Power Steering Pump and Hose Replacement - FAQ

Romer

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Let me first state the fact that I am doing this FAQ does not make me an expert on this. In fact, I had no clue how to do this job before I started. There was some good information on here, but not the whole story. So I decided to do the FAQ item while I did the work.

It was similar for the Front Axle. Never had done one before. What you see in that thread is my first Front Axle job that took me 2 and a half days to do. I used what I learned along with other threads and peoples partial write-ups. I have since done 3 Front Axle jobs and can do it in under 12 hours. A pro can do it in less than 8 and probably closer to 4.

There was a lot of good information here and I even had to ask for help while doing this.

The reason for all this Blah Blah Blah is that this isn't me going off and showing you how to do this job. This is the resources of this forum that has been compiled from mine and others experience in this job. The point here is if you are about to do something and you don't see the full story of what you need, then you can create an FAQ item to so others can learn from your experience.
 
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Romer

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So how do I know if thats what I need to do

The Power Steering system will leak for quite a while without causing any issue or even drops on the garage floor.

By the time the drops start coming, the entire drivers side of the lower engine compartment could all be caked in grease with wet spots below. It's really hard to tell what the problem is.

Like for any leak, you need to clean the area so you can then see the source of the leak. I had a good guess that it was the pump before I hosed it down. It had the classic rear seal leak.

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So I cleaned up the area and watched it for a few days

The below clean shot will help orient you to where the pump is below the alternator

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Ken, if your pump is leaking your high and low pressure hoses are not far behind.

So I called our local parts man and ordered a new Pump, O- ring, Gasket (metal bracket like) and a new High Pressure Hose and return line.

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44320-60182 New Pump
90301-73004 O-Ring
44327-30030 Gasket
44411-60430 High Pressure Hose

The return line usually comes with the cooler, so I got the hose for another vehicle of similar length

44412-28160


Lots of people will rebuild the pump rather than buy a new one. Its much cheaper (about $200 cheaper).

The pump is easy to rebuild, I have used both the Gates brand ~$15 and dealer ~$45 kits with good results. The kits are just a shaft seal and a few o-rings.

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I wanted to replace mine with a new one as this was my first time and wanted to one less thing to worry about. I will then rebuild this one following the write-up below and use it on my daughters 80.

Here is a step by step write-up on rebuilding the pump and the much more expensive (~$2K new) gear box My Gear box was fine so I left it alone.

From what I have read here the problem is typically the pump and/or hoses.
 
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Romer

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Tools - What is needed and prep

One of the nice thing about working on your truck is HAVING to go out and buy some new tools. I did not have the required 12 point set of sockets, a gear puller or a 17 MM Flare wrench.

You will also need a set of metric sockets. I just used the 12 -points I bought. A torque wrench, Impact wrench (Air gun), pliers a hammer and new Power Steering Fluid, I used synthetic.

Preparation to make this easier is to remove the battery and battery tray, and skid plate.

If its about time to change your oil, consider combining the job as it will be easier to do without the oil Filter. I had just changed the oil so I elected to leave the filter in place.

Place a drip pan below the Power Steering Pump.

I also used my Brake bleeder to remove as much fluid as I could before starting.

Oh, make sure you are prepared for step #6, I like to do that step with a Cigar when I am working on the truck.
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Romer

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I printed out cruiserdans write-up on R&Ring the pump and used it as a guide. He did not replace the hose's

I have supplied several power steering pumps to board members over the last few years but I do not recall any of them detailing the actual replacement.

Mine has been seeping out the back cover for some time now and I decided that I wanted to replace it in preparation for our annual trip to Cruise Moab.

I respectfully submit my observations regarding this job:

Preparation:
Have on hand a new pump, body o-ring, high pressure gaskets and a quart of PS fluid.
In addition, a well-stocked tool box with metric tools, torque wrenches and a gear puller is a must.

I started by removing the high-pressure line banjo-bolt. This requires a 22mm socket, a wobbly and enough extensions to get your ratchet/breaker bar hooked up so that you clear the battery box.
In my case the high pressure port broke loose from the pump body before the banjo bolt let go and as a result I had to head back to the tool box. I selected a 13/16 open-end wrench and fitted it to the high pressure port so that I could hold it in place as I broke the banjo-bolt loose. After I removed the banjo-bolt I removed the return hose that goes from the reservoir to the pump outlet. I used Vicegrips to compress the clamps that retain the hose.
The next step involves removing the nuts (2) that retain the pump. I used a 14mm socket and a long breaker-bar to break the nuts loose. I got the lower one from under the vehicle and the upper one from the engine compartment. I then removed the nuts.

The pump comes out from under the vehicle. Once is has been removed it is necessary to remove the gear from the pump shaft. I used a 17mm socket and an impact wrench to remove the nut. I then used a two jaw puller to remove the gear from the pump shaft. I ended up using my impact wrench to rattle the puller enough to pop the gear off.
After the gear was removed I transfered the gear and key to the new pump. I used my impact wrench to install the nut on the shaft (torque spec 54lbft). I then installed a new o-ring to the pump body and re-installed the pump from under the vehicle.

The pump attaching nuts are torqued to 27lbft. At this point I reinstalled the return hose from the reservoir to the pump and I added some fluid until it started to come out of the high-pressure port and the hose. At that point I reinstalled the highpressure line with a new gasket.
I then torqued the banjo bolt to 54lbft and added enough fluid to get close to the line.
Next step is to start the engine and check for leaks. Turn the wheel side-to-side several times to bleed air out and heat the system. Add fluid to the correct level and congratulate yourself on a job well done.......


D-

EDIT NOTE:

The 17mm nut retaining the pump gear requires a 12 point socket.

I held the gear with a gloved hand (very heavy leather) when I rattled the nut off and on. It is possible to put the gear in a soft-jawed vice and use a breaker bar but I prefer not to subject the teeth to that stress. The impact makes quick work of the nut. It would be impossible to hold the gear by hand and remove the nut with a hand wrench.

Since I was also doing the hose, I removed the Battery Tray for better access.

You need to also remove the skid plate to get to the bracket holding the high pressure hose. Careful, if the hose has been leaking there will be oil collected on the skid plate
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Romer

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Using vice grips or pliers, get the clamp off the lower part of the hose so you can take the hose off the pump. Leave the top one alone unless you are also replacing this hose.

Like stated earlier, now is a good time to change your oil because the position of the filter makes it challenging to get to the top nut. However, I have the small filter and using extensions was able to run the extensions under the filter with the wrench to the right. This worked, but leaves less space to use the wrench.

Like Dan said, you do the top nut from the top and the bottom nut from underneath. After loosening the nuts, I was able to get them off by hand

I then tapped on the pump lightly with a hammer to loosen it and then pulled it off from the underside.
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Romer

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I followed Dan's advice with the impact wrench and the leather glove. Took a few tries. I also used a towel to help with the grip as the gear will want to spin with the impact wrench.

This is where you REQUIRE the 17mm 12 point socket to fit the nut on the gear.

Then use your gear puller to pull the gear off the shaft
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Romer

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Now you move the gear to the new pump. You need to torque the bolt to 54 ft-lbs like Dan said. I used a towel and then a channel lock to hold the gear in place while I first used the impact wrench and then torqued the nut down. The towel was to protect the gears.

I then set the O-ring in place.

Now the pump is ready to back in the truck.
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Romer

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Next I removed the high pressure Hose by first removing the fitting from the top of the gear box.

Makes sure you are using a 17mm FLARE wrench. Don't be cheating with a combination wrench or worse yet an adjustable. It should spin right out of there. I'd try and save the fittings, then a hose shop can make you up a new hose to carry as a spare.

If your not going to rebuild the hose and have trouble with the flare, you can cut the hose (make sure you do the right one) leaving enough tubing to get a deep socket on it. The correct fitting is the one closer to the drivers fender in the first picture. A regular wrench is used to show which fitting.

You will need th Flare wrench to get the new hose on properly.

Good thing I changed the hose, it was also leaking and you cant see that spot easily when its installed.
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Romer

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Now you put the pump back on the studs from underneath the vehicle.

It is easy for the O-ring to become dislodged so be very careful and make sure it is sitting correctly as you put it back on.

I then put a nut on the bottom bolt and partially tightened, Then did the top nut which pulled the pump to be properly seated and torqued the top nut, then torqued (27 ft-lbs) the bottom nut.

Then install the new high pressure hose first with the bracket. I then added the metal gasket (was copper washers in original setup)

The gasket is a double aluminum washer connected by a bridge. That goes at the banjo bolt on the pump, and replaces the stock copper washers.

Then torqued the Banjo bolt down to 54 ft-lbs
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Romer

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Place the other end in the Power Steering Gear box and tighten with the 17MM flare wrench.

Re-attach the hose and move the clamp back from the Reservoir to the power steering pump if you haven't

Now re-install the skid plate and battery tray and battery.

Your ready to add fluid and bleed the system

Two methods of bleeding the system and you can actually do both.

The first one needs to be done before you put the banjo bolt back on and will end up making a small mess.

I think the key is adding fluid before the high pressure line is reinstalled on the pump. It is a bit messy but is gets the pump primed and reduces the ammount of trapped air dramaticly.

Here is an alternative method but takes longer

to bleed, do this: fill the system to proper capacity, jack up the front end, slowly turn wheel from lock to lock about 10 times (engine off). Watch the fluid level to make sure you don't suck in more air. Put the lid back on lightly and let it sit for an hour or so. Repeat this process like 3 times. Have a friend watch and once you get to the point where there are no air bubbles coming up in the reservoir and the fluid level remains constant, you can be pretty sure you've bled it properly. It should be OK to drop it and start the engine now. Turn the wheel lock to lock a couple times and listen for moaning.

It should be noted that while you are turning the wheel side to side power steering fluid will be coming out of the top of the res. They way I did this was jacked up the front, but the key to acc and stood outside the vehicle keeping an eye on the top of the res, when fluid started to come up to the lip - Stop, wait a few seconds and do it some more. Remember to keep checking fluid levels.

Now In between bleeding exercises is a good step 6 opportunity
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Romer

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Now drive it and check for leaks. and check the fluid level a few times over the next couple of days.

Now is the opportunity for others who have done this to add their knowledge to this FAQ. Also, please point out corrections or additions I should make above.

Sure looks a lot nicer than before

Note: In the bottom picture the High Pressure line to the gear box isn't fully screwed down. I did not have a 17mm flare wrench at the time so I just snugged it up and then went to the parts store to get a wrench to finish the job.


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Thanks for posting this, especially the pics w/ part nos. Had my PSP replaced at Thanksgiving. Only 2 parts are on the invoice:
44320-60182, described as PUMP ASSY, VANE L, and an unspecified amount of PS fluid. Nothing for O-rings or gaskets. Could there be more than one version of that part number? It's hard to believe that they wouldn't have been replaced on a 96 FZJ80 w/192,000 miles, especially when it had puked ps fluid all over the place.

bootfoot
 
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This is an awesome thread I have been looking for one like this!!! If I just wanted to do a rebuild and just replace the gaskets. How difficult is that compared to what you did...
 
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one more time to refresh my memory....... the high pressure line only comes with a pump assembly right? You can't just buy the hose? IF the hose is all you need, you can have one made, correct?
 

Romer

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Bootfoot- I bet they replaced the O-ring is only a couple of bucks

deputy630 - I didn't do the rebuild and it would be all the steps I posted plus those in the rebuild thread I linked to

Concretejungle - The High pressure line does not come with the pump. The return line normally comes as part of the cooler assembly, but Dan gave me a Toyota part number for anther vehicles hose that works
 
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cruiserdan

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Thanks for posting this, especially the pics w/ part nos. Had my PSP replaced at Thanksgiving. Only 2 parts are on the invoice:
44320-60182, described as PUMP ASSY, VANE L, and an unspecified amount of PS fluid. Nothing for O-rings or gaskets. Could there be more than one version of that part number? It's hard to believe that they wouldn't have been replaced on a 96 FZJ80 w/192,000 miles, especially when it had puked ps fluid all over the place.

bootfoot


They either re-used the o-ring and high pressure gaskets (my bet because they probably forgot to order them) or they forgot to bill them.
 

Romer

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A follow up comment. You have to take the big hose from the resv to the pump off. The toyota clamp sucks and there was a slight leak there still, so I replaced it with a standard hose clamp.
 
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I wanted to add a couple of follow-up comments as well.

1) Be sure to disconnect your battery. For those with the stock alternator, maybe this is not an issue. I have upgraded my alternator to a sequoia alternatior and used photoman's bracket. This places the power terminal right above the 22 MM nut holding the high pressure hose in place. When i went to put my wobble socket down i touched the terminal and had a nice spark shoot up.

2) a "flare" wrench is also known as a line wrench. I had no idea what the heck a flare wrench was, but had some brake line wrenches. THat is what Romer and Drew are talking about.

Just FYI. I'm replacing both hoses right now and i'll try to add anything that i noticed not pointed out in this write-up.
 

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