97 land cruiser with rust

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Mar 23, 2021
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so long story short... I inherited my dads prized possession, his ‘97 Land Cruiser with about 213k miles on it. It sat for over a year (I know huge mistake) and I have now replaced the battery and changed the oil and filter. I am not super knowledgeable about cars but I did own a 2000 4Runner for about six years and I know these babies run forever if taken care of. My dad left me tons of automotive tools and pretty much everything I feel like I would need to get the cruiser up and running great again, just a little confused on where to start.
Also, there is a good bit of rust underneath that I would like to have repaired... does anyone know how much damage has already been done though? My current next steps are to flush the coolant and replace it and do trans fluid and brakes too. This is my first post so I’m probably forgetting a lot, but any advice would be incredibly appreciated.

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Joined
Mar 23, 2021
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knoxville tn
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so long story short... I inherited my dads prized possession, his ‘97 Land Cruiser with about 213k miles on it. It sat for over a year (I know huge mistake) and I have now replaced the battery and changed the oil and filter. I am not super knowledgeable about cars but I did own a 2000 4Runner for about six years and I know these babies run forever if taken care of. My dad left me tons of automotive tools and pretty much everything I feel like I would need to get the cruiser up and running great again, just a little confused on where to start.
Also, there is a good bit of rust underneath that I would like to have repaired... does anyone know how much damage has already been done though? My current next steps are to flush the coolant and replace it and do trans fluid and brakes too. This is my first post so I’m probably forgetting a lot, but any advice would be incredibly appreciated.

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minus the exhaust it really doesn't look that bad. Id take a paint scraper and work on getting the flakes out, then wire wheel it an por-15 the undercarriage looks like your rocker is rotting Id get that fixed stat and check the rear quarter panels those will probably be rotted though. Use osvo to convert rust.
 
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Not sure of the nature of the inheritance, but I hope you are doing well.

Here’s a good primer.


A needle scaler is a good suggestion, but it will require a sizable vertical compressor with a high CFM output. If your are new to wrenching on cars, start investing in brushless, cordless tools. Pick a system you like (I use Milwaukee) and purchase a die grinder, angle grinder, and drill.

Buy the disposables at Harbor Freight or Amazon. This includes wire brushes, sanding and flap disks and have at it. Wear proper protection for the eyes and dust protection.
 
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Nice looking, well setup, locked 80 you got there!

Good advice above.

Since it may be your first time to get into rust I'll add the suggestions to just focus on an easy spot first and then develop your process and skills over time. If you get into the habit of knocking out rusty areas a little at a time and regularly you'll get through it all faster than you may expect. Once you know the process you can decide if you want to do it all in a weekend or over time. A benefit of getting under there periodically though is that you notice if past areas need more attention because rust peeked back through.

I'd hold off on por or similar "final" coatings until you know that you've gotten the underlying loose rust off and the remaining surfaces well converted with a rust converter like Ospho. Once you get the loose stuff off and the rust converter on the pressure eases a lot as you've pretty much stopped the rust though the metal is somewhat exposed. My preference is often to stay in this converted place for a while to do repeated cleaning and coatings until the metal is really stable and rust free.

Top coat the converted rust with appropriate paint, fluid film or similar, as you prefer, when you know you've knocked it all out.

You can do a lot with a few small stainless steel brushes, a cheap package of "acid brushes" and a few small bottles of "rust converter". I keep these on hand and use them when I see rust the many steel/iron possessions that I care for.

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