Brake System Repair (1 Viewer)

Joined
Feb 23, 2015
Messages
876
Location
Simpsonville,SC
A boot blew out on the outboard side of the front passenger brake caliper resulting a depressurization of the braking system. Fortunately enough meat remained on the pads to prevent the pistons fromblowing out. We discovered upon stripping everything down that the inboard calipers were completely seized up, the brake lines are badly dry-rotted, and the inverted flare nuts on the hard lines are also frozen. The hard lines were damaged upon removal of the soft lines. The driver’s side was slightly better.

While I usually opt to rebuild calipers this one was too badly rusted to be salvaged in my garage. I felt like a criminal turning these in as a core.

This truck is badly rusted. I knew all this when I bought it for $1,500 three years ago - with 163,000 miles on the clock. What money was saved back then is now being spent addressing this badly deteriorated braking system.

Would you make your own hard lines from stainless or copper nickel (3/16 tubing)? Would you use the stainless inverted flare nuts, of the zinc coated (m10x1.0)? What tool do you like for the double flare?

I have to say @cruiseroutfit has been tremendously helpful, and may have some of these hard lines in stock. Thanks Kurt.

Also has anyone used the Eastwood flare tool? It’s a good looking tool for flaring that could also be useful when I’m building/rebuilding espresso machines - so that’s tempting, but it’s also spendy.
 
Joined
Feb 8, 2015
Messages
666
Location
Eastern Washington
If you have all the tools already and are familiar with how to build your own lines that would be a good way to go. I'd go stainless everything myself. If you don't have the tools and experience seems like you'd ahead in time and money just buying pre bent replacements if available. If you're concerned about rust on the factory steel lines there are products like Fluid Film that will help stave that off.

I don't have the eastwood flare tool but have bought other special tools from them and not been disappointed.
 
Joined
Jun 26, 2004
Messages
1,894
Location
east coast Canada
Copper nickel, easy to work with and pretty much corrosion proof. Regular brake flaring tools will also work, with ss regular tools often won’t work.
 

SNLC

OCD
Supporting Vendor
Joined
Sep 9, 2004
Messages
7,102
Location
Boise - Idaho
NiCopp hard line is easy to work with.

Stainless always lasts longer than zinc.

I have a hydraulic flaring tool that can be used on the vehicle. The Eastwood one works nice too.

You can get remanned calipers from Toyota for cheap.

Cheers
 
Joined
Feb 23, 2015
Messages
876
Location
Simpsonville,SC
NiCopp hard line is easy to work with.

Stainless always lasts longer than zinc.

I have a hydraulic flaring tool that can be used on the vehicle. The Eastwood one works nice too.

You can get remanned calipers from Toyota for cheap.

Cheers

When I called they were $150 per axle so remans were purchased from Napa instead. However rebuild kits for the parts drawer were ordered from Toyota - gotta get ‘em while they’re still available. I figure Napa’s calipers are Toyota calipers rebuilt using Napa materials. If they fail they’ll get refreshed using Toyota materials. My dealership is crazy expensive for some of these parts.

I went ahead with the stainless lines. It looks like only three need replacing. The local dealership parts guy reported that these are NLA from Toyota. It’s been a real treat double-flaring and bending new stainless brake lines. It’s less intuitive than it first appears.
 

SNLC

OCD
Supporting Vendor
Joined
Sep 9, 2004
Messages
7,102
Location
Boise - Idaho
When I called they were $150 per axle so remans were purchased from Napa instead. However rebuild kits for the parts drawer were ordered from Toyota - gotta get ‘em while they’re still available. I figure Napa’s calipers are Toyota calipers rebuilt using Napa materials. If they fail they’ll get refreshed using Toyota materials. My dealership is crazy expensive for some of these parts.

I went ahead with the stainless lines. It looks like only three need replacing. The local dealership parts guy reported that these are NLA from Toyota. It’s been a real treat double-flaring and bending new stainless brake lines. It’s less intuitive than it first appears.


Stealership is screwing you.


Cheers
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top Bottom