Preserving Patina - How To Tips and Tricks

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I’m really over the Boiled Linseed Oil to treat rusted metal. Fluid Film soaks in so much better.
Nolen did you try Penetrol to coat the rusted metal?



I’m working on a project that’s mostly patina paint but has bare steel on the tops of the roof and fenders, reading everything I can to see if there is a product that might last a few years on both steel and paint between touch up.

Have you looked into Ever Bright Coating? I’ve read that some guys are having good luck using it over the paint and steel but I can’t find any real world long-term reports. Restore Metal and Keep Metal Looking Its Best
 

wngrog

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Do you want the bare metal to look like it does pre treatment? If so, that’s why I like oils. It’s really easy to apply. Once it soaks in the first time it’s easy to reapply

I’ve not had to do it but you can wash it off for paint later.

I read that link. Looks like it will change the finish and be hard to get off.

Keep it simple is what this method is all about.
 
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Not to derail this thread, but do you have a build thread or link to more pics of this truck?
I don't have anything yet! I haven't done much to it, other than enjoy and drive it. I feel like if we do anything that might help the next person, I'll start a build thread, for sure!
 

bryson

I do stuff.
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If you like patina, just leave it alone and let it progress at natures rate. If you do anything to it, it does not look like natures work anymore.
Some patina = good
Too much patina = rusty junk

This thread is about trying to stay ahead of the rusty junk phase but still look as "natural" as possible...
 
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I actually have to commend the work that contributors of this thread made in developing an arsenal of techniques to reveal and protect what is already there on these amazing machines.

Beyond aesthetics, getting them some kind of waxy hydrocarbon to prevent further oxidation, is the name of the game, even without patina. Even, if it isn't for the body, it is so critical just to keep bolts and rivets from failing or seizing.
 
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New England
This thread is an amazing preservation resource for these machines. Thanks to all the contributors! So, I'm trying to preserve the undercarriage of what is a pretty clean 1990 FJ62. I bought an airless sprayer to apply a generous coat of Fluid-Film to everything on the bottom of this truck. and an Eastwood undercoating gun to get some of the cavities. Is there a general consensus as to how to prep for this? I have access to a dry-ice blaster and a media blaster, but I'm wondering what the best prep course is to set the stage for Fluid Film. There is minimal surface rust present, but there is a bit of road grime on a lot of stuff and oil deposits all over the place.

Thoughts on this?
 

wngrog

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What I have found is that Fluid Film does fine after just a simple pressure wash. It will soak in through dirt as well and THEN pressure wash it and it’s like a new black frame. Hose it down good with water.

Let it dry.

Coat it good with fluid film.

Drive it and use it. Repeat as needed. You will be shocked when you pressure wash it after it’s had fluid film on it a while at how black the metal is.
 
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Are you saying coat it with FF first, give it a little while to soak in, and then pressure wash and reapply the FF?

It's really funny being up here in CT, I am literally afraid of getting this truck wet. I think salt, and the new liquid corrosive they put on the roads is the real culprit, not the water, but the idea of pressure washing the undercarriage makes me shake a little. It seems easy enough though.


What I have found is that Fluid Film does fine after just a simple pressure wash. It will soak in through dirt as well and THEN pressure wash it and it’s like a new black frame. Hose it down good with water.

Let it dry.

Coat it good with fluid film.

Drive it and use it. Repeat as needed. You will be shocked when you pressure wash it after it’s had fluid film on it a while at how black the metal is.
 

wngrog

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It’s 100% the salt, water won’t hurt a thing under there. Don’t blast it. Just wash it.
The FF creeps and soaks in.

You can just do it without a wash too. Whatever you want, just don’t media blast the paint off
 
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