Ballpark estimate for work on 2000 LX 470 from craigslist, diagnosed by a toyota dealership (details in post)

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Hey there folks I'm new to posting here, been lurking for some time and getting the ball rolling on entering this world. As title says, I brought a 2000 LX 470 (173k miles, asking $12,800) to a toyota dealership for a full used car inspection to essentially get a green/red light. Important to note, the truck has 0 rust and no motor issues, the body and interior are all in great shape. The issues they found are in the attached images.

I'm really wondering just how serious are some of these things (specifically the axle boot kits), are they doable DIY project stuff (like some of the electrical stuff I assume I could do myself), and any ballpark estimates on how much some of this might cost. The dealership quoted insanely high labor rates, and I'm aware a dealership is always going to find a laundry list of issues, so thought I'd come here and see what the experts think.

Green or red light??

E4F1D15B-A5DD-4B5F-9B14-73147D09EDCC.jpeg


CE3BC9A7-8A5A-4256-B486-FC13FB3962A2.jpeg
 

jtb517

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All of those should be fairly straight forward DIY jobs with the exception of the valve cover gaskets which aren’t hard … just more involved.

If you search you should be able to find write ups for virtually all of these here on the forums.
 

e9999

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Welcome!

It's a good idea to have it checked by a dealer. May give you a worse case estimate that you can use for negotiations. However, oddly, they do not include parts in this estimate. That will add up quite a bit. What's with that?
And, yes, typically a reasonable DIY could do a lot of what they have found. Regarding the boots for instance, there are vids around showing how to change them. It's not a very difficult job for an experienced motorhead but will take some time and is not something that the average Joe would normally contemplate doing. Have a look, that will give you a good idea.
As to the labor rates, they may be insane in absolute terms, but not too surprising for a Toyota or Lexus dealer in many places so you may want to plan for that if you think you may use a dealer for some of your later needs. Of course, an independent will likely be cheaper.
Keep in mind that an older LX will be expensive to fix and maintain, even if you do a lot of it yourself. It was a top of the line luxury vehicle...
 

JunkCrzr89

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I love Cruisers, but my general advice has always been this: If you don’t have (A) deep pockets to pay a shop for parts and labor for maintenance and repairs, or (B) the skill, knowledge, tools, and/or time to do most maintenance and repairs yourself, then don’t buy a Cruiser that’s >10 years old.
 

Tanner H

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If that is all they found to be repaired/replaced then I would buy it.

Everything on that list you have is fairly easy and actually very common when people buy these rigs from ''normal'' people and they make their way over to us.


This forum has touched based on every single one of those ''issues'' with pages of walk-throughs on how to replace/repair.

CV boot axle and wheel bearings

Probably the most labor intensive on that list. If you have the motivation to learn/work on your own truck and have the tools then that would save you a ton of cash. The reboot kits are sold by toyota in neat little packages for about 60.00 per axle. I've rebooted both axles start to finish with about 1.5 hours per side. no special tools needed, just a good set of tools and some patience. wheel bearings are also pretty straight forward but require a special socket that is about 20-30 dolalrs on amazon.

Valve cover gaskets
Very easy and straight forward


Door locks:
common on these. the motor inside the actuators die after 20 years. They will try to sell you new actuators for close to 300 bucks EACH. The motors inside are about 5 dollars each and can be replaced easily, but once again just takes time to take everything apart.


Driver master switch:

aftermarket version is on amazon for like 30 bucks and takes ten seconds to swap out.
 
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JohnVee

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I agree with the others. Most of this is doable by the average Joe, more so if he has a decent place to work, access to a couple tools he might not have - just in case (and Auto Zone-types have loaner tools) - and the patience for occasionally reading 37-page long threads about how to make a repair. Having a FSM (Factory Service Manual) is a huge dose of courage if you want to do your own work. Seriously. Also keep in mind that those labor prices will be pure savings when it comes time to explain to your spouse why you're busy on the weekends, plus that can buy a LOT of tools!

Noticing that you're in DC then you might not have a garage or carport or even driveway to work in. I hope you do.

If you're truly rust free, look into Fluid Film to keep the undercarriage that way.

Also, there are a lot of local MD/VA/DC folks near you. The CLCC club meets monthly and does more than a few events throughout the year, including tech days where people that need help or tools can get it. Pop in and say hello!

This info from SLEE is good to use when shopping. Maybe you already did, but here it is anyway. Just ignore wherever it says "80". 100 Series Newbie Guide - Slee Off Road - https://sleeoffroad.com/tech-zone/100-series-newbie-guide/
 
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Hey first of all I want to thank everyone who has replied here for the speed and thoughtfulness of yalls responses. This community is awesome. I'm in a stalemate in the negotiation right now so no updates but will update accordingly if I pull the trigger on it. Now to hopefully find someone in the DC/northern virginia area who wants to mentor me and help out with the potential rig. Tools and a jack are two things i dont have. Oh and also flat ground.

I agree with the others. Most of this is doable by the average Joe, more so if he has a decent place to work, access to a couple tools he might not have - just in case (and Auto Zone-types have loaner tools) - and the patience for occasionally reading 37-page long threads about how to make a repair. Having a FSM (Factory Service Manual) is a huge dose of courage if you want to do your own work. Seriously. Also keep in mind that those labor prices will be pure savings when it comes time to explain to your spouse why you're busy on the weekends, plus that can buy a LOT of tools!

Noticing that you're in DC then you might not have a garage or carport or even driveway to work in. I hope you do.

If you're truly rust free, look into Fluid Film to keep the undercarriage that way.

Also, there are a lot of local MD/VA/DC folks near you. The CLCC club meets monthly and does more than a few events throughout the year, including tech days where people that need help or tools can get it. Pop in and say hello!

This info from SLEE is good to use when shopping. Maybe you already did, but here it is anyway. Just ignore wherever it says "80". 100 Series Newbie Guide - Slee Off Road - https://sleeoffroad.com/tech-zone/100-series-newbie-guide/
This is all crazy helpful dude. Thank you so much.

If that is all they found to be repaired/replaced then I would buy it.

Everything on that list you have is fairly easy and actually very common when people buy these rigs from ''normal'' people and they make their way over to us.


This forum has touched based on every single one of those ''issues'' with pages of walk-throughs on how to replace/repair.

CV boot axle and wheel bearings

Probably the most labor intensive on that list. If you have the motivation to learn/work on your own truck and have the tools then that would save you a ton of cash. The reboot kits are sold by toyota in neat little packages for about 60.00 per axle. I've rebooted both axles start to finish with about 1.5 hours per side. no special tools needed, just a good set of tools and some patience. wheel bearings are also pretty straight forward but require a special socket that is about 20-30 dolalrs on amazon.

Valve cover gaskets
Very easy and straight forward


Door locks:
common on these. the motor inside the actuators die after 20 years. They will try to sell you new actuators for close to 300 bucks EACH. The motors inside are about 5 dollars each and can be replaced easily, but once again just takes time to take everything apart.


Driver master switch:

aftermarket version is on amazon for like 30 bucks and takes ten seconds to swap out.
Thank you so much for all of this info. Really convincing me to pull the trigger on this.

Welcome!

It's a good idea to have it checked by a dealer. May give you a worse case estimate that you can use for negotiations. However, oddly, they do not include parts in this estimate. That will add up quite a bit. What's with that?
And, yes, typically a reasonable DIY could do a lot of what they have found. Regarding the boots for instance, there are vids around showing how to change them. It's not a very difficult job for an experienced motorhead but will take some time and is not something that the average Joe would normally contemplate doing. Have a look, that will give you a good idea.
As to the labor rates, they may be insane in absolute terms, but not too surprising for a Toyota or Lexus dealer in many places so you may want to plan for that if you think you may use a dealer for some of your later needs. Of course, an independent will likely be cheaper.
Keep in mind that an older LX will be expensive to fix and maintain, even if you do a lot of it yourself. It was a top of the line luxury vehicle...
Thinking they didn't include parts because it was a toyota dealership and maybe they cant see parts numbers for lexus...? I would think they'd have access to that
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Washington D. C.
If that is all they found to be repaired/replaced then I would buy it.

Everything on that list you have is fairly easy and actually very common when people buy these rigs from ''normal'' people and they make their way over to us.


This forum has touched based on every single one of those ''issues'' with pages of walk-throughs on how to replace/repair.

CV boot axle and wheel bearings

Probably the most labor intensive on that list. If you have the motivation to learn/work on your own truck and have the tools then that would save you a ton of cash. The reboot kits are sold by toyota in neat little packages for about 60.00 per axle. I've rebooted both axles start to finish with about 1.5 hours per side. no special tools needed, just a good set of tools and some patience. wheel bearings are also pretty straight forward but require a special socket that is about 20-30 dolalrs on amazon.

Valve cover gaskets
Very easy and straight forward


Door locks:
common on these. the motor inside the actuators die after 20 years. They will try to sell you new actuators for close to 300 bucks EACH. The motors inside are about 5 dollars each and can be replaced easily, but once again just takes time to take everything apart.


Driver master switch:

aftermarket version is on amazon for like 30 bucks and takes ten seconds to swap out.
Could you potentially help me find what actual parts I need for the master switch and motors inside the door lock actuators?
 
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Could you potentially help me find what actual parts I need for the master switch and motors inside the door lock actuators?
If I'm not mistaken they are suggesting to do a diagnosis on all lock actuators and master switch, like what others have mentioned you can do most of this work you can also look up parts online just to get an idea of the cost. I would buy it if all that was listed is all it needs.
 

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