Bought the wrong range torque wrench. Should I keep it? (1 Viewer)

Joined
Sep 13, 2007
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Seacoast NH
 
 
I flubbed up the part number when I was placing the order for a new torque wrench and mistakenly got one that spans the range from 10 to 50 inch/lbs. (by the way, emaxaction.com had the lowest prices I could find on CDI [aka Snap-On] wrenches and the shipping was fast and customer support was helpful).

As this (and most other) torque wrenches are only certified for the top 80% of full scale, this means that the usable range for this wrench is 18 to 50 inch/lbs (about 1.5 to 4.2 foot/lbs).

At $130 for the wrench, I can think of better places to spend my money (especially as I'm currently replacing the HG) and am thinking about exchanging it for one with a more common range. However, if anyone thinks that it may be handy to keep around, I will reconsider.

Pretty much the only jobs I do that would call for a torque wrench would be working on the cruiser and my old 1988 Kawasaki Ninja 500.

So, after that wordy intro, should I keep the 10-50 in/lb wrench or send it back? Is there anything on a cruiser that calls out such a low torque spec?

Thanks!
 
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I just finished my HG and I can tell you 13-15 ft-lbs was used the most. I have never needed anything that small in my limited wrenching career. If you work on cars, the only thing I would GUESS that you would use it for would be pre-load of pinion gears. Bite the bullet and send it back.
 

sandcruiser

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trade it. It won't do you any good and, as you said, that money could be spent somewhere else.
 

wxm

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I would probably trade it with one around 10-100 ft-lb range if this is the only one you plan to buy. That's said I had used the 50 in-lb on my starter rebuild, and I believe there are some usages for parts rebuild (although the guys here might not think it is necessary to use torque wrench for such application).
 

helocat

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Na not much use in the inch lbs range. Get a digital 3/8” unit that converts to inch lbs if you need it. This is what I rock here at the shop when I need inch lbs.

Mark
 

TrickyT

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I'd trade it. I have the CDI 1503MFRMH (20-150 ft/lbs) which I'm very happy with. I think you'd only rarely use the one you've got now.
 
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You would only need such a small scale if you wanted to deal with differentials. I got the Park Tools TW-1 (0-60 inch pounds). But for general wrenching you need a torque wrench with a broader scale.
 
Joined
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It always seems like threads about tools get quick and plentiful responses and this one is no exception; thanks for all of your replies!

You have solidified my decision to send the 10-50 in/lb wrench back and I will do so today.

In its place, I have bought two wrenches:

Husky 39102 25-250, in/lb (certified range of 70-250 in/lb or 5.8 to 20.8 ft/lb)

Snap-On TECH2FR100, 5-100 ft/lb (certified range of 24-100 ft/lb)

However, I may sell the Husky and get a CDI 3002LDIN 0-300 in/lb (certified range of 60-300 in/lb or 5-25 ft/lb) as this wrench will span the missing range from 20.0-23.9 ft/lb that the Husky/Snap-On combination misses.

The CDI 3002LDIN is a dial wrench and that would require you to watch the torque value and stop yourself at the desired torque (tell me if I'm wrong here). I think I would prefer the "click" type wrench as you don't have to be looking at the display as you are wrenching; which can be difficult in some positions.

Picture 1 - Husky
Picture 2 - Snap-On
Picture 3 - CDI

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Last edited:
Joined
Jul 14, 2004
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on the right coast
 
 
 
It always seems like threads about tools get quick and plentiful responses and this one is no exception; thanks for all of your replies!

You have solidified my decision to send the 10-50 in/lb wrench back and I will do so today.

In its place, I have bought two wrenches:

Husky 39102 25-250, in/lb (certified range of 70-250 in/lb or 5.8 to 20.8 ft/lb)

Snap-On TECH2FR100, 5-100 ft/lb (certified range of 24-100 ft/lb)

However, I may sell the Husky and get a CDI 3002LDIN 0-300 in/lb (certified range of 60-300 in/lb or 5-25 ft/lb) as this wrench will span the missing range from 20.0-23.9 ft/lb that the Husky/Snap-On combination misses.

The CDI 3002LDIN is a dial wrench and that would require you to watch the torque value and stop yourself at the desired torque (tell me if I'm wrong here). I think I would prefer the "click" type wrench as you don't have to be looking at the display as you are wrenching; which can be difficult in some positions.

Picture 1 - Husky
Picture 2 - Snap-On
Picture 3 - CDI

.

CDI makes good quality torque wrenches and that's what we used in the military.
 

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