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Bleeding brakes: MityVac or Motive?

Discussion in '80-Series Tech' started by LFD2037, Oct 10, 2017.

  1. LFD2037

    LFD2037 TEXAS LEXUS!

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    Since the MC reservoir is just a rubber cap that snals on, which of these work best for bleeding the brakes on an FZJ? Will the Motive b able to build pressure w/this style cap?
     
  2. Douglas S

    Douglas S

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    The motive universal sort of works on the 80...until it doesn't and pressurized brake fluids is ejected into your engine bay. Ask me how I know.

    The cap style on the 80 is not conducive to using a power bleeder effectively.
     
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  3. gbogh

    gbogh

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    I've used both with success.
    The motive is a lot faster once you get a good seal on the MC lid & can build pressure.
    The mityvac works pretty good too, you just have to check MC reservoir level more frequently because you only have the reservoir whereas with the motive, the pressure chamber can hold a lot of fluid. The mityvac seems like more of a multipurpose tool, cheaper, & more prevalent if I recall correctly.
    Hope that helps.
     
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  4. Douglas S

    Douglas S

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  5. ranma21

    ranma21 SILVER Star

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  6. Malleus

    Malleus

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    x5 on the Motive. Cheesy clamping design, but there's a better M/C adapter (by others).
     
  7. mingles

    mingles GOLD Star

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    :):):) goes to :bang::bang::bang: pretty quick when this happens.

    I like my Motive and have taken to using a carpenters clamp with one face on the top of the motive universal cap and the bottom face clamped against the bottom of the MC. Works fine using this method.

    Using the Motive just as a pressure generator rather than using it to continuously feed in new brake fluid also reduces the chance for spillage mishaps.
     
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  8. LFD2037

    LFD2037 TEXAS LEXUS!

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  9. Nooner

    Nooner

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  10. Malleus

    Malleus

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  11. JeepinPete

    JeepinPete

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    Motive works fine, just don't go above 10psi. It will move plenty of fluid and isn't a pain to seal. The attachment method is cheesy, I'll agree...
     
  12. Malleus

    Malleus

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    I pump mine (actually, @Izzyandsue's [yes, I do plan to bring it back] ) up to 15psi to get the fluid to move. I haven't done the calculations, but I think it'll be safe up to at least 20psi.
     
  13. Izzyandsue

    Izzyandsue Izzy SILVER Star

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    20 psi is max, I think the instructions say not to exceed. I have gone 22-24 on cars with stainless braided lines, more racing applications.

    Drop it off when you can, Patrick Niland was looking for it to do his 80 and I totally forgot where it was!
     
  14. Pin_Head

    Pin_Head

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    Just get your wife, children or friends to help push the pedal and do the 2 person bleeding method. If you don't have any family or friends, you could just pay a hooker. That way she could bleed both systems.
     
  15. Tools R Us

    Tools R Us

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    What do stainless braided lines have to do with it?:confused:
     
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  16. Tools R Us

    Tools R Us

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    Exactly, don't understand why there is so much trouble with it?:meh: Simple, quick and effective, takes less time than messing with the bleeder.
     
  17. LFD2037

    LFD2037 TEXAS LEXUS!

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    W/ABS & LSVP, these rigs are a PITA to bleed. That's no secret. BUT I'll be getting rid of both of those Friday, hence why I'm looking @ bleeding options. I've bled a ton of brakes that had neither, & I agree it's not difficult @ all. Maybe I'll wait & see how it goes Friday after I remove ABS & LSVP before I buy a bleeder.
     
  18. Izzyandsue

    Izzyandsue Izzy SILVER Star

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    I have the motive for over 15 years now when I was young and was racing. And the one I have now is my 3rd unit. It’s not a bleeder as much as a flusher. Common practice in racing weekends to flush the fluid once, pedal would get squishy as many tracks have 14+ turns on 2, 2.5miles. Lots of braking, and many races are won by latest and hardest car on the brakes. Using ate blue to ate yellow let’s you ensure a full flush, you can visibly see the blue fluid turns to green then yellow, and vice versa. Lift the car up, remove wheels, flush the fluid and you are back on track the next day for another 150 miles or whatever you do, the high pressure flush would be quick and ensure no bubbles left, and you can do it on your own.

    SS braids are for 2 reasons, heat resistance and shield for crap from the car in front of you will hit your lines. You have air scoops collecting and directing air to the brakes, and they pick up all kinds of debris too and fling it at your hoses. Think coarse sand blasting. SS braids protect them. So the rubber lines (front brakes is the most common use and what I ran) get a beating and are subjected to beet red rotors, which is why the race shops sell the braided lines. That exposure erodes the rubber, leading to leaks and failures at 130 mph on the front stretch of VIR (been there, seen that, survived). On the rear brakes you typically use high temp rubber racing hoses, but not SS braids, that’s just bling.

    I don’t use any of that on my 80. Just the tool to flush brakes. Makes sense?
     
  19. Tools R Us

    Tools R Us

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    Don't see the need for bleeding procedure/pressure difference?
     
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