Brake Rotor Issues

Joined
May 23, 2017
Messages
7
Location
USA
I have a 2016 Land Cruiser that experienced brake pulsing not felt through the pedal.

While driving it on the interstate brakes are used to maintain intervals with traffic. This is when the whole vehicle would vibrate under a light load on the pedal. It was noticeable in the seat of the pants but also in the steering wheel. It was also became apparent at slow speed stops where the brakes seemed to pulse/grab/jog.

A friend and independent shop owner took it for a test ride and used some colorful language to describe what he was feeling. I could feel it from the passenger seat as well.
The next step was to get the dealer involved. The shop foreman took it out and immediately noted a problem. We talked about it on the way back to the dealer and made an appointment for rear rotors.

Last week the rear rotors were replaced. While the technician was checking the car over he found the fronts had some run-out as well. These were ordered and installed yesterday.
The car seems better at slower speed stops and for now doesn't exhibit "jog-pulsing". I can actually perform a linear stop without the brakes grabbing although I think the brakes on these have too much assist.

The test will be at speed under light braking. If that's solved I'm good to go!
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
449
Location
Parker, CO
My '13 has done the "jog-pulsing" you describe since I got it last summer with 49k on it. It continues to do it even with new pads+rotors and even one new front caliper. Not thrilled about it, and Toyota was very reluctant to do anything even about the caliper that fell apart.

I suspect your experience may be better as you're still under the original bumper-to-bumper, but as a CPO car the dealer as well as Toyota Certified were anything but helpful up front.

It's been said many times, but Toyota and their dealers have no idea how to provide the same level of service their competitors that are selling $85k cars are... If it doesn't resolve you should continue to pursue and don't take no for an answer.
 

kevinfoutch

SILVER Star
Joined
Nov 4, 2015
Messages
602
Location
Denver
Might be out my league here, but only because I've been researching DBA rotors and other options for a upgrade soon, several others have commented that new rotors (regardless of brand) require a break-in procedure. Could that play a part here?
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
449
Location
Parker, CO
In theory most/all brakes should be broken in. Any oil-based anti-corrosive agent on rotors (if present) should be wiped clean before install, and then most manufacturers are going to recommend something along the lines of the following - this is Hawk's:

"After installing new pads make 6 to 10 stops from approximately 35 mph with moderate pressure. Make an additional two to three hard stops from approximately 40 to 45 mph. Do not allow the vehicle to come to a complete stop. When completed with this process, park the vehicle and allow the brakes to cool completely before driving on them again. Do not engage the parking brake until after this cooling process is compete."

To be fair, I didn't get a chance to do this on the LC as my wife picked it up while I was out of town, but something akin to that should have been replicated by her drive home. Still, one wouldn't expect pulsing & vibration like this as an ongoing issue.
 

Canyonero

Beating up Land Cruisers since 2015
Joined
Mar 10, 2015
Messages
641
Location
Centennial, CO
Just throwing this out there, but a wheel out of balance could exacerbate a rotor issue - are we sure the wheels are all balanced? Good luck.
 
Joined
May 23, 2017
Messages
7
Location
USA
Wheels are perfect at 70mph. It's just when you hit the brakes. FWIW, I saw a BMW with a new set of Pirelli Cinturato P7's that were out of round. The owner had a vibration he noticed at higher speeds and the shop he uses for mechanical work was trying to determine the cause. The tech used a piece of chalk and held it steady while moving it across the tire. Guess what?

Pirelli Tire 1.jpg


Pirelli Tire 2.jpg
 
Joined
May 23, 2017
Messages
7
Location
USA
I've also heard that Centric, Stoptech and some others make a better disc. Don't go with anything drilled. Slotted are fine but so are solid face vented discs. Pagid make good brake pads. They'll make more dust but they work really well.
 
Joined
Apr 27, 2011
Messages
2,997
Location
San Diego
Brakes are a wear item. If one has issues, it's time for a brake job.

This particular vehicle is hard on brake rotors. So that may need to be changed earlier than expected for most cars.

OEM is by far the best balance of quality and performance. Going aftermarket may be a better value, but generally is not higher quality. And will have compromises such as cold pad performance, dusting, wear. Unless your use case is significantly different tha typical, I'd go with OEM.
 

Hornd

SILVER Star
Joined
Dec 18, 2013
Messages
2,577
Location
Toledo, OH
http://www.powerstop.com/brake-pad-break-in-procedure/

Brake Pad Break-In Procedure
Posted: Friday, March 28th, 2014


IMPORTANT: BREAK IN NEW BRAKE PADS/ROTORS USING THE PAD BEDDING PROCEDURE AS FOLLOWS. PROPER PAD BEDDING CAN PREVENT ROTOR WARPING.
The break in procedure is critical to brake performance. The reason for a proper break in is to establish an even layer of friction material deposited on the rotors from the brake pads. It is very important that this initial layer of friction material is evenly distributed.

Break in the pads as follows:

5 moderate to aggressive stops from 40 mph down to 10 mph in rapid succession without letting the brakes cool and do not come to a complete stop. If you're forced to stop, either shift into neutral or give room in front so you can allow the vehicle to roll slightly while waiting for the light. The rotors will be very hot and holding down the brake pedal will allow the pad to create an imprint on the rotor. This is where the judder can originate from.
Then do 5 moderate stops from 35 mph to 5 mph in rapid succession without letting the brakes cool. You should expect to smell some resin as the brakes get hot.
After this is complete, drive around for as long as possible without excessively heating the brakes and without coming to a complete stop (Try for about 5 minutes at moderate speed). This is the cooling stage. It allows the heated resin in the brake pads to cool and cure.
After the brakes have cooled to standard operating temperature, you may use the brakes normally.
 

mark71

 
Joined
Feb 2, 2009
Messages
1,095
Proper break in was something I learned about on this forum. Haven't had "warping" since.

But also I learned to not hold the vehicle at a stop using the brakes after very hard braking, like after an emergency-type stop. Instead, put it in neutral or park and get your foot off the brake pedal. Otherwise you are holding the pad against the very hot rotor and it will deposit/burn some material to the rotor. This causes the high spot we all call "warp".

If you want more detailed information, I think it was the Stop Tech website that had a very good article on this. Was discussed on this forum a few years back, IIRC.
 
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