Repair leak in gas tank

77HesterSue

SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 20, 2008
Messages
1,217
Location
Des Moines, IA
Along the front seam close to the passenger side the tank has a very minor gas leak. I'm looking for advice on whether to drain, pull tank and take to a radiator shop for repair. Or if I can take a less involved path of using JB Weld Tankweld to seal the seam? Thoughts please. This is on a 1961 FJ40. No rust on the gas tank, just the leaking at the seal. Thanks
TankWeld - https://www.jbweld.com/product/tankweld
 
Joined
Oct 7, 2011
Messages
1,099
Location
Austin TX
I have brazed, TIG'd and soldered lots of gas tanks and some stainless water heaters. Leaks at seams are the hardest to get a seal on. Often you end up chasing the leak down the length of the seam.
 

fjwagon

SILVER Star
Joined
Dec 7, 2004
Messages
1,955
When I lived in Jacksonville, I remember having a gas leak and didn't know where to take it. I ended up taking it to a radiator shop and this old man said he could repair it for 35 bucks. I thought that was a really good deal. Anyhow, He filled the gas tank with water and kept the water running as he did his magic with the acetylene torch. I think he used a piece scrap tin he had lying around or it seemed that way. Like he was gluing something together, he made it look so easy. It was obviously not his first rodeo. I thought it was pretty cool watching make a repair with no effort.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Apr 2, 2008
Messages
11,381
Location
Victoria, BC
I’ve used ‘Seal All’ many times. It’ll hold till the metal around it rots away.
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2008
Messages
11,381
Location
Victoria, BC
Seal-All for the win! It cured my tank neck leak... it was soldered previously.

A friend’s 1970 Chevelle fuel pump split open in the Rockies 300 miles from home on a Sunday afternoon. The only place he could find open was a hardware store that sold ‘Seal All’. He bought a few tubes.

He then removed the pump from the engine and squished the pump back together. Over the next hour or so he put layer after layer of Seal All over the pump around the seam. Once he had a thick enough coat of Seal All covering the split open pump the threw it back on the car.

He proceeded to drive the 300 miles home to Radium Hot Springs. After work on Monday he picked up a new pump and threw it into the trunk. He kept driving the car with the glued together pump for a week or so till he decided to replace it. Although it was still working 100%, he didn’t want to push his luck too far.

In ‘92 I sealed up a seam leak on my 40 tank. About 20 years later the bottom of the tank was too far gone to save… the seam still never leaked.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top Bottom