Selectable diff locker debate (aftermarket).

landtank

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Cool but why Kaiser vs ARB?
because Kaiser allows the wheels to rotate at different speeds and delivers torque based on each tires individual RPM.

Lets say you are fully locked and taking a left hand turn. So the rear left wheel travels the shortest distance, then the left front tire, right rear tire and finally the right front tire

ARB, all 4 tires are linked and trying to turn at the same speed causing drive line binding and if you are on pavement, tires chirping and hard steering as the truck wants to only go straight.

Kaiser, all 4 tires rotate at different speeds and the torque supplied is proportional to each tire's RPM
 
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because Kaiser allows the wheels to rotate at different speeds and delivers torque based on each tires individual RPM.

Lets say you are fully locked and taking a left hand turn. So the rear left wheel travels the shortest distance, then the left front tire, right rear tire and finally the right front tire

ARB, all 4 tires are linked and trying to turn at the same speed causing drive line binding and if you are on pavement, tires chirping and hard steering as the truck wants to only go straight.

Kaiser, all 4 tires rotate at different speeds and the torque supplied is proportional to each tire's RPM
Thanks you. Makes sense and really appreciate the explanation.
 

Dave 2000

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Looking at the first paragraph with the broken ring and pinion, did the OP not know the 80 is weak in this area, in particular in reverse?

I had ARB's front and rear in my competition built Land Rover Discovery (see avatar), I put them in circa 2007? The car was to be a DD with competition use every couple of weekends, and the ARB's got worked.....hard! Whilst I could have purchased any of the other brands around at the time I was concerned with mentions of road manners in particular of the front differentials. So ARB it was, IIRC one problem was the over pressuring (mentioned above in an earlier post), a small compressor regulator sorted that. IMO. most of the ARB issues are due to poor installation.

In other words, if my 80 did not have the factory versions it would have ARB's without question.

Regards

Dave
 
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because Kaiser allows the wheels to rotate at different speeds and delivers torque based on each tires individual RPM.

Lets say you are fully locked and taking a left hand turn. So the rear left wheel travels the shortest distance, then the left front tire, right rear tire and finally the right front tire

ARB, all 4 tires are linked and trying to turn at the same speed causing drive line binding and if you are on pavement, tires chirping and hard steering as the truck wants to only go straight.

Kaiser, all 4 tires rotate at different speeds and the torque supplied is proportional to each tire's RPM
That sounds more like a limited slip differential than a locker to me. Which is fine, I quite like them actually, but a locker is a different tool IMO, one with a very narrow and specific application.
 

mudgudgeon

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Kaiser, all 4 tires rotate at different speeds and the torque supplied is proportional to each tire's RPM

So, like an open diff?

Wheel not spinning gets zero torque, wheel spinning receives full torque
 
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So, like an open diff?

Wheel not spinning gets zero torque, wheel spinning receives full torque
I googled it, and it sounds like it has some kind of gear-based limiter, so more like a limited slip diff than an open diff, but yeah, not really a locker from my point of view. Surely the slipping wheel is still going to spin much faster, eating power and limiting torque to the wheel with traction.
 

Broski

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because Kaiser allows the wheels to rotate at different speeds and delivers torque based on each tires individual RPM.

Lets say you are fully locked and taking a left hand turn. So the rear left wheel travels the shortest distance, then the left front tire, right rear tire and finally the right front tire

ARB, all 4 tires are linked and trying to turn at the same speed causing drive line binding and if you are on pavement, tires chirping and hard steering as the truck wants to only go straight.

Kaiser, all 4 tires rotate at different speeds and the torque supplied is proportional to each tire's RPM
Perfect for over-landing !!
There's a reason professional rock crawlers choose selectable lockers.
 

landtank

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not a limited slip as I stated the torque applied is proportional to tire rotation.

there are plenty of profesionals that use Kaisers around the work in all types of competition. From drag racing to rock crawling. If you think everything on a competition build is solely chosen on being the best and not from companies funding the team you are mistaken.

the biggest problem with forward movement, component failure and maneuverability is drive line bind.
 
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not a limited slip as I stated the torque applied is proportional to tire rotation.

there are plenty of profesionals that use Kaisers around the work in all types of competition. From drag racing to rock crawling. If you think everything on a competition build is solely chosen on being the best and not from companies funding the team you are mistaken.

the biggest problem with forward movement, component failure and maneuverability is drive line bind.
Isn't that the idea behind selectable lockers? The driver controls locking/unlocking depending on the situation.
 
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in the middle of a climb?
Why not? I've done it many times. I always unlock as soon as they're not needed. Well, I should clarify that I did that all the time with ARBs. Not so much with factory lockers, but they're pretty much just a PITA regardless of terrain. I'll never make that mistake again.
 

baldilocks

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Looking at the first paragraph with the broken ring and pinion, did the OP not know the 80 is weak in this area, in particular in reverse?

I had ARB's front and rear in my competition built Land Rover Discovery (see avatar), I put them in circa 2007? The car was to be a DD with competition use every couple of weekends, and the ARB's got worked.....hard! Whilst I could have purchased any of the other brands around at the time I was concerned with mentions of road manners in particular of the front differentials. So ARB it was, IIRC one problem was the over pressuring (mentioned above in an earlier post), a small compressor regulator sorted that. IMO. most of the ARB issues are due to poor installation.

In other words, if my 80 did not have the factory versions it would have ARB's without question.

Regards

Dave
The OP runs his rig hard since he got it in 2014. The op is well aware of the fact that the front diff is more vulnerable in reverse. The OP is willing to pay in order to play. This thread is a discussion about selectable lockers, specifically the ARB, the Harrop, and the TJM not my ring and pinion, and not auto lockers that work like limited slips.

This thread started off very good and could serve future 80 owners who take the initiative to seek out the information that are looking for.
 

Dave 2000

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The OP runs his rig hard since he got it in 2014. The op is well aware of the fact that the front diff is more vulnerable in reverse. The OP is willing to pay in order to play. This thread is a discussion about selectable lockers, specifically the ARB, the Harrop, and the TJM not my ring and pinion, and not auto lockers that work like limited slips.

This thread started off very good and could serve future 80 owners who take the initiative to seek out the information that are looking for.
Exactly! If he works his vehicle hard, and the ARB'S have worked flawlessly for 12 or more years then why ask the question?

You missed my point completely.....never mind.

Regards

Dave
 

baldilocks

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Exactly! If he works his vehicle hard, and the ARB'S have worked flawlessly for 12 or more years then why ask the question?

You missed my point completely.....never mind.

Regards

Dave
You didn’t read the opening post did you?
 
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in the middle of a climb?

I havent encountered a climb in Colorado or Utah where I couldnt just turn the locker on, do the clumb and then turn it off at the top. If I decided not to use the locker and somehow needed it half way up, you just turn it on...

To your earlier post, I dont know many people making a lot of turns while fully locked so driveline bind is pretty moot. I spend most of my trips in Moab unlocked until I'm actually at an obstacle which are almost all straight up and over.
 
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I havent encountered a climb in Colorado or Utah where I couldnt just turn the locker on, do the clumb and then turn it off at the top. If I decided not to use the locker and somehow needed it half way up, you just turn it on...

To your earlier post, I dont know many people making a lot of turns while fully locked so driveline
 
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My take away thus far from the info and opinions given is that, provided the selectable locker of choice is set up correctly as advertised, the ARB and TJM would be the most “solidly locked” experience. With that said, I have front and rear Eaton e-lockers and have had nothing but a great experience. Locks seeming instantaneously, perhaps very minimally perceived tire roll and unlocks in same manner. I can say that I don’t hard rock crawl or haven’t yet so can’t comment on a situation where the Eatons would be disadvantageous. I spend a lot of time in sub freezing winter conditions, in fact am now, and I had a thoughts of concern when researching locker options regarding the air compressor introducing moisture into the air lines and possibly freezing rendering air operated lockers inoperable. I could be way off base here as I’ve read nothing about that scenario but if it’s a real possibility, then for me, air lockers become a no go. Just my thoughts and a couple cents.
 
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I had a thoughts of concern when researching locker options regarding the air compressor introducing moisture into the air lines and possibly freezing rendering air operated lockers inoperable. I could be way off base here as I’ve read nothing about that scenario but if it’s a real possibility, then for me, air lockers become a no go. Just my thoughts and a couple cents.
Living in the northeast, I've never had that issue with ARBs. The lockers require pressure at very low volume to operate. You're just pressurizing a 5mm OD/3mm ID length of hose. No more than a puff of air.
 
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Living in the northeast, I've never had that issue with ARBs. The lockers require pressure at very low volume to operate. You're just pressurizing a 5mm OD/3mm ID length of hose. No more than a puff of air.
I’m sure it’s an unlikely chance, but in my mind it wouldn’t take too much moisture to freeze in a 3mm ID tube. But realistically, there probably isn’t much relative humidity in sub freezing conditions anyway.
 

baldilocks

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I’m sure it’s an unlikely chance, but in my mind it wouldn’t take too much moisture to freeze in a 3mm ID tube. But realistically, there probably isn’t much relative humidity in sub freezing conditions anyway.
I’ve never had a problem with ice blocked air tubes after camping overnight in temps down into the teens. Most probably, any moister that may be in the air tubes is forced out into the atmosphere through the blow off valves when the lockers are disengaged.
 

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