PTO Winch Information (16 Viewers)

Joined
Mar 9, 2020
Messages
16
Location
Netherlands
The shaft is located behind the middle of the bumper in my case, unable to reach with a handle through the bumper because there is no hole.
The idea was if you would end up not being able to start the engine but would like to winch for some reason, get the handle out and winch manually, even though it will take a LOT of time.
Thinking of fabricating a handle, and drill a hole in the bumper so the handle can fit through, before i send the bumper for hot dip galv.

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Joined
Jun 13, 2014
Messages
610
Location
Milano - Italy
that'the shaft .
a hole in the bumper is not that terrible .
but I would try to turn that shaft with the car load on it .
it might not be possible by hand .
Also thought that maybe the shaft was NOT intended to be turned by hand .
but more to used as a front PTO for the use of water pump , wood saw , ecc .
so before making a hole in your nice virgin bumper , pls investigate
 
Joined
Jun 13, 2014
Messages
610
Location
Milano - Italy
I certainly don't have such a strong grip end force to turn a loaded winch just rotating the shaft with bare hands ...
mayby with the car deep in mud till the doors .
the more I think of the time when the BJ40 winches were designed and made , and the general working use that was intended for these trucks , I think it was more an option to add other working units then to hand operate the winch .
but I may be drammatico wrong
 

jblueridge

SILVER Star
Joined
Aug 12, 2014
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2,081
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Near Charlottesville, VA
I have a winch like Dan’s without the shaft that sticks out forward.
During a self recovery, the stack of rocks I had made gave way and when the truck slipped down, the winch shear pin sheared in 2.
The truck was then pulling the winch cable with some force and there was no way to loosen the tension except by cutting the strap I had around the tree anchor.

I bet that hex shaped shaft is for relieving tension or moving the spool when then pin has sheared itself.
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2016
Messages
285
Location
Somerset KY
If you are disassembling the rollers for the fairlead you will need to use a torch and a shop press.
The long rollers have bushings on either end that are about 50mm long. You will not need to heat the entire roller, just each end. I used a 19mm impact socket to support the fairlead frame while I got the exposed end of the bolt pressed down into the roller. After that, a length of thick walled steel pipe for support. Use a steel bar to press once the bolt is inside the roller. It helps to add some lubricant into the roller once you get some space in there, its acts as a reservoir throughout the job.
After disassembly I noticed the the vertical bolts for the rollers came with at least 2 different thread pitches. Interesting, there would have to be 2 different part numbers to confirm this and could possibly help date a winch head.

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Joined
Feb 15, 2016
Messages
285
Location
Somerset KY
Is anyone here a machinist? I could use some new shafts. I made a quick CAD drawing. Can email upon request. Yes I know my dimensioning scheme sucks.

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Last edited:
Joined
Jun 13, 2014
Messages
610
Location
Milano - Italy
Good decision to remake them ,
Pls be aware that once done , best would to give them a galvanized treatment.
The position of these shaft and the infrequent use will unevitably result in corrosion action.
Ref the different thread between the vertical and orizontal shaft , I don't recall such difference , but some years have passed from that .
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2016
Messages
285
Location
Somerset KY
Good decision to remake them ,
Pls be aware that once done , best would to give them a galvanized treatment.
The position of these shaft and the infrequent use will unevitably result in corrosion action.
Ref the different thread between the vertical and orizontal shaft , I don't recall such difference , but some years have passed from that .
Any galvanizing or other corrosion preventitive coating would be quickly worn away at the contact surfaces. I would have left my shafts stuck inside the rollers but doing so would allow rotation at the fairlead frame, causing wear. The design intent is for the roller to roll on the shaft. Friction is reduced simply by decreasing surface contact by means of the bushings on each end of the roller. Regular use and installing the shaft into the roller with a quality "waterproof" grease would help to prevent the two parts from becoming seized. A 4x4 type grease fitting could be installed at each end of the roller with a counterbore to prevent damage by the cable. This could be done at home on a drill press with relative ease.
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2016
Messages
285
Location
Somerset KY
If you need to service your pillow block assembly you can press apart without damage. I stood my pillow block up and let it soak in a pool of PB blaster for a week before I attempted disassembly. You can only press one way because of the geometry of the shaft and bearing housing. The bearing that was in mine was an SKF 6205DA. I am replacing with a SKF 6205DDU C3 ( the C3 is the tolerance, see the SKF catalog for more info) the DDU designation is a contact seal on both sides. I am working on having the felt washers reproduced. You may bend the felt covers removing, this is normal. Work them down with a smooth hammer if you do.

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jblueridge

SILVER Star
Joined
Aug 12, 2014
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Near Charlottesville, VA
I replaced the felt dust seals too but I think with the modern double sealed bearings, the felt is no longer needed and probably allows H2O to sit in the pillow block longer.
They are meant to oiled I guess but it might be less maintenance if the felt was replaced with delrin or something non-absorbent.
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2016
Messages
285
Location
Somerset KY
I replaced the felt dust seals too but I think with the modern double sealed bearings, the felt is no longer needed and probably allows H2O to sit in the pillow block longer.
They are meant to oiled I guess but it might be less maintenance if the felt was replaced with delrin or something non-absorbent.
The bearing I removed was double sealed. The felt keeps big debris out. I thought about replacing the felt but you really want something that conforms to the shaft. Since the felt is absorbent, might be best to treat it with a rust preventative., oil, or a water displacing product.

I cant confirm 100%, but I am 99.9% sure the bearing I removed was original. SKF didn't have any info on the part number it was so old.
 
Joined
Mar 3, 2010
Messages
2,050
Location
Japan
@Braden620 if you make the bolts have them drilled for a grease fitting and your never have to take them off to service them again!

@jblueridge As I mentioned earlier in this thread if the pin breaks try having someone bounce up and down on the line while another person pulls to disengage the dog. Of course if your using steel line you will need to use caution if the line is in poor condition and or close to breaking strength and you need to have someone ready on the brakes if there is a chance the truck will roll.

Pete
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2016
Messages
285
Location
Somerset KY
@peteinjp I can update the drawing to include lubrication galleries on each end, no problemo. I wouldn't want anybody's shaft to get galled up. :rofl:

Here is the bearing for the early type pillow block, compared to the old. I actually ordered a C3 clearance but my measurements indicate this is the exact geometry of the OE unit. I am in contact with NSK regarding the NS7S grease that comes in the bearing. Likely will replace with a marine type lithium grease to prevent water intrusion.

I spent a good long while dis-assembling the dog clutch lever. Those original pins were stuck good! I ultimately had to resort to a lot of heat to get the pins out, as they would only move when the parts were hot. In other words, in the service manual they need a torch symbol that corresponds to "some acetylene required".

Why disassemble lever? Spring was shot. I have spec'd out a stainless replacement spring and will provide details later.
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