Sound Deadening a 60 for a quieter ride (1 Viewer)

Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
8,961
Location
Ladysmith
I did the rear side panels cause I had them off. But I won't have time to get to the doors. The rear has
a plywood custom cover, so not going to mess with that. It is designed to seal all the way around when closed.
 
Joined
Feb 1, 2013
Messages
98
Previous owner of one of my 60s did the entire inside with some heavy tarred metal stuff. Like dynamat. Inside the doors, all the floors, etc. Yes that truck is quieter than my other non-dampened truck, but it isn't significantly quieter. 65mph on the freeway is still pretty noisy because of wind and tires and the engine. I rented a Yukon once and I'd call it quiet. When I drive long distances I wear earmuffs with 30+ db sound reduction. They make a huge difference to my comfort on long drives.
 
Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
8,961
Location
Ladysmith
Well, finally got out for test drive. 84 dB, which all things being equal is pretty quiet.
Fact: Absolutely no quietening effect on the gear noise. I’m actually seriously considering removing the low range gears.
But- the truck has not one rattle or bang and is really quiet on secondary low speed driving. Super quiet, big difference.
So overall I’m happy. More final updates after steaks get done on the barby
 
Joined
Oct 29, 2008
Messages
46
Nice work cruiserpilot! lovin the trail photo in your first post. Is that factory color (nice either way)? How far up into the Yukon have you been able to get in your 60?
 
Joined
Aug 9, 2007
Messages
693
Location
Tucson, AZ
Previous owner of one of my 60s did the entire inside with some heavy tarred metal stuff. Like dynamat. Inside the doors, all the floors, etc. Yes that truck is quieter than my other non-dampened truck, but it isn't significantly quieter. 65mph on the freeway is still pretty noisy because of wind and tires and the engine. I rented a Yukon once and I'd call it quiet. When I drive long distances I wear earmuffs with 30+ db sound reduction. They make a huge difference to my comfort on long drives.

From the For Whatever it's Worth catagory I humbly submit...

@cruiserpilot and others...I drive a 62 with the AT, so my transmission noise situation may be different from you guys in the 60, but I see a lot of guys jumping into the sound deadening/thermal barrier tasks. My final career (post military aviation and movie industry) had a strong acoustics component. I had to really get in the books and get training...and lot of experience to have good understanding. Sound transmission is the factor of acoustics at play in this subject with our vehicles. In the professional acoustics world there are Sound Transmission Coefficient (STC) specifications for rooms in buildings. Movie theaters are a good example. For a theater to get a THX certification, the auditorium has to meet a given STC per frequency so that the movie sound in the next auditorium can't invade.

Sound transmission absorption is frequency specific. By that I mean that a given absorption product will only absorb a limited range of frequencies and that is when it is transmitting via air waves. When it is attached to something solid, many frequencies can travel through the structure and emanate from places you would not expect. A perfect example that we may experience in a home is if you have a powerful subwoofer that is sitting on a concreted slab floor. You can fill all your walls with anything thing and any amount you want, but the sound is gonna travel through the slab and be heard everywhere. This principle explains what @zakthor experiences.

Theaters and such rooms overcome this by not only absorption products but structural isolation ("floating" walls, floors, and ceilings). Structural isolation is not feasible in our vehicles. Absorption products must be dense and thick to have broadband absorption (a wide range of frequencies). That's not feasible either.

Of course few of us have close to OEM vehicles, but in a 62 with OEM exhaust, the biggest noise maker in our vehicle cabin is going to be tire/road noise. It not only can be so loud that it travels in the air around the vehicle, but is definitely transmitting through the vehicle structure. If you run aggressive off-road tread that is not designed with noise-cancelling tread technology (or they have worn poorly), that noise is going to make it into the cabin easily. Can we absorb enough of the noise that is bugging us with just absorption product? Personally, I don't think significantly beyond the OEM absorption liner. Of course, if your OEM liner is a gonner, you need to replace it with something that is appropriately effective.

The only other alternative is to find a happy medium in tire selection. How much mudding do you do verses hardball driving? How much do you need noisy mudders verses AT tires with good noise-cancelling tread design? I've always run AT tires and they used to be noisy, too. Only in recent years has computer modelling permitted effective noise cancelling tread design. I now run modern AT tires that are nicely quiet, look great, and will get me through anything I'm going to encounter in my semi-rural and occasional off-road driving.

By the way, very wise on the ear protection! Long term exposure to those spl numbrers in the 80s is murder on hearing damage.

Cheers.
 
Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
8,961
Location
Ladysmith
From the For Whatever it's Worth catagory I humbly submit...

@cruiserpilot and others...I drive a 62 with the AT, so my transmission noise situation may be different from you guys in the 60, but I see a lot of guys jumping into the sound deadening/thermal barrier tasks. My final career (post military aviation and movie industry) had a strong acoustics component. I had to really get in the books and get training...and lot of experience to have good understanding. Sound transmission is the factor of acoustics at play in this subject with our vehicles. In the professional acoustics world there are Sound Transmission Coefficient (STC) specifications for rooms in buildings. Movie theaters are a good example. For a theater to get a THX certification, the auditorium has to meet a given STC per frequency so that the movie sound in the next auditorium can't invade.

Sound transmission absorption is frequency specific. By that I mean that a given absorption product will only absorb a limited range of frequencies and that is when it is transmitting via air waves. When it is attached to something solid, many frequencies can travel through the structure and emanate from places you would not expect. A perfect example that we may experience in a home is if you have a powerful subwoofer that is sitting on a concreted slab floor. You can fill all your walls with anything thing and any amount you want, but the sound is gonna travel through the slab and be heard everywhere. This principle explains what @zakthor experiences.

Theaters and such rooms overcome this by not only absorption products but structural isolation ("floating" walls, floors, and ceilings). Structural isolation is not feasible in our vehicles. Absorption products must be dense and thick to have broadband absorption (a wide range of frequencies). That's not feasible either.

Of course few of us have close to OEM vehicles, but in a 62 with OEM exhaust, the biggest noise maker in our vehicle cabin is going to be tire/road noise. It not only can be so loud that it travels in the air around the vehicle, but is definitely transmitting through the vehicle structure. If you run aggressive off-road tread that is not designed with noise-cancelling tread technology (or they have worn poorly), that noise is going to make it into the cabin easily. Can we absorb enough of the noise that is bugging us with just absorption product? Personally, I don't think significantly beyond the OEM absorption liner. Of course, if your OEM liner is a gonner, you need to replace it with something that is appropriately effective.

The only other alternative is to find a happy medium in tire selection. How much mudding do you do verses hardball driving? How much do you need noisy mudders verses AT tires with good noise-cancelling tread design? I've always run AT tires and they used to be noisy, too. Only in recent years has computer modelling permitted effective noise cancelling tread design. I now run modern AT tires that are nicely quiet, look great, and will get me through anything I'm going to encounter in my semi-rural and occasional off-road driving.

By the way, very wise on the ear protection! Long term exposure to those spl numbrers in the 80s is murder on hearing damage.

Cheers.


Thanks for the information. Pretty much as I researched, and in the end found out. I did a lot of research, got into more than a few articles and blogs on the subject. Fascinating subject when I got into it. I had to try, since its really the gear noise, although for some reason I hear the tires more than before. I run Toyo MT's, but I didn't get them for the quiet ride.
Weird part, my BJ74 with no carpet, all steel inside runs at 74 dB consistently. It is by far less noisy, don't understand that.
Anyhow, I'll put up final photos with new carpet and seats soon,
 
Joined
Aug 9, 2007
Messages
693
Location
Tucson, AZ
Thanks for the information. Pretty much as I researched, and in the end found out. I did a lot of research, got into more than a few articles and blogs on the subject. Fascinating subject when I got into it. I had to try, since its really the gear noise, although for some reason I hear the tires more than before. I run Toyo MT's, but I didn't get them for the quiet ride.
Weird part, my BJ74 with no carpet, all steel inside runs at 74 dB consistently. It is by far less noisy, don't understand that.
Anyhow, I'll put up final photos with new carpet and seats soon,

My pleasure. The Toyos' noise was there. Your work has absorbed enough of the gear noise at that frequency, but not that of the tires. With the gear noise down, the Toyos become the stand-out. Bummer.
 

brownbear

Mod in Hibernation
Moderator
Joined
Sep 6, 2004
Messages
7,146
Location
North West Ontario
How about putting some deadener right onto top of the transmission? It doesn't have to seal, just disrupt he sound waves.

I did my doors years ago with 1/8 inch thick rubber type, sort of what you did your top coat in. They vastly made the doors less rattlely and made them sound better closing them.

My cruiser is noisy too.
 
Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
8,961
Location
Ladysmith
If you look at what I did, I’ve actually covered everything almost to the point of being sealed again with 1lb mass loaded vinyl. From the firewall -10” up- to the front edge of the rear cargo area has three layers of sound deadening, as well as the bolt on transmission cover. I even layered it in under the shifter boots.
 
Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
8,961
Location
Ladysmith
Here are pics of the transmission cover, butyl and closed cell foam layers under the MLV. I even added it to the back of the kick panels, every little bit helps.

FB63BB4E-17C2-472F-BC3F-1B6E13B44992.jpeg
7A62F3F7-F41D-4F5F-A9BB-1C84E09A86BE.jpeg
02716D66-A4DF-40DE-9EEF-024FBC70742B.jpeg
 
Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
8,961
Location
Ladysmith
Spoiler to the purists! At the touch of a button, I went with green instead of factory brown. I’ve always liked colours and my truck is painted Ford Black Jade, which is the coolest colour ever. I had my trepidation but was unfounded. I REALLY like this colour. The fit was tough, because my sound deadening is extreme, I had issues with the felting that is glued to the bottom of the carpet. I had to just cut the tops of all carpet where there was bracket attachments. In the end, good fit and quality of the carpet is good.

FEB8B088-C521-46F1-A461-5BE438A9826F.jpeg
0A53A53F-9DF9-47FD-8426-AEC3B2C14EBB.jpeg
C6E43135-7A67-4D51-8F95-E3E7C73C324C.jpeg
4E94D01C-352A-44A2-8E98-44E902C70A32.jpeg
2DB71BDB-DF73-45FA-833F-DB835A7B27EF.jpeg
 
Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
8,961
Location
Ladysmith
The rear cargo area is just going to get the Noico 175 ml closed cell foam insulation. The carpet comes with really thick felting. I also am finally able to turn the Spectre Off Road diamond pattern vinyl over and use it under the felting as extra layer of sound absorption and floor protection, but the carpet makes it so much nicer to kneel and have a better place for the Ridgebacks to lay down now. They wouldn’t lay on the diamond pattern vinyl, it was really ugly uncomfortable
 
Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
8,961
Location
Ladysmith
Here is the carpet I got.
I’ve seen their boxes in several different repair and restoration shops in the last few months.
Factory quality and fit. Good stuff.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top Bottom