Early FJ40 wiper motor restoration (1 Viewer)

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Most likely issue is old grease. I have never worked with these units before but I wouldn’t do anything I wasn’t comfortable attempting.
As for a pro shop, I’ll bet someone will know.
 

Green Bean

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Chris:
Your attention to detail and meticulous workmanship are stunning. If you get tired of wiper motor restoration, there is always a career as a Swiss watch maker.:)
 
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Very much appreciate the kind words!
I have a wiper motor off of a 77 that the brushes melted on. Is there a way to replace the brush holder and install new brushes?
78537202-B023-4627-9EF3-17225CC2E0B8.jpeg
 
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I have a wiper motor off of a 77 that the brushes melted on. Is there a way to replace the brush holder and install new brushes?View attachment 3073828
Yes you can replace the entire black plastic plate that the brush holders are on. It should be one unit. Should be able to unscrew it from the base. Looks like there are two screws holding it on. When you get the new one, you carefully pop off the retaining clips (lighter plastic bits on the end of the holder) and remove old brush. Save the springs if possible. Will have to de-solder the lead. New brush will have to be sanded to length if not exactly correct.
 
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Yes you can replace the entire black plastic plate that the brush holders are on. It should be one unit. Should be able to unscrew it from the base. Looks like there are two screws holding it on. When you get the new one, you carefully pop off the retaining clips (lighter plastic bits on the end of the holder) and remove old brush. Save the springs if possible. Will have to de-solder the lead. New brush will have to be sanded to length if not exactly correct.
Thanks, any leads on where to find that plate? Are they available new or are they a scavenge part?
 
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Bumping this thread. My wiper motor (getting wipers working) is coming up on the list. I noticed the first pic in the post had the horizontal piece that had a rubber sleeve on it. Mine was wrapped at some point in electrical tape. Where could I get that rubber sleeve?
 
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Bumping this thread. My wiper motor (getting wipers working) is coming up on the list. I noticed the first pic in the post had the horizontal piece that had a rubber sleeve on it. Mine was wrapped at some point in electrical tape. Where could I get that rubber sleeve?
I actually don’t know. You can get shrink wrap but I’m not sure how thick it is or how well it would match the original rubber.
 
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Update time!

Cleaning is relatively straightforward, so I won't lecture you too much on this. Some things to keep in mind:
1. Keep a lookout for any shims or nuts that may be stuck in old grease. Use paper towels to get as much gunk out as you can, then check what came out for metal.
2. I use an ultrasonic cleaner with Zep purple industrial degreaser. This is not necessary, but will make your life much easier. I have this one from Harbor Freight. It has been working for years for me, but your mileage may vary.
3. Qtips are very helpful.

Clean.jpg
 
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This may very well be one of the more “Zen” projects on a cruiser, a real rite of passage. New parts are rare, and it’s up to the owner to refurbish their own….!
 
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This may very well be one of the more “Zen” projects on a cruiser, a real rite of passage. New parts are rare, and it’s up to the owner to refurbish their own….!
VERY zen. It's not rocket science, but it requires patience and time. After a long day of thinking at work, I love zoning out and getting my hands dirty.
 

65swb45

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I think the very first article I submitted to the’new’ Toyota Trails circa 2005 was on this very subject. 😉
 
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I think the very first article I submitted to the’new’ Toyota Trails circa 2005 was on this very subject. 😉
There is a book called “Shop class as soulcraft” written by a philosopher/mechanic who left academia to open his own motorcycle repair shop. I found the prose to be unnecessarily flowery and arrogant at times, but the message was about valuing manual labor and craftsmanship. Pretty cool read.
 

65swb45

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Now comes the fun part!

Surface Prep and Body filler

Now that your parts are nice and clean, you will want to remove all rust and original paint that remains.
The best way to do this is probably a media blaster, but since I don't have a compressor powerful enough to run one yet I have to do it the old fashioned way: elbow grease, random orbital sanders, wire wheels, and a Dremel.

A few notes on this:
1. The metal used on these units is pretty soft. I would recommend brass wire wheels for this reason. Stainless steel brushes can be had, but unless your metal is super corroded I would use brass.
2. The main drive unit is pain in the butt to sand. Tiny brass wheels and a Dremel will help you get in the tiny crevices.
3. At some point, you will need to hand sand. I started with 120 grit and moved up to 220. A little trick is to wrap a flathead screwdriver in sandpaper to get into the small places
4. Be careful not to sand away small details! The rotor cover for instance has a TNK logo that is easily lost to aggressive sanding.
Covercrusty.jpg
Coversanded.jpg
Coverwired.jpg
 

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