Wheel Bearings Service w/Pics (3 Viewers)

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Awesome write up and pictures.
"Snap ring size C 2.6mm; Adjusting nut @ 65ft/lbs + locking nut @ 47 ft/lbs = 13lb breakaway"
I think FSM instruction say to tighten to 6.5 N m *

Almost posted this...
Realized the units posted were different from what I used (N m) when done recently. :doh:
Pay attention to the units for torque specs

It seems like the breakaway is more indicative of the actual preload, the torque is just supposed to get you in the ballpark? In my case, it took much more torque than the manual to get the right preload.
 
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Baton Rouge, LA
It’s important to displace all the grease and get as tight a fit as possible for the snap rings. Any longitudinal play at all between the shaft splines and the flange can be too much. Once the sawing action begins it will wear splines and then wear the ring groove bigger. It’s a big cause of mystery clunks. Also, forces splines to wear prematurely, and axles are expensive.

Yeah that does make sense, intuitively it just seems odd that the service manual doesn't mention needing this to be as tight of a fit as we seem to be trying to achieve if it's so critical to axle/spline health. I'm not willing to find out by not making it a tight fit though.
 
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Yeah that does make sense, intuitively it just seems odd that the service manual doesn't mention needing this to be as tight of a fit as we seem to be trying to achieve if it's so critical to axle/spline health. I'm not willing to find out by not making it a tight fit though.

Two different but important steps in the reassembly process. I thought you were referring to the tight pulling in of the driveshafts (axles) tight to the flange to fit the fattest c-clip possible. My post above refers to that. There are different methods but many people create a puller and that is maybe the best way to do it. I’ve used the height adjustment of my AHC to “squash” the shafts in tight, seemed to work well. I’ll likely use a puller next time.

The preload on the tightening nut is a totally different step that comes before. It’s also been discussed here especially in the “Bearing Repack Gurus” thread. Yes, it seems to take a lot of torque to produce the required preload and the FSM is a little vague. Read that thread and you’ll find some good methods and approaches to get where you need to be. I’ve read many reports of damage due to insufficient preload. Seems to be a common issue and that’s why there’s so much attention given to making sure it’s done properly. I’ve read one notable report within the past year (can’t remember who posted) of one being done much too tight, probably just run on with an air gun by a shade-tree mechanic. The thought was, as long as it’s not too loose.... Looked like the whole hub got fried.
 
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colorado
FSM says tighten adjusting nut until 42-67 Nm (or 9-15 lbf) breakaway is achieved. Not sure where you're getting 6.5 Nm.
I used this FSM off of the main page link. Step d in part 2 states retighten adjusting nut to 4.3-6.5 Nm. That probably gives the rough preload of 42-67 Nm. I assume torque may be different to achieve the right breakaway anyway, maybe over specified spec too?
1598340234039.jpeg
 
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It seems like the breakaway is more indicative of the actual preload, the torque is just supposed to get you in the ballpark? In my case, it took much more torque than the manual to get the right preload.
Can higher torque indicate bearing “health”? New bearings or serviced?
 

gregnash

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Can higher torque indicate bearing “health”? New bearings or serviced?
I don't believe that higher torque will indicate anything other than possibly premature wheel bearing wear and failure, check out @ClassyJalopy build thread where he had a mobile mechanic install and just torque the bearing down without proper preload and process.

But it really comes down to "how much" higher torque you are talking about. A bit (say final preload being closer to like 17-20ftlbs instead of the 9.5-15 like the FSM calls for you are getting into the real of things being too tight and your wheel bearings wearing excessively.
 
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Austin, TX
Help needed....I am trying to re-install the rotor, but the rear bearing wont slide all the way on. I thought maybe the wrong part was in the box so I tried to slide on the old bearing and it won't slide on either. What am I doing wrong? Drivers side slid right on. I have attached picture showing the I cannot even slide on the old bearing.
bearing.jpg
 

TheForger

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Help needed....I am trying to re-install the rotor, but the rear bearing wont slide all the way on. I thought maybe the wrong part was in the box so I tried to slide on the old bearing and it won't slide on either. What am I doing wrong? Drivers side slid right on. I have attached picture showing the I cannot even slide on the old bearing. View attachment 2433445
Did you just do it that way to show it won’t slide on? That large rear bearing needs to be inside the back of the hub assembly and then the oil seal placed on top of it. I remember when I had everything put back together and tried sliding the rotor & hub back on it required me to lift it up slightly to slide it the last 10%.
 

OwnerCS

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It would be really nice if we had a club member that was selling the flat bar tool for us machine shop challenged folks.
 

TheForger

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It would be really nice if we had a club member that was selling the flat bar tool for us machine shop challenged folks.
I would be willing to duplicate my little puller tool using the square tubing and include all necessary hardware. It wouldn’t have threaded holes like the bar stock but it would still work great. I would obviously not make it 3’ but more like 6” for shipping purposes (able to fit in a small priority mail or even first class envelope).
 

kruisinkid

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worked pretty good for me. you could attach a ratchet strap to a tree or something for some extra oomph
 

TheForger

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worked pretty good for me. you could attach a ratchet strap to a tree or something for some extra oomph
Not a bad option!

Keep in mind if you also grease the needle bearings, after you pull the axle out you really need to let it sit for just a couple minutes to make sure the grease squeezes in all the crevasses and then give it another good pull to make sure that didn’t create more room for movement. Then it needs to stay pulled completely out while you fit a new c-clip on.
 

OwnerCS

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I would be willing to duplicate my little puller tool using the square tubing and include all necessary hardware. It wouldn’t have threaded holes like the bar stock but it would still work great. I would obviously not make it 3’ but more like 6” for shipping purposes (able to fit in a small priority mail or even first class envelope).

That would be good.. Hey neighbor, you wouldn't even need to ship mine. :)
 

kruisinkid

topless dorkel
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when i greased the spindle with the slee tool, it pushed the CV almost an inch into the diff which was a little terrifying so i stopped. have a needle tip so i squirted the bushing with grease and smeared some around back there and then slid the CV back toward the hub. pulled it with my finger and then took a pry bar through the eye and pulled. put on a new D snap ring with no gap and buttoned her up. just when out to check if it had loosened up and it had not so it seems my method checks out. after about 20 miles anyway. all the parts to put in new bearings came in so that is on the docket for next week
 
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I did this job a few years ago and now I’m due to revisit it. I’ve read the discussions about best way to grease the spindle bearing. I have the Slee tool, but I’m not sure why. I didn’t need it last time. Don’t I have to pull the hub all apart to grease the wheel bearings anyway? Is there an occasion where I’d need to grease the spindle and not the hub? Maybe I’m remembering wrong.
 

OwnerCS

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when i greased the spindle with the slee tool, it pushed the CV almost an inch into the diff which was a little terrifying so i stopped. have a needle tip so i squirted the bushing with grease and smeared some around back there and then slid the CV back toward the hub. pulled it with my finger and then took a pry bar through the eye and pulled. put on a new D snap ring with no gap and buttoned her up. just when out to check if it had loosened up and it had not so it seems my method checks out. after about 20 miles anyway. all the parts to put in new bearings came in so that is on the docket for next week

I'm running D-size rings on my new OEM CV axles. That size filled up the groove on the new axle. Though having a tool would be much better than the method I used to pull the shaft through the hub flange..
 

TheForger

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Put together an axle puller tool. I think I finally got all the measurements down and hardware picked out. Having access to a manual mill also makes things much easier. This one is spoken for but if anyone would like another just let me know and I can get a price down and put a couple together.

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It can be supported from the hub flange studs...

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...or the alignment dimples

8414400D-7962-4B8C-85E1-DA998FEBC192.jpeg
 

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