Builds 1977 Freeborn Red FJ40 Patina Build (4 Viewers)

Will Van

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A couple of weeks ago I decided to take the FJ40 for a spin to run some Friday afternoon errands. While on the highway I noticed the smell of raw fuel. It got considerably worse, so I decided to pop the hood and inspect the fuel lines once I got to my destination. I got extremely lucky that I did not catch the truck on fire. The fancy Marshall mechanical fuel pressure gauge had failed while driving, and was dumping fuel all over the engine bay, including on the headers.

I decided to just abandon the stainless steel hardlines and gauge, and run a full Fragola Push-Lok setup. It's not nearly as cool looking, but it doesn't leak. You can see the glycerine that dripped on the header and burned in place. Again, I am extremely lucky I didn't burn the truck down.
035-F6-CCA-9-FFA-4-DE8-BCFC-9-E5-B8-A758-A51.jpg
 

Will Van

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I am also having trouble with my valve cover gasket leaking. When I installed it the first time, I installed it dry. It leaked like a sieve. When I modified all the fuel lines, I used the opportunity to replace the valve cover with a fresh gasket. This time I used GasgaCinch to prep all mating surfaces and the gasket itself. The leak is much better, but it's still leaking at the front driver's side corner.

Does anyone have any suggestions or tips to get the valve cover gasket to quit leaking? In both installations I prepped the valve cover and head extremely well. Everything was clean and dry before install. Although Toyota service manual says to install dry, I'm thinking about pulling the valve cover one more time and prepping the gasket with Toyota FIPG, then reinstalling and letting it cure. What do you guys think?
7-C6-C94-C0-49-D3-4-E43-844-E-ED0-A2-A29-A3-CF.jpg
 

Honger

Joel, TLCA #21509
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I am also having trouble with my valve cover gasket leaking. When I installed it the first time, I installed it dry. It leaked like a sieve. When I modified all the fuel lines, I used the opportunity to replace the valve cover with a fresh gasket. This time I used GasgaCinch to prep all mating surfaces and the gasket itself. The leak is much better, but it's still leaking at the front driver's side corner.

Does anyone have any suggestions or tips to get the valve cover gasket to quit leaking? In both installations I prepped the valve cover and head extremely well. Everything was clean and dry before install. Although Toyota service manual says to install dry, I'm thinking about pulling the valve cover one more time and prepping the gasket with Toyota FIPG, then reinstalling and letting it cure. What do you guys think?
7-C6-C94-C0-49-D3-4-E43-844-E-ED0-A2-A29-A3-CF.jpg
I'd be hesitant to use FIPG... valve cover is meant to be removed for adjustments from time to time. You sure the red powder coat isn't contact somewhere and creating a point for flow to get through?

Love your engine bay. Glad that fuel spill didn't end up serious.
 

Will Van

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I'd be hesitant to use FIPG... valve cover is meant to be removed for adjustments from time to time. You sure the red powder coat isn't contact somewhere and creating a point for flow to get through?

Love your engine bay. Glad that fuel spill didn't end up serious.

Thanks for the feedback. I don't think there is any misapplied powdercoat. I double-checked the interior of the valve cover when I installed the gasket the second time. For sure there was none in the valley where the gasket rides. There may be some at the very edge, but it does seem odd that it won't seal.
 

Will Van

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Also, I've decided to go a different direction with my Patina build. I have come to the realization that the 40-series will never be a long-distance cruiser (or is it "Cruiser"?). And I want to keep the truck relatively stock.

Someone else should take advantage of the diesel parts I have gathered. I have both a 1HZ kit and a 12HT kit.
FCC3-A1-EF-B2-EB-489-E-82-D2-F62-C1559-B51-A.jpg

3-E2-A1-D1-E-A5-B8-418-D-A195-D4-B49-D6-BB645.jpg


Check out my classifieds ads here for the 1HZ kit and here for the 12HT kit.
 

Will Van

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Could it be bent/warped? Does it sit flush on a tabletop?

Possibly, but that seems unlikely. I'll check it next time I pull the valve cover. I also thought the silver paint the PO applied on the head might be interfering.
 
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Possibly, but that seems unlikely. I'll check it next time I pull the valve cover. I also thought the silver paint the PO applied on the head might be interfering.

My valve cover on my 2FE is also powder coating... and leaks. I wonder if the oven temps might cause some warpage. Hmmmmm
 

Will Van

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My valve cover on my 2FE is also powder coating... and leaks. I wonder if the oven temps might cause some warpage. Hmmmmm

I think I still have my original valve cover. I bought an extra core because I wanted the "2F" branding and a threaded oil cap. I suppose I could swap back. The powder-coated valve cover looks real pretty, but who gives a sh*t if it leaks.
 
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I think I still have my original valve cover. I bought an extra core because I wanted the "2F" branding and a threaded oil cap. I suppose I could swap back. The powder-coated valve cover looks real pretty, but who gives a sh*t if it leaks.

Exaaaactly. But hey, maybe I'm way off. I think powder ovens are like what, 400*F? It's certainly a possibility given how long they are.
 
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My valve cover on my 2FE is also powder coating... and leaks. I wonder if the oven temps might cause some warpage. Hmmmmm

My vote is that it's a little bit warped, most likely from over tightening as it has probably been off and back on quite a few times over the life of the engine.

My experience is mostly with American V8s from this era, but it was pretty common to take a hammer and beat the flange back into shape each time I replaced a valve cover gasket because they tend to flex up over time. Obviously using a nice flat surface as a guide.
 
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Honger

Joel, TLCA #21509
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I think I still have my original valve cover. I bought an extra core because I wanted the "2F" branding and a threaded oil cap. I suppose I could swap back. The powder-coated valve cover looks real pretty, but who gives a sh*t if it leaks.
I do have to admit it looks really pretty... envy-inspiring actually. But yeah... leaks suck.
 

FJBen

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Possibly that the cover is a bit warped. You could take it to a machine shop and have them square it up I suppose.

I hate leaks as well. It's kind of funny, not digging on you, but sometimes how the fancier setups for fueling/hoses/connectors actually are more troublesome that straight ol fuel hose and a hose clamp.

I think you are going the right way with this cruiser. making an FJ40 a long haul cruiser is tough unless you REALLY love that 40 experience.
 

Will Van

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Possibly that the cover is a bit warped. You could take it to a machine shop and have them square it up I suppose.

I hate leaks as well. It's kind of funny, not digging on you, but sometimes how the fancier setups for fueling/hoses/connectors actually are more troublesome that straight ol fuel hose and a hose clamp.

I think you are going the right way with this cruiser. making an FJ40 a long haul cruiser is tough unless you REALLY love that 40 experience.

Agreed. But some lessons you have to learn the hard way.

Toyota diesel 4x4 is in the future, I'm just not sure what combination/setup exactly.

I may pull the valve cover and see if it's warped. I'm not sure what I will do if it is.
 

FJBen

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Agreed. But some lessons you have to learn the hard way.

Toyota diesel 4x4 is in the future, I'm just not sure what combination/setup exactly.

I may pull the valve cover and see if it's warped. I'm not sure what I will do if it is.


Agreed,

I'm gonna say if you want Toyota and diesel and long haul look no further than a 70 series. No weird swap issues and pretty decent road manners, WAY better than a 40 for that. 70/71 series gets you soft, metal top size of a 40, 73/74 gets you more room than a 40, soft or removable hard top, 75 get you pickup or troopy, with pickup having a removable top as well.
 

Will Van

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I'm still having fuel leak issues. As most of you know, I installed an Aeromotive Phantom in-tank fuel pump assembly and bulkhead when plumbing my Holley Sniper (Post #49). It appears to be leaking.

I have an off-road trail on some personal property west of Austin. It is extremely steep with loose rock and limestone. In some areas it has significant shelves with grades well-over 30 degrees. Because the Cruiser is geared so low, and has ARB front and rear lockers, climbing the trail is not a problem. It will just idle up.

However, every time I climb the trail, I get a significant raw fuel smell from the truck. Not good. I finally figured out where it was coming from yesterday when inspecting under the passengers seat with a flashlight after running the trail. You could see moisture from the fuel on top of the bulkhead. With a full tank of fuel, and climbing at a steep angle, the gasoline is essentially resting on the backside of the Aeromotive bulkhead. The foam seal on the bulkhead is fine. There was no moisture at the tank/seal itself. And the push-lok AN fittings do not leak. But the bulkhead has 10 threaded bolts with nuts and nylon washers that hold the bulkhead in place on top of the fuel tank. Apparently these leak when fuel is resting on them. They were covered in fuel.

I pulled the passengers seat this morning and I am debating climbing the trail one more time to confirm that is exactly where the fuel is coming from.

4-B88-E566-A2-AB-4-E63-9-F8-B-DC908-BF30-A61.jpg


23673777-1-C01-4-EE8-949-A-5-CF016-ABA0-A5.jpg



Regardless, I'm going to need to modify my fuel pump setup. I am debating: (a) running a Holley In-Tank Retrofit Fuel Module (does not utilize the 10 individual bolts to clamp to the tank); or (b) running an external fuel pump.

The advantage of the Holley setup is that it would be essentially plug-and-play with my current fuel line routing and fuel pump wiring. It will even simplify the setup a little because the bulkhead has an internal regulator and is a return-less system. So I could delete my LS-style filter/regulator, which has kinda cheesy mounting anyway. And it also comes with a Hydramat fuel pickup which would be great for fuel starvation at steep angles/grades.

Here are a few photos of the Holley Retrofit. You can see in the second photo how the bulkhead clamping system rotates inside the fuel tank so you do not have to drill holes for threaded nuts/bolts (like the Aeromotive design).

Returnless-Holley.jpg


Holley-Retrofit.jpg


The alternative is to run an external fuel pump. This would require a complete redesign of the fuel system, including regulator, fuel filter, the pump itself, and all of the lines/fittings. It is arguably safer, because the pump would be mounted outside of the cab and high pressure fuel would be under the vehicle or in the engine bay (instead of inside the cab). But I also have no experience with external pumps and have heard they can be noisy and unreliable.

What do you guys think? Run the trail again and confirm the leaks are coming from the 10 Aeromotive bolts/nylon washers?
 
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Joined
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I'm still having fuel leak issues. As most of you know, I installed an Aeromotive Phantom in-tank fuel pump assembly and bulkhead when plumbing my Holley Sniper (Post #49). It appears to be leaking.

I have an off-road trail on some personal property west of Austin. It is extremely steep with loose rock and limestone. In some areas it has significant shelves with grades well-over 30 degrees. Because the Cruiser is geared so low, and has ARB front and rear lockers, climbing the trail is not a problem. It will just idle up.

However, every time I climb the trail, I get a significant raw fuel smell from the truck. Not good. I finally figured out where it was coming from yesterday when inspecting under the passengers seat with a flashlight after running the trail. You could see moisture from the fuel on top of the bulkhead. With a full tank of fuel, and climbing at a steep angle, the gasoline is essentially resting on the backside of the Aeromotive bulkhead. The foam seal on the bulkhead is fine. There was no moisture at the tank/seal itself. And the push-lok AN fittings do not leak. But the bulkhead has 10 threaded bolts with nuts and nylon washers that hold the bulkhead in place on top of the fuel tank. Apparently these leak when fuel is resting on them. They were covered in fuel.

I pulled the passengers seat this morning and I am debating climbing the trail one more time to confirm that is exactly where the fuel is coming from.

4-B88-E566-A2-AB-4-E63-9-F8-B-DC908-BF30-A61.jpg


23673777-1-C01-4-EE8-949-A-5-CF016-ABA0-A5.jpg



Regardless, I'm going to need to modify my fuel pump setup. I am debating: (a) running a Holley In-Tank Retrofit Fuel Module (does not utilize the 10 individual bolts to clamp to the tank); or (b) running an external fuel pump.

The advantage of the Holley setup is that it would be essentially plug-and-play with my current fuel line routing and fuel pump wiring. It will even simplify the setup a little because the bulkhead has an internal regulator and is a return-less system. So I could delete my LS-style filter/regulator, which has kinda cheesy mounting anyway.

Here are a few photos of the Holley Retrofit. You can see in the second photo how the bulkhead clamping system rotates inside the fuel tank so you do not have to drill holes for threaded nuts/bolts (like the Aeromotive design).

Returnless-Holley.jpg


Holley-Retrofit.jpg


The alternative is to run an external fuel pump. This would require a complete redesign of the fuel system, including regulator, fuel filter, the pump itself, and all of the lines/fittings. It is arguably safer, because the pump would be mounted outside of the cab and high pressure fuel would be under the vehicle or in the engine bay (instead of inside the cab). But I also have no experience with external pumps and have heard they can be noisy and unreliable.

What do you guys think? Run the trail again and confirm the leaks are coming from the 10 Aeromotive bolts/nylon washers?

I'm currently running a inexpensive Bosch external pump, with longer term plans to go to an in tank pump like above. I've yet to get a pre-pump filter setup to work. Lots of cavitation and noise. Since they are ~$75 I decided to see how long the pump lasts with hopes it won't crap out before I'm able to get the in-tank setup. It's just a lot of work with my rollcage having to come out (I'm being lazy). I run through an Automotive adjustable FPR off the fuel rail, dumps the excess to the stock return on the tank. I prefer that since it's easier on the pump and keeps the fuel cooler, well at least that's the theory. Hope you find an easy enough solution, but I'd vote towards trying some thread sealer on the current pump first and see if that does the trick.
 

samc2447

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Run it again to find the leak before you throw parts at it.

In tank is better for pump life because the fuel keeps it cool. I've had both, and wouldn't run external again - but I do keep one for a trail spare.

If you want the fuel smell gone for good, ditch the in cab fuel tank and go with a rear fuel cell. You'll also get more fuel capacity.
 

Will Van

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Run it again to find the leak before you throw parts at it.

In tank is better for pump life because the fuel keeps it cool. I've had both, and wouldn't run external again - but I do keep one for a trail spare.

If you want the fuel smell gone for good, ditch the in cab fuel tank and go with a rear fuel cell. You'll also get more fuel capacity.


Agreed 100%. Thanks for the help. I'll try another shakedown run soon.
 

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