To Lipstick And Beyond

Content may include affiliate links. Please see terms for details.

Joined
Jul 19, 2006
Messages
585
Location
MS Gulf Coast
The fuel pressure inlet on my carb faces the head where the return line fitting resides on later carbs. It does not appear that the carb can easily be modified to accept a return fitting. Perhaps changing the air horn. At this point, that seems like a solution looking for a problem.

While researching, found this quote in another thread from Mark's Off Road, "Pre-73 carbs had no return, and they all do just fine without one." That's good enough for me.

I'm going to drive it with the line plugged at the tank until I discover a reason to add a return line.

It's crazy the crap one uncovers around every corner. I wouldn't have found this problem until all the previous work was completed to get it on the road and find this.

My job continues: lift rocks and see what crawls out.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jul 19, 2006
Messages
585
Location
MS Gulf Coast
Today I lifted the cheap glued-down carpet and the photos show the floor after a putty scraper and vacuum. Next, I'll take a media blaster to it. The photos show some rot in the seam where the front/rear floor begins to roll up for the rear seat. The holes are clear on both sides but the buckle in the seam tells me it throughout.

What is the way to fix that seam. I'm thinking cut off the top layer of the seam below where the vertical angle turns horizontal (its width), then lay in new floor patch running a little proud from front to back under where the top piece was, then place new top piece to replicate the seam. Alternatively, the holes are all in the floor before it got seamed over. So does one cut flush with the top seam, grind flat from underneath, then go under with new floor patch. That would leave most diificult piece to replicate in place. But how does one reattach the floor patch to this piece. Ideas please. Thank you.
IMG_4922.JPG
IMG_4923.JPG
IMG_4924.JPG
 
Last edited:

bobm

WTF, WTF, WTF!!!!
Joined
Oct 20, 2010
Messages
8,727
Location
Land of the Free/Home of the Brave
Theres no exact way to do it. What happens is because the flange is spotwelded on top of the floor pan, water from your boots and snow get trapped underneath! 2 ways to do it! Eliminate the flange and butt the pieces together, or apply a seam sealer inside and out. Remember it took 40+ years to get this way πŸ˜‰πŸ·
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2006
Messages
585
Location
MS Gulf Coast
Bob,

I appreciate that. I think the way it would be easier for me to achieve a good result is to use the flange as a guide and cut off the floor just outside and keeping the flange. Then clean the underside. What if I drilled holes in the flange before the floor patch went on underlapping. Then I could "spot weld" through the flange. Does that sound like a good repair?
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jul 19, 2006
Messages
585
Location
MS Gulf Coast
Safety question:

I need to patch the above floor panels. I've taught myself to weld and have practiced joining sheet metal several ways. What I don't know are the safety issues when using cut off, grinder, or welder on the vehicle with gasoline in the fuel tank.

Does the risk of generating sparks while doing any of the above require removing the gas tank from the vehicle prior to welding? Is that the 100% of the time answer or are there safe mitigations. I'm not looking to cut corners at all-just don't have any appreciation for what defines the standard.

Thank you.
 

bobm

WTF, WTF, WTF!!!!
Joined
Oct 20, 2010
Messages
8,727
Location
Land of the Free/Home of the Brave
Where are you welding?? If you're doing front or rear pans you should be fine!! Just look underneath for fuel and brake lines! If you're concerned about anything, put a piece of scrap between where you are welding,grinding or cutting πŸ€”πŸ˜‰. It will deflect the sparks πŸ˜πŸ€”πŸ˜‰πŸ”₯
 
Joined
Oct 12, 2015
Messages
2,229
Location
Langley
Where are you welding?? If you're doing front or rear pans you should be fine!! Just look underneath for fuel and brake lines! If you're concerned about anything, put a piece of scrap between where you are welding,grinding or cutting πŸ€”πŸ˜‰. It will deflect the sparks πŸ˜πŸ€”πŸ˜‰πŸ”₯
When I was a young shyt disturber I managed to put a self tapping screw through a fuel line....mounting a fire extinguisher bracket :slap:

Always look under where your working....Murphy doesn’t rest.
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2006
Messages
585
Location
MS Gulf Coast
The repair area is at back of passenger foot area where the front of the cargo area wall descends and joins at the floor under the rear seat. There is a fuel line under the vehicle on the passenger side perpendicular to the above referenced joint.

I could easily remove the source of fuel for that line by plugging at the tank, then blow line clear. Would that be sufficient?
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2006
Messages
585
Location
MS Gulf Coast
Not the best photos, but above in post #82. Thank you for your help. Repeated below.

IMG_4922.JPG
 
Joined
Nov 23, 2012
Messages
2,283
Location
San Diego
You can't overthink safety. That being said, I think you are good to go. If the line is metal I wouldn't sweat it. If it is rubber maybe deflect. Just ALWAYS have an extinguisher near when welding or doing a cut/grind.
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2006
Messages
585
Location
MS Gulf Coast
I need help to get me moving forward again. I can weld new metal but don't have any experience joining old to new so I'm stuck between what I see as two choices. The enclosed photo (and others above) show the rot at the edge of the passenger floor seam just as it rises up and backwards under the rear seat. That rot is on both sides.

I'm going to keep the flange at the rear (shown in the left side of photo) and go over (or under) it with new metal. I'm stuck with two general planning issues. What I'm stuck on is whether or not to run one large floor panel or weld in several small patches keeping and going around the stiffener ribs. If I put in one large panel, it would probably run forward to about the "6" on the tape measure. I would have to add ribs back in. Is that cleaner or easier than cutting a goofy abstract piece going around and keeping the existing ribs?

Another area where I have no practical knowledge. Whether I "go large or small", I'm worried about the weld seam if I were to butt the panels especially if I'm going to make small patches and weld more to the rear where one can see the metal, although not rotted through, is certainly "pock-marked". It seems that due to the condition of the old metal it would be a difficult butt weld to make without burning through, correct. The metal is cleaner farther forward if I were to make a large floor patch. Is that an easier weld to make correctly as the metal is cleaner there? Or does lapping the forward joint wherever it goes eliminate my concerns?

IMG_4933.JPG
 
Last edited:

bobm

WTF, WTF, WTF!!!!
Joined
Oct 20, 2010
Messages
8,727
Location
Land of the Free/Home of the Brave
Do you have a full rear floorpan?? Most important thing welding old to new is that the metal is clean!! If you are concerned about burn through, use a piece of brass or copper on the back of the joint to prevent that. Start with a low setting on welder and tack pieces of scrap together of same thickness and adjust from there. I would use the whole floor pan if thats what you have. You'll go nuts piecing all that πŸ’© together. Capice πŸ€”πŸ˜‰
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2006
Messages
585
Location
MS Gulf Coast
Thank you for your help. I don't have a floor pan-I assume they don't exist. I was going to cut one to whatever size needed for the job. If you note the "6" or "7" on the tape measure, there is a sheet metal support underneath right at that point joining two floor panels there. My metal is good there.

For the front edge of my new panel, I was going to cut right along the rear edge of that support leaving the support and good floor completely over the support. Then, I was going to cut and fit a custom panel to go full width from the rear flange forward overlapping the good floor over that support and existing floor. I would add back any needed stiffness and seat belt anchors.

Does that sound OK? Is that better than piecing? I appreciate your thoughts. Thank you.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jul 19, 2006
Messages
585
Location
MS Gulf Coast
Thank you. Ringing @remy1974. I PMed w/o response. Assumed dead-end. I'd love to see what a floorpan looks like. That would probably "point" the way forward.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top Bottom