Builds PLC build

Discussion in 'HardCore Corner' started by FF LC FREAK, Jun 17, 2018.

  1. boots4

    boots4

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    You got this. Looking forward to seeing this in person.
     
  2. FF LC FREAK

    FF LC FREAK

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    Version 2.0

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    Painted and installed with 18 hours to spare!

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    mr jits, 74fj40, boots4 and 1 other person like this.
  3. FF LC FREAK

    FF LC FREAK

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    It's been awhile!

    Cruisin the Woods went well, but unfortunately, I didn't really get to wheel - long story. Boots and I were able to hit a couple of quick trails on our way out to our checkpoint on Saturday, but they weren't that hard. However, everything worked great! The only thing I wasn't happy with was my gearing. I really noticed it on steep downhills with the auto tranny. It took a lot of braking to go as slow as I wanted. 1st gear low range isn't slow enough. It puts an Orion pretty high on my list. It was originally on my list at the beginning of this build, but as costs kept mounting, it dropped off for the time being.

    I've been daily driving this lately. Yesterday I drove about 150 freeway miles at 70-75 mph. Steering and suspension worked great. It is as stable as can be at those speeds.

    My brakes recently started squealing a little bit. I checked the fronts, and the pads were good. The rear drums needed adjustment. When I pulled off the drums, I found 2 weeping wheel cylinders - 1 on each side. I rebuilt them a couple of years ago. That's when I said enough is enough. I'm tired of adjusting the drums and dealing with wheel cylinders. A quick PM and phone call to @Poser, and a package showed up in the mail a few days later. A couple of days later, I got a package from Rock Auto with calipers.

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    Thanks Steve!

    Now I just need to find the time to install them.
     
  4. archie73

    archie73

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    Can you let us know the full cost of the rear disc conversion? I’m debating on putting an ARB in the back and considered doing the rear disc while I had the shafts pulled. Thanks
     
  5. 74fj40

    74fj40

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    Awesome! Did steve recommend a proportioning valve? I know that I don’t have one and I can lock up my rear discs in a panic braking
     
  6. FF LC FREAK

    FF LC FREAK

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    This is the list that Steve gave me:

    Caliper brackets and mounting hardware are 86.00us

    Modified/machined and ready to go rotors are 45.00us each, 90.00us for the pair.

    Caliper hoses/banjo bolts/copper sealing washers are 36.00us each, 72.00us for the pair.

    Tombstone hose mounting tabs and clips are 8.00us each, 16.00us for the pair.

    Rear axle seals are 10.00us each, 20.00us for the pair.

    Diff cover gaskets are 10.00us each.


    I bought 2 calipers from Rock Auto for ~$32 each (core included since I didn't have cores to begin with). Pads are $25ish.

    All told, it's not cheap, but not having to mess with drums anymore will be priceless!


    Yes, he did say I should add a proportioning valve. I already have a variable/adjustable one, so I didn't include it in the cost above.

    I'm looking forward to getting these installed, but my schedule is pretty full until about mid November. Then I'll have some time to tear back into this project.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2018
  7. SuperBuickGuy

    SuperBuickGuy

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    proportioning valves, if the vehicle is all drum to begin with - you should try without the valve (or all disk for that matter) All adjustable proportioning valves reduce the flow by 40% then up to 90% (this depends on the manufacturer to some degree) with the turn of the knob. Not all vehicles need it, for example, drum/drum systems can already reduce the flow at the master cylinder by simply having a smaller exit hole in the body... add 40-90% reduce and you'll wonder why, even after you holed (took the guts out) of the proportioning valve that you're still having trouble getting the back brakes to work.

    Another cheap fix is adjust the system with different types of pads front and rear - in general, longer-life-pads are harder, so if you, say, want to stop the rear from locking up, put the cheapest pads you can find on the front and longer life on the back if that first adjust needs more (read, shortest warranty) the front will brake harder and then you won't be locking up brakes as often....

    On my fj40 - no proportioning valve, all disk.... I've never locked the rears up. On my Corvettes, I don't use proportioning valves because it's really not needed - ESPECIALLY since those valves can have trouble if they get overheated (which happens on race cars and never on the street).... in case you're curious, I use dual cylinders with an adjustable rod between the two masters to adjust front/rear bias... and rarely move it off center.
     
  8. FF LC FREAK

    FF LC FREAK

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    I've been super busy with lots of different things lately (travelling for work, house projects, etc), so I have had very little time to work on my 40. Unfortunately, that seems to be happening a lot more often lately. However, I did make it up to our club's annual Christmas Tree Run this past weekend. We spent a few hours playing in the snow.

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    Unfortunately, while driving down the freeway heading to the meetup point, I heard and felt a loud bang from the rear end. Immediately, I had a vibration and a whirring noise. I got out and checked around but didn't see anything. It didn't get any worse as I drove, so I decided to continue on. I made it through the whole day with no other problems.

    I had a couple of hours this morning to take a look. I pulled off the diff cover and immediately saw the problem. The 2 bolts that hold the cross pin in place backed out, sheared off and let the cross pin slide out. I guess I never felt the bolts shearing off. The loud bang was from the cross pin hitting the pinion. That hardened shaft didn't do the pinion gear any favors when it hit.

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    It took a nice chunk out of the air line.

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    Hard to see, but the pinion gear is chipped and gouged in the above picture.

    I'm going to pull the third and get a better idea of damage. Obviously, I'll need some new parts for the locker. I'm hoping that I don't have to replace the ring and pinion. If it's salvageable, I'll swap it to the front. And while I have everything apart, I'll swap in the rear disk brakes.
     
    GLTHFJ60 likes this.
  9. boots4

    boots4

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    Ouch. It's pretty amazing you drove around the rest of the day on that. Hopefully some file work will clean up the gears and red lock-tight for everything.
     
    GLTHFJ60 likes this.
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