats paint, but is water soluble.
Doing your brakes is a good first step, and will save a ton of money over the years.
 

Crusha

Self-censoring my mud posts...
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Ignore the video you saw where the guy clamps his brake line with Vise-Grips...:eek:
 
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Castaic, Los Angeles
They are top loading calipers, there is no need to remove them. The calipers need to be torqued on at 90ftlbs, then re-torqued after a few drive cycles, if they aren't you run the risk of the bolts backing out and having the caliper lock up the wheel (probably a long shot, but why risk it. Someone on the forum has had it happen).

Pull the spring out of the the ends of the guide pins then rotate it out of the caliper.
Pull the guide pins out.
Leave both pads in the caliper, use a crescent wrench on the ear of on of the pads (where the guide pin slides through) and the body of the caliper to compress the piston.
Replace that worn pad with a new one, then compress the other worn pad the same way and replace with the other new pad.
Re-install the guide pins and retaining spring.

I usually put a thin coat of grease on the guide pins and a very thin layer of rtv on the back of the brake pads. When the rtv on the back of the pads set up it helps to keep the brakes from squeeling.

It takes longer to remove the wheels and put the truck on stands than it does to change the pads.

DO NOT vice grip the lines. There is no need and it will damage them.
 
Joined
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It's simple, my procedure:

Jack up the front, place on stands, shake the rig to be sure it's solid, then remove the wheels.

Using a cup and turkey baster remove as much fluid as possible from the reservoir.

Remove the wire clips, pins and anti rattle springs from the calipers. Use a pry bar against the old pads to fully compress the pistons, then remove the pads.

Note where the edges of the metal backing of old pads contacted the calipers, apply a light skin of brake grease to the same places on the new pads. Only on the metal, don't get it any where else. Reinstall all of the parts, I also put a light skin (just enough to make it shinny) on the pins. Clean any grease, finger prints, etc off of the rotors with brake cleaner.

Back to the reservoir, suck as much fluid out as possible, then refill with fresh fluid. Pump the pedal to return the pistons to position, then recheck/fill the fluid level.

Inspect everything, torque the wheels on and drive. I always bed the new brakes as soon as possible.

Takes longer to type than to do!:hillbilly:
 
Joined
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Thanks again to everyone who has posted. I'm feeling pretty confident about the project now. Im hoping my next thread isnt "I screwed up" haha. You guys have a good weekend!

Ed
 

fj80pb

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One thing I forgot mentioning is a PM practice that was posted in the forum quite some years ago and that has served me well.

At every fluid and/or brake maintenance, I also replace the brake fluid at the reservoir (I empty the reservoir with a manual pump worth less than ten bucks), inspect and clean the reservoir filter. Fill up to max and done. Needless to say, I started the practice with a first thorough flushing of the entire system to assure a clean starting base-but everybody would agree this ain't any fun.
Good quality brake fluid isn't expensive. By frequently replacing almost half of the total system capacity the resulting dilution maintains a reliable and clean system and widens the frequency of flushing.
I drive quite a lot through mountain roads. This is a heavy rig, therefore the brakes are set for a work-out quite often. After doing this frequent PM I have never experienced fading-which I did before.
I understand for some this could be an overkill. But isn't complicated. And cheap.
Hope this helps

Cheers
 
Joined
Oct 30, 2014
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Austin, TX
UPDATE: MISSION COMPLETE

After receiving all this good advice the job just took a little over an hour or so. There were no hiccups other than my nosy neighbor asking if I had read the bylaws of our HOA. Appararently "auto repair" is frowned upon. Pretty much told her to piss off in nicer terms of course.

Thanks again yall
 
Joined
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San Diego, Discovered by The Germans in 1904
Good deal. Did the pads need replacing or were just up for doing something? Did you use 100 series pads? What about the rear pads? Any plans to do those soon? If so, the calipers DO need to come off to replace them. Might as well bleed the brakes after you do the rears.

Check out the FAQ and start working your way through the recommended baseline stuff. As you can tell, the folks here are very helpful so don't be afraid to ask questions (after you use the search of course). Welcome to the addiction.
 
Joined
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Austin, TX
@flyingmonkey Yeah they definately needed replacing. I heard a rubbing noise a few days ago so I popped the wheel off and saw they were in bad shape. As far as I know I didnt use 100 series pads. Can I? Should I? I just went to Autozone and bought some mid-range (duralast gold) for a 96. Im gonna take a look at the back pads today, and if needed change those out next payday.

Addiction is right, I cant stop thinking about what to do next. Probably get some slotted rotors and performance pads sooner or later. Ive been watching a bunch of overland videos on youtube and think its badass how some guys can repair their rig out in the middle of nowhere. I figured before I start thinking about mods, Ill learn all the basic maintenace stuff so Im not SOL in the city, much less the dessert.
 
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Sarasota, FL
One of the best things I've done with my brakes is installing speed bleeders during the last pad change, makes flushing the lines so simple. I had used a vacuum bleeder in the past with good success but after installing some speed bleeders it made the job so much easier.

For about under $20 bucks using a 10 off 25 online at AA it was one of the cheaper mods too.
 

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