anyone out there had a diesel swap done in their 200?

Discussion in '200-Series Cruisers' started by uzj100, Dec 4, 2018.

  1. Taco2Cruiser

    Taco2Cruiser Friend of BudBuilt

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    Well... on the highway.

    Back when I lived in El Paso, a good friend had a 2014 Jeep GC Diesel. Pretty sure it also has a 24 something gallon tank. Anyway, we would expore when work permitted and everytime, he had only about a bit over a gallon more than me at the end of the day.

    We would turn around at half a tank (both carried 8 gallon of spare fuel).

    So yes he had more, but it wasn’t enough to make a real functional difference.

    Diesel aside. His transfer case clutches over heated a lot (something we don’t even have) and his Jeep turned off when driving home. Like, at 75 mph. Just turned right off. Sad really.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2018
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  2. TonyP

    TonyP GOLD Star

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    If MPGs are a concern, I think 11,500 gallons of petrol is a better deal than a diesel swap.
     
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  3. HRTROB

    HRTROB

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    Sure thing, send me a PM when you arrive :)

    I don't think it's because of the high speed roads. I just came from a month and a half vacation in the US, driving over 3,000 miles in CA, NV, AZ, MI, IL and NY and never found any situations where a diesel 200 would have a hard time. If my rental Malibu with a small 4cyl turbo running on cheap 87 unleaded could do it, then it would be no problem for the 200 :) It's probably due to the stricter EPA standards, and not enough demand to justify the costs to bring it in.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2018
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  4. TeCKis300

    TeCKis300

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    Surely don't mean that a diesel 200 would have a hard time on the open roads. Far from it. Yet most Americans would be let down a bit with only 250 hp on a 6000lb rig. Especially for a top of the line model that it is. This has been true for many models that offer a diesel engine option. The gasser is the performance option, diesel the efficiency option.
     
  5. Tonytbts

    Tonytbts

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    Another Aussie calling in.

    A year ago I moved from a 4litre petrol Prado (120) to a diesel 200 solely because Toyota was ceasing the sale of the petrol variant in the Prado, and I didn’t want the 2.8litre diesel that is in the new Prado.

    I reckon there are two main reasons for the diesel dominance here - economy is the big one, and a distant second is the almost religious belief that diesel is the only choice in the bush.

    My cruiser with ALL the fruit weighs in at 7700 pounds before loading luggage for a trip (but with 72 gallons of diesel in the tanks). The motor has been retuned and makes a lot more power and torque than stock. The torque converter lock-up also helps performance.

    Around town I average 14.5 (U.S.) mpg and around 18 on the highway. Vehicles with a standard tune get better than that.

    Petrol and diesel are currently over AUD $6.00 or U.S. $4.20 per U.S. gallon where I live in North Queensland.

    While I don’t drag a caravan, very, very many cruiser-owners do. The efficiency advantages of diesel over petrol really matter once you hook up a ‘van.

    With a highway range of over 1200 miles, ready availability of fuel is irrelevant to me, but because EVERY grazing property in the bush runs almost entirely on diesel, it is true that diesel is more readily available in the middle of nowhere.

    The ubiquity of diesel in the bush and a long heritage of diesel Cruisers, Land Rovers and Nissan Patrols has established diesel as the only fuel for a “serious” 4WD, and that belief is an article of faith for every off road magazine, so is constantly being reinforced.

    Toyota struggles to sell petrol 200’s here, but I cannot understand why anyone in the U.S. would do a diesel conversion.

    YMMV, Tony
     
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  6. LandCruiserPhil

    LandCruiserPhil Peter Pan Syndrome Supporting Vendor

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    Its a really nice engine but not worth anywhere that money.
    You can expect 16-19mpg out of a 7000lb VDJ powered Land Cruiser as I have spent several 1000s miles in one.
    Just logged near a couple 1000 miles on the the VDJ single turbo version in a 4 door 79 series. For me the difference between the two is day and night as its hard to believe its the same motor with just 1 less turbo.

    Range in a Maltec Pathenger LC200 series is ~1400 miles as they carry 80gals;)

    The diesel thing in the USA is funny because the guys in Germany think the 5.7 is bad ass and are working on getting one. I see it as "people always want what dont have".

    VDJ Single turbo in front twin turbo behind it

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2018 at 9:08 AM
  7. LandCruiserPhil

    LandCruiserPhil Peter Pan Syndrome Supporting Vendor

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    The gas may win in a drag race but the D4D is not short on power in the least. Very nicely balanced in the LC IMO, my wife calls it a jet fighter from the way it sounds under power. After watching a D4D own the dunes of Tunisia for the last few weeks I call it a jet fighter with afterburners as nothing touched it. Nothing like power anytime you want it.
     
  8. Wicked0ne18

    Wicked0ne18

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    It's pretty cool doing motor swap for kicks. Have something that's different at least in terms of diesel here in the states.

    But that all motor v8 is a legend. One day when Toyota decides to drop the v8 im sure folks going to miss the v8.
     
  9. linuxgod

    linuxgod

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    I would have opted for a diesel if it was available in the US over the petrol version, mainly for the improvement in MPG when towing. Yes there's less HP but it's a friggin truck - if you want a vehicle to snap your neck back when you hit the gas, buy a sports car! ;)

    Swapping in a diesel in the US makes no sense to me though unless you have a blown motor (and even then it doesn't really make sense, it's just an excuse to do it). Certainly a fun project to tackle and make you known as the guy who did it though.
     
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  10. TeCKis300

    TeCKis300

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    Just so we're not talking past each other.

    Power of a vehicle is measured in HP. That's what performs work when measured against time. So performance of the work to pull a rig up a hill (especially higher speeds), and passing on single lane roads, that's what HP tells us. I think we’ve all heard the saying, power to weight. 250hp to a 7000lb laden rig, or in my use towing, 250hp to 14,000lbs… I don't want to be sitting behind a big rig in the far right lane doing 40mph up a hill.

    Torque is a measure of twisting force. This is also important and potentially tells us how much pull is available without chasing rpm. A diesel feels much more responsive at low rpm. Especially for those that like to “drive torque”, i.e. don’t rev the engine. An important point is when we talk torque, it’s generally torque at the wheels that we feel. Gearing can make all the torque we’d like at the wheels. Yet diesels make the best of low rpm tractability. You guys are right in that diesels feel great with good low rpm response. The 5.7L is no slouch either.

    Efficiency, hands down, diesels have this. We know the gasser is thirsty.

    Personally I don’t care how an engine goes about making its power, whether gas, diesel, hybrid, EV. For me, it has to make the numbers. The rest of world diesel that’s available in the 200 just doesn’t do it for me. If it were a Cummins, Duramax, or Powerstroke with 400+ hp, and endless torque. Now we're talking.
     
  11. TeCKis300

    TeCKis300

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    Curious if the Maltec had any mods? I do love the sound of turbo's spoolin'.
     
  12. LandCruiserPhil

    LandCruiserPhil Peter Pan Syndrome Supporting Vendor

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    Both stock no spooling heard on either. The turbos are small and variable pitch.
     
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  13. HRTROB

    HRTROB

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    You can hear the turbos spool if you roll the windows down :)
     
  14. cruiseroutfit

    cruiseroutfit Supporting Vendor Moderator

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    The 1VDFTV is an amazing motor and I've really fallen in love with it. That said, even when mildly built (chip, exhaust) it still can't pull as fast as a 3UR. This after very scientific drag races :D

    IMG_0409.JPG
    VDJ200 vs URJ200

    The beauty of the 1VD is the torque and better yet the economy. Even in the heavily laden Expeditions7 vehicles we were getting high teens, in a 3UR that would be 10mpg the way and places we were driving. Would I swap one at such a great cost? Personally no. Then again I don't plan to drive mine across the Canning Stock Route where economy is massive.

    Still love em!

    IMG_4709.JPG
     
  15. Workhorse

    Workhorse

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    Thanks for weighing in here Kurt. What is the range difference you experienced between the two? Did the HEMA truck have a Factory sub-tank? CDan weighed in on a similar thread that he has driven both flavors of 200 and if he ever had to make the choice, it would be the VDFTV hands down.

    This is a great thread. We need more Aussies to weigh in on the differences and benefits/drawbacks of the VDJ.

    I agree with another poster on this subject, it is a human trait to want what you don't have. :)
     
  16. cruiseroutfit

    cruiseroutfit Supporting Vendor Moderator

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    Yes, aux tank so a much higher capacity and economy. I'd suspect one could easily see 800 mile range with the VDJ. I was able to drive the HEMA 200 at sea level in Aus as well as at 4500ft here in SLC, impressive at both but it felt amazingly fun at Sea Level. More recently I spent some time driving different Patriot Campers rigs including their suped up 200 Super Tourer, it's also a very dialed machine but significantly heavier and the 1VD gets a workout. I've spent far more time in the single turbo VDJ7x models (driving across 5 continents with E7 and our recent XO Simpson Crossing trip), I prefer the manual in those applications but make no allusions it's faster, just a bit more fun to me personally.
     
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  17. tempestv8

    tempestv8

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    The next gen Land Cruiser (300 series?) will most likely drop the 5.7 V8 in favor of a twin turbo 3.5 litre V6, lifted straight out of the current Lexus LS500 sedan.

    When that happens, I would seriously consider that engine, as I think it will be more economical than the 5.7 yet have the grunt of the 4.5 VD twin turbo diesel. For me, this will be the ideal compromise.
     
  18. TeCKis300

    TeCKis300

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    ^Agreed that is the likely scenario. Perhaps dressed and tuned with different turbo's and cams for truck duty, to make the low end even more tractable.

    If the rest of industry is any indication, there might also be a hybrid variant. I'd welcome this as electric motor torque fill would be huge. Along with the efficiency that it brings.

    Looking at the just announced new gen Rav4, an incredible 41/37/39 mpg (city/hwy/combined)
    Jeep Wrangler already has a well reviewed hybrid drivetrain at 23/25/24 mpg (city/highway/combined). There's even a PHEV Wrangler on the horizion.

    Perhaps the 300-series will put up diesel like mpg numbers, with diesel like low end tractability, and gasser performance. Now if Toyota would just stop dragging their feet.
     
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  19. bloc

    bloc SILVER Star

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    Not that Toyota’s recent diesels are reliability kings but I have trouble seeing a highly stressed turbo v6 getting anywhere near “diesel-like” durability.
     
  20. M1911

    M1911

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    Turbo motors of today aren’t turbo motors of our youth during the 1980s — they are a lot more reliable than they used to be.

    And diesel motors of today aren’t the low-stressed, live-forever, naturally-aspirated diesels of our youth either. Today’s diesels, with multiple turbos, urea injection, high pressure injection, emissions regen systems, and lighter blocks make much more power that the old diesels, but also require much more maintenance.

    It seems there is no free lunch.

    Btw, I seem to recall that the most popular engine for the F-150 is the 2.7l turbo V6.
     
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