Builds Rediscovering an '87 FJ60

HemiAlex

Long live the 2F
Supporting Vendor
GOLD Star
Joined
Sep 28, 2015
Messages
3,447
Location
Houston
Website
yotaoilfilters.com
They're torqued to 90 ft/lbs... They definitely squish out a ton, but they did get to the proper torque.

View attachment 2985584


I totally forgot to add those part numbers.. An honestly, no idea what valving they are, I just went with what @HemiAlex recommended in a thread somewhere..

PartNumberQuantityNote
Front shocks33-2303682Bilstein
Rear shocks33-1856062Bilstein


If I had my truck put together when I ordered these and could measure full droop and compression, I'd have preferred to order FOX 2.0s. I've got them on another vehicle and they are my favorite of the "mid tier" shocks that don't get into the adjustable on the trail, remote reservoir price range.

I’ve put 60,000 miles on my bilsteins listed above.

Zero issues. They’re still great.

My OME 005 heavy springs are sagging. Not happy with that.
 

CruiserTrash

SILVER Star
Joined
Jul 15, 2020
Messages
634
Location
Denver
I’ve put 60,000 miles on my bilsteins listed above.

Zero issues. They’re still great.

My OME 005 heavy springs are sagging. Not happy with that.
Add me to OME heavy sag gang. 😕

@LazarusTaxa I’m really surprised you got that metal “hat” fully seated onto the spring plate. Maybe because I run the heavies the spring pack is too thick.
 

LazarusTaxa

SILVER Star
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
356
Location
Bend, OR
I finally got the diffs finished up...

Before I glued on the loose carrier bearing, I stippled the carrier a bit with a punch. I read that this is a good way to slightly increase the interference as the punch marks push out a tiny bit of material when they create a crater. This seemed to help a bit as pressing the bearing on afterwards with the loctite 660 was slightly harder.

stipple.jpg


Once it was glued up I got everything reassembled and crushed down the crush sleeve. This one seemed a lot easier. I did most of the work with the press, but finished up with an impact I borrowed from my neighbor.

My final pattern on the rear for those interested (I ended up using only the factory shim of .053"):

final coast rear.jpg


final drive rear.jpg



FINALLY, the diffs are finished up and installed.. Feels good

diffs.jpg


diff in.jpg


Now I can get the knuckles and hubs together, axles in, and wheels on...
 

LazarusTaxa

SILVER Star
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
356
Location
Bend, OR
next step towards getting the wheels on this thing is getting the axles and hubs put back together. This was all pretty straightforward and for the most part everything went together as expected.

I did not use the knuckle centering tool and instead just reused the existing shims as I've seen others recommend. Using a fish scale, my preload wasn't quite into the FSM specs, but there was some and it felt OK.. I think my preload was ~2 lbs. and the FSM recommends 6-13 lbs.

Axles went in fine and I packed one tube of Valvoline Palladium in each side:

Grease.jpg



My main headache was getting the preload set properly on the hubs... I got a fish scale and was prepared to follow the FSM as with everything else, but that didn't seem to work.

The FSM states to torque the first hub nut down to ~43 ft lbs and then rotate the hub in either direction a few turns to seat the bearings and distribute the grease. Then, back off that nut till it's loose and use a scale to measure the rotating resistance of the seals (mine was ~2 lbs). Then, torque the first hub nut slightly (35-60 INCH pounds). Put on the star washer and then torque the outer hub nut to ~43 FT lbs... Then, the TOTAL resistance (resistance of the seals plus bearing preload) should be .9 - 7.3 lbs more than the initial resistance measured before.

My experience was that torquing the first hub nut to 35-60 in lbs was fine and left me with just the right amount of preload, but no matter what, when I torqued the outer hub nut to 40+ ft lbs my preload went through the roof.. Like way beyond my fish scale's 20 lb range.

The only way to end up with acceptable preload was for me to either not torque the outer nut past ~15-20 ft lbs, or to leave the inner nut loose. I figured that I dont want these nuts moving and having the outer one as tight as possible was best. So, I ended up leaving the inner nut a bit loose.. Like not even snugged down loose. Then with ~45-55 ft lbs of torque on the outer nut, I was left with 18-20 lbs of preload as measured by the fish scale (and which felt good for new bearings). I figure I'll keep a close eye on the hubs for the first few hundred miles and readjust as needed.

hub.jpg


Once that was decided everything else went together quickly.. Looks great:

finished.jpg


Putting everything back together is definitely the fun part.. Very satisfying to see all the planning, work, etc come together. It's all looking great:

hardware.jpg


Once I get the brake calipers and tie rods go on, I'll mark all the bolts.
 
Joined
Sep 29, 2004
Messages
2,329
Location
Houston, the lower bowel of TX
next step towards getting the wheels on this thing is getting the axles and hubs put back together. This was all pretty straightforward and for the most part everything went together as expected.

I did not use the knuckle centering tool and instead just reused the existing shims as I've seen others recommend. Using a fish scale, my preload wasn't quite into the FSM specs, but there was some and it felt OK.. I think my preload was ~2 lbs. and the FSM recommends 6-13 lbs.

Axles went in fine and I packed one tube of Valvoline Palladium in each side:

View attachment 2994503


My main headache was getting the preload set properly on the hubs... I got a fish scale and was prepared to follow the FSM as with everything else, but that didn't seem to work.

The FSM states to torque the first hub nut down to ~43 ft lbs and then rotate the hub in either direction a few turns to seat the bearings and distribute the grease. Then, back off that nut till it's loose and use a scale to measure the rotating resistance of the seals (mine was ~2 lbs). Then, torque the first hub nut slightly (35-60 INCH pounds). Put on the star washer and then torque the outer hub nut to ~43 FT lbs... Then, the TOTAL resistance (resistance of the seals plus bearing preload) should be .9 - 7.3 lbs more than the initial resistance measured before.

My experience was that torquing the first hub nut to 35-60 in lbs was fine and left me with just the right amount of preload, but no matter what, when I torqued the outer hub nut to 40+ ft lbs my preload went through the roof.. Like way beyond my fish scale's 20 lb range.

The only way to end up with acceptable preload was for me to either not torque the outer nut past ~15-20 ft lbs, or to leave the inner nut loose. I figured that I dont want these nuts moving and having the outer one as tight as possible was best. So, I ended up leaving the inner nut a bit loose.. Like not even snugged down loose. Then with ~45-55 ft lbs of torque on the outer nut, I was left with 18-20 lbs of preload as measured by the fish scale (and which felt good for new bearings). I figure I'll keep a close eye on the hubs for the first few hundred miles and readjust as needed.

View attachment 2994516

Once that was decided everything else went together quickly.. Looks great:

View attachment 2994517

Putting everything back together is definitely the fun part.. Very satisfying to see all the planning, work, etc come together. It's all looking great:

View attachment 2994518

Once I get the brake calipers and tie rods go on, I'll mark all the bolts.

Palladium inside the knuckle 👍 ....what did you use for the wheel bearings?
 

LazarusTaxa

SILVER Star
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
356
Location
Bend, OR
Were you able to find the plastic trim that accommodates the rear shoulder belts? I have an early '88 with only lap belts and I'd like to upgrade. A fellow mudder had them for $350 but it was a bit too rich for my blood.

Yeah, I got some from @FJ40GURU. Definitely not cheap... But gave me an opportunity to source a few other cool aussie things like an inclinometer and rear sliding windows.

Palladium inside the knuckle 👍 ....what did you use for the wheel bearings?

I used Valvoline fully synthetic moly fortified grease for the wheel and trunnion bearings: Moly-Fortified Gray Full Synthetic Grease - Valvoline - https://www.valvoline.com/en/full-synthetic-grease/
 

dogcruiser

SILVER Star
Joined
Aug 20, 2020
Messages
91
Location
Winter Park, FL

LazarusTaxa

SILVER Star
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
356
Location
Bend, OR
Maybe I just need to bite the bullet :)

Yeah... if it makes you feel any better, I got mine almost a year ago. Before that and since then I've kept my eye on CL and MUD classifieds and haven't seen another pair pop up.. They are rare and my guy knows it
 

LazarusTaxa

SILVER Star
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
356
Location
Bend, OR
Posting this here since it get a bit more visibility than my thread in the paint forum.

As those following know, I had planned on getting the bottom of my truck painted professionally. BUT, them changing their quote from "around $900" to $3,500 means I'll be doing this myself.

My plan is to lay down some epoxy primer (PPG DP90 or Omni?), then 3M urethane seam sealer, then primer over the seam sealer, and finally cover all that in raptor liner. By now i've got 95% of the undercoating stripped.. Just need to do the wheel wells and touch up the hard to reach corners, brackets, etc. I also need to fix the only real rust I've found in one of the rear wheel wells:

rust.jpg


Its right in the seam where the two panels come together. So, I'll get him to cut that part of the seam out and weld new metal in.. Should be quick and easy.

I'll first say that while it would be great if this looked nice, it's gonna be on the bottom of the truck and aesthetics are not my goal, or necessarily a big concern. Now, my question has to do with equipment needed to successfully lay down the primer and raptor liner.

I think I'll pickup one of the cheapo $15 harbor freight purple HVLP guns to use for the primer, and have ordered the raptor liner spray gun to use for that. But, I expect both need ~13 CFM @ 40-90 PSI to run. My finish nailing compressor aint gonna do that. And, even if I borrow my buddy's big box special and hook them together, I'll probably still be below 7-8 CFM.

I can rent a gas powered wheelbarrow style compressor with an 8 gal tank and that says it delivers 14 CFM. I know that with such small reserve capacity the compressor will run the whole time, but that should be plenty of volume to run the spray gun. I think my main concern is that with it running that much, the air might be hot and moisture can be a concern.

So for those who know, any suggestions are welcomed? will the gas compressor do the job?
 

LazarusTaxa

SILVER Star
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
356
Location
Bend, OR
I've been inching towards getting turning this frame into a rolling chassis. After I got the front knuckles and hubs together I focused on the rear axle.. Started by getting the brakes put together and cleaned up. The brake cylinders had clearly been replaced and the brakes overhauled very recently. The pads and drum were also hardly worn. I reused the cylinder, drum (repainted), and hardware, but did opt for new shoes just for the sake of being thorough..

The cylinders are crazy easy to "rebuild". It's basically taking a few things apart, cleaning them, and re-lubing with Toyota rubber grease:

drum brakes.jpg


I also got my bellcranks rebuilt and cleaned up with some new parts and freshly plated old parts:

bell cranks.jpg


Very cool that all these parts, especially the rubber covers, are still available new. Again, I coated the insides with rubber grease.

I cleaned up my old hardware and got new springs from a generic hardware kit picked up at my local auto parts store. I did replace the parking brake wire which had been kind of frayed.

finished.jpg


And then, finally, I could get my axles in and diff fully put together, and rear axle sealed up

axle in.jpg


done diff.jpg


PartNumberQuantity
Rubber grease08887-012061
Bell crank pivot e-ring90213-060132
Bell crank boot47633-350202
Bell crank springs90506-200334
Parking brake wire47616-600102
Brake drum retaining screws90113-100032
 

LazarusTaxa

SILVER Star
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
356
Location
Bend, OR
Like many things in life, this build often feels like two steps forward, one step backwards.. The last step to getting the wheels on was putting the steering links together. I painted my gearbox and new 555 rod ends and started pulling the hardware together only to find out that I apparently lost my TRE clamps. GREATTTTT. Now, gotta order those and wait on them. But, apparently there's only one TRE end clamp in the US, so I gotta wait on one from Japan.

Ok whatever, still tons of work to do. Just kind of annoying.. I like to see milestones completed.

In the meantime I switch to brake lines.. I want to get all this stuff done before the body goes on as I'd way rather do this kind of work standing up than laying on my back under a truck. I was going to reuse my existing lines as the lines themselves are actually in great shape.. No real rust on any of the lines themselves, but the nuts on the ends did have some surface rust (and I rounded over one or two getting them off).

I figured with the level of work going into everything else, it makes sense to just replace these now. After all, every other part of the braking system (except the pedal itself) will be new. So far I've ordered a new master, reman calipers, new pads, shoes, rotors, etc.

So I ordered some Nicopp line and M10 x 1 inverted flare fittings from AGS. I also got the fancy "fool proof" flaring tool from Eastwood because I've never made brake lines before, I'm redoing EVERY line on the truck, and I didn't want to have to worry about my flares not coming out correctly.

brake lines.jpg


And, I of course still had issues. I ran a bunch of tests and my flares all came out a little weird. The hole in the middle was ovular and the sides looked kind of crimped:

bad flare.jpg


After a bunch of testing and troubleshooting I came to the conclusion that this Nicopp line from AGS is just too soft.. The first stage in making an inverted flare is to essentially make a bubble flare. The second stage then presses that bubble flare into itself to make the cone of the inverted flare. So, it's important to make a good bubble flare to begin with.

I found that during that first step, instead of 'bubbling' out properly, the flare was kind of collapsing on itself, I think due to the line being too soft. Here you can see where the bubble has collapsed and the face become ovular:

bubble.jpg


Then, the second step seems to just crush all that together and the line being so soft, the tool effectively remolds it into the flare you see above.

It's definitely kind of frustrating as I specifically went out of my way to find good brake line and thought "Nicopp" name brand line (which i bought directly from the MFG) would be the best... But a deeper dive in google says others have also had issues with this line being too soft. So, maybe try a different brand.

In the end, I fixed the problem by performing the first step of making the bubble flare in two stages. I'd insert the line halfway to where it needed to be, start the bubble, and then insert it the rest of the way. This left a good bubble and ended up with a good flare (I think). Hopefully they don't all leak and I have to redo everything.

Other than the flares, working with the Nicopp line was great.. It bends super easily. I never even had to use any kind of a tool, just my hands. I got good tight clean bends each time.
 

g-man

SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 5, 2006
Messages
3,577
Location
Charlottesville VA
My main headache was getting the preload set properly on the hubs... I got a fish scale and was prepared to follow the FSM as with everything else, but that didn't seem to work.

The FSM states to torque the first hub nut down to ~43 ft lbs and then rotate the hub in either direction a few turns to seat the bearings and distribute the grease. Then, back off that nut till it's loose and use a scale to measure the rotating resistance of the seals (mine was ~2 lbs). Then, torque the first hub nut slightly (35-60 INCH pounds). Put on the star washer and then torque the outer hub nut to ~43 FT lbs... Then, the TOTAL resistance (resistance of the seals plus bearing preload) should be .9 - 7.3 lbs more than the initial resistance measured before.

My experience was that torquing the first hub nut to 35-60 in lbs was fine and left me with just the right amount of preload, but no matter what, when I torqued the outer hub nut to 40+ ft lbs my preload went through the roof.. Like way beyond my fish scale's 20 lb range.

The only way to end up with acceptable preload was for me to either not torque the outer nut past ~15-20 ft lbs, or to leave the inner nut loose. I figured that I dont want these nuts moving and having the outer one as tight as possible was best. So, I ended up leaving the inner nut a bit loose.. Like not even snugged down loose. Then with ~45-55 ft lbs of torque on the outer nut, I was left with 18-20 lbs of preload as measured by the fish scale (and which felt good for new bearings). I figure I'll keep a close eye on the hubs for the first few hundred miles and readjust as needed.

Hmmm, I'd go back and tighten ...(adjust the inner nut) to make the right tension. Also make sure you have no play axially in hub bearings. Like move the hub in and out a and make sure it's snug. Looks like the initial rotating resistance and the .9 -7.3 lbs with the fish scale should be measured BEFORE you put the second nut on, and after. And the second nut goes to 58ft/lbs. Don't do this right and the nuts come loose in 4wd, then you have bad stuff happening.

1652533073374.png
 

g-man

SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 5, 2006
Messages
3,577
Location
Charlottesville VA
The first nut is for setting the tension. the second nut is like a lock nut to keep the first from moving. Then the locking tabs on the washer lock them both together. Make sure that while you tighten the outer nut, friction between the nut and the locking washer are not turning the inner nut. Maybe make a mark at 12 oclock with whiteout or a silver sharpie to make sure it's not moving.
 

LazarusTaxa

SILVER Star
Joined
Jun 28, 2020
Messages
356
Location
Bend, OR
The first nut is for setting the tension. the second nut is like a lock nut to keep the first from moving. Then the locking tabs on the washer lock them both together. Make sure that while you tighten the outer nut, friction between the nut and the locking washer are not turning the inner nut. Maybe make a mark at 12 oclock with whiteout or a silver sharpie to make sure it's not moving.

I did do all that.. followed the FSM to a t.. greased the star washer and faces of the spindle nuts, etc.

No matter what, as soon as I torqued the outer nut down the preload would be so tight I could barely move the hub.

No idea what the deal is.. but, even now with my modified method, I think that if anything the preload is still a bit tight.

I'll put the wheels on and see how it feels and then just keep a super close eye on it and re adjust after a few miles.
 

Bullzi

SILVER Star
Joined
Mar 14, 2019
Messages
261
Location
Seattle
I did do all that.. followed the FSM to a t.. greased the star washer and faces of the spindle nuts, etc.

No matter what, as soon as I torqued the outer nut down the preload would be so tight I could barely move the hub.

No idea what the deal is.. but, even now with my modified method, I think that if anything the preload is still a bit tight.

I'll put the wheels on and see how it feels and then just keep a super close eye on it and re adjust after a few miles.

I had the exact same experience yesterday when I did mine. Followed the FSM to the letter…the preload with the first nut would be spot on and then every time I tightened the lock nut the preload went really high.
I kept the first nut a little looser than I would have liked (not loose, but good and hand tight) then torqued the lock nut to the proper torque and pinned the star washer. Final preload was around 14lbs. I’ll go back in there in about 100miles and make sure everything still looks good.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top Bottom