How To: Sliding Rear Window Seal Repalcement (2 Viewers)

Joined
Jan 7, 2011
Messages
121
Location
Lethbridge AB, Canada
Hey guys/gals:

I've been pretty busy lately and haven't really been a contributor on Mud as much as I would like. My work schedule has slowed down due to the spring season and I've been hammering out the mods and maintenance on my 80. One of those items was the replacement of the rear sliding window seals. Mine were not leaking, but it was something I wanted to PM with my Arizona Original rust-free LX450. I will apologize in advance, I forgot my SLR at home this day, so your blessed with some under-exposed cell phone photos instead.

Here is a photo of the part #'s that I ordered:



These parts include:
2x Vent Louver (L and R)
2x Belt Moulding (L and R)
2x Rear Window Seal (L and R)


1. Remove the rear interior panels around the wheels wells. Unscrew the silver lip moudling holding the carpet down near your tailgate, then gently pop out the two (L and R) interior panels. They are attached with several typical toyota clips. A little pull and they should pop out. No photos of this...

2. Next up, unscrew the bolt on the inside of the rear pillar (D-pillar) that holds the rear "vent louver" in place (at the bottom). I believe it was an 8mm nut. You will also need to pop the two plastic clips free (middle and top).



3. Now remove the "Belt Trim" that runs horizontal on the exterior of your 80, under the rear window. It has 3 or 4 pressure clips that hold it on the body. With your interior panels now out you can reach inside and squeeze them with some plyers to remove the belt strip without breaking the clips (if your re-using the belt strip). Notice the small rubber grommet around each hole, this is what commonly fails with age, causing water to drip into your body panels and rust out your floor jack and/or panels themselves.

Underside of the clips:


Belt Strip/Moulding Removed:


4. Now with everything out of the way, it's time to remove the glass. Start on the inside of the vehicle and use a flaphead screwdriver to pry the window seal to the inside of the seam on the body. See below:

This can be a real PITA so take your time and avoid scratching your window tint like I did. In retrospect I would even wrap the end of my screwdriver in tape to dull the edges. I used two screwdrivers and worked the window seam much like trying to seat a MTB bicycle tire on a rim.



Another photo:



5. Once you get the seal over that body seam, the window will begin to unseat itself towards the outside of the vehicle. I worked the seal around about 3/4 of the way, then went and pulled the whole window and seal outwards, standing on the outside of the vehicle. I was able to pull the glass right out.

Glass out:


6. I should mention that I did not replace the inner seal that the glass actually sits on. This would be the time to do this. You would simply remove the old outer seal, exposing the metal frame or track that the glass sits in. Then you would work the glass out of this track before replacing the internal track seal.

At this point I cleaned everything thoroughly and did my best job at cleaning the existing rubber track seals and also the metal glass frame. Once finish I installed the new window seal on the metal frame and prepared to re-install.

7. Here is where a cool trick comes in. Get a small diameter rope maybe 1/4" to 3/8" diameter. I had this nylon rope lying around and it worked quite well. Insert the rope into the slot in the rubber window seal that you want to seat on the body seam, as pictured:



Leave the two ends of rope exposed, so that you can grab hold of them. Pictured below:



8. Now seat the glass back on the body where it needs to go. The rope should be facing the inside. Get someone to apply pressure and hold the window from the outside, pushing the window perpendicular towards the interior. From the inside grab the rope ends, holding one side, pull the other side of the rope to lift the edge of the rubber window seal back over the body seal. Think reversal of how you removed the glass initially, just the rope is now doing the work instead of the screwdriver. Word of caution, you may need to help the rope along when pulling around the corners of the glass. Do this very carefully to avoid the body seam from cutting your new rubber seals.

Pull the rope around:



9. With the glass re-installed, install the vent louver and the accompanying bolt on each side. Be careful with the small rubber seal that runs along the edge of the plastic vent louver. Mine was brand new and was almost fully hanging off out of the box, which made seating the tiny seal a huge PITA.

10. Finally install the belt mouldings. I used a dab of black RTV sealant on each of the plastic clips that hold the belt moulding to the edge of the body, in hopes of eliminating future leaking into the rear quarter panels.

All in all, the job took me 2.5 hours with the help of a friend. Hope this helps someone else out there tackle the project. It's really not bad, just be patient when getting the glass out.
 
Joined
Jan 7, 2011
Messages
121
Location
Lethbridge AB, Canada
Nice write up, how much did you invest in the parts?

Im not exactly sure. I ordered a bunch of other parts at the same time. I just moved and I seemed to have lost the invoice. I would guess I was around $175-$200 for the window parts.

Nice post. Much better way to get the window in than I used this weekend

Thank you Rickashay! I will be using this eventually. Appreciate it.

No Problem, glad you guys will find it valuable. I dont think there are any other write-ups on this specific process so I thought I'd try my hand at a "how-to."
 

tone33

SILVER Star
Joined
Jan 22, 2010
Messages
289
Location
Spring Hill, TN
Great post, this has helped me tackle this. Not a hard job by any means, but great to see how someone else has accomplished it. I have a question though - there are little plastic film weather covers/strips on the bottom of the aluminum window frame. There are 6 rectangular holes, but only 3 are covered with the plastic film. See pics below with the plastic in place, I removed them on my other window frame before really thinking about it. So I have 2 questions:

  1. Does it matter if some of these are missing?
  2. Should all 6 holes be covered? It looks like the other 3 were at some point, but both sides had the same 3 holes covered and uncovered.
IMG_0185.JPG


IMG_0184.JPG



Also, here is my invoice for anyone who needs part numbers/cost estimate (clips and plugs are for something else).

IMG_0186.JPG
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2014
Messages
38
Hey guys/gals:

I've been pretty busy lately and haven't really been a contributor on Mud as much as I would like. My work schedule has slowed down due to the spring season and I've been hammering out the mods and maintenance on my 80. One of those items was the replacement of the rear sliding window seals. Mine were not leaking, but it was something I wanted to PM with my Arizona Original rust-free LX450. I will apologize in advance, I forgot my SLR at home this day, so your blessed with some under-exposed cell phone photos instead.

Here is a photo of the part #'s that I ordered:



These parts include:
2x Vent Louver (L and R)
2x Belt Moulding (L and R)
2x Rear Window Seal (L and R)


1. Remove the rear interior panels around the wheels wells. Unscrew the silver lip moudling holding the carpet down near your tailgate, then gently pop out the two (L and R) interior panels. They are attached with several typical toyota clips. A little pull and they should pop out. No photos of this...

2. Next up, unscrew the bolt on the inside of the rear pillar (D-pillar) that holds the rear "vent louver" in place (at the bottom). I believe it was an 8mm nut. You will also need to pop the two plastic clips free (middle and top).



3. Now remove the "Belt Trim" that runs horizontal on the exterior of your 80, under the rear window. It has 3 or 4 pressure clips that hold it on the body. With your interior panels now out you can reach inside and squeeze them with some plyers to remove the belt strip without breaking the clips (if your re-using the belt strip). Notice the small rubber grommet around each hole, this is what commonly fails with age, causing water to drip into your body panels and rust out your floor jack and/or panels themselves.

Underside of the clips:


Belt Strip/Moulding Removed:


4. Now with everything out of the way, it's time to remove the glass. Start on the inside of the vehicle and use a flaphead screwdriver to pry the window seal to the inside of the seam on the body. See below:

This can be a real PITA so take your time and avoid scratching your window tint like I did. In retrospect I would even wrap the end of my screwdriver in tape to dull the edges. I used two screwdrivers and worked the window seam much like trying to seat a MTB bicycle tire on a rim.



Another photo:



5. Once you get the seal over that body seam, the window will begin to unseat itself towards the outside of the vehicle. I worked the seal around about 3/4 of the way, then went and pulled the whole window and seal outwards, standing on the outside of the vehicle. I was able to pull the glass right out.

Glass out:


6. I should mention that I did not replace the inner seal that the glass actually sits on. This would be the time to do this. You would simply remove the old outer seal, exposing the metal frame or track that the glass sits in. Then you would work the glass out of this track before replacing the internal track seal.

At this point I cleaned everything thoroughly and did my best job at cleaning the existing rubber track seals and also the metal glass frame. Once finish I installed the new window seal on the metal frame and prepared to re-install.

7. Here is where a cool trick comes in. Get a small diameter rope maybe 1/4" to 3/8" diameter. I had this nylon rope lying around and it worked quite well. Insert the rope into the slot in the rubber window seal that you want to seat on the body seam, as pictured:



Leave the two ends of rope exposed, so that you can grab hold of them. Pictured below:



8. Now seat the glass back on the body where it needs to go. The rope should be facing the inside. Get someone to apply pressure and hold the window from the outside, pushing the window perpendicular towards the interior. From the inside grab the rope ends, holding one side, pull the other side of the rope to lift the edge of the rubber window seal back over the body seal. Think reversal of how you removed the glass initially, just the rope is now doing the work instead of the screwdriver. Word of caution, you may need to help the rope along when pulling around the corners of the glass. Do this very carefully to avoid the body seam from cutting your new rubber seals.

Pull the rope around:



9. With the glass re-installed, install the vent louver and the accompanying bolt on each side. Be careful with the small rubber seal that runs along the edge of the plastic vent louver. Mine was brand new and was almost fully hanging off out of the box, which made seating the tiny seal a huge PITA.

10. Finally install the belt mouldings. I used a dab of black RTV sealant on each of the plastic clips that hold the belt moulding to the edge of the body, in hopes of eliminating future leaking into the rear quarter panels.

All in all, the job took me 2.5 hours with the help of a friend. Hope this helps someone else out there tackle the project. It's really not bad, just be patient when getting the glass out.



Very nice work,,,reminds the night I replaced my windshield by myself. Thank you for the write up.


CRUISER CARTEL
 
Joined
May 6, 2016
Messages
130
Location
Los Angeles, San Francisco, or Gilbert, AZ
Great post, this has helped me tackle this. Not a hard job by any means, but great to see how someone else has accomplished it. I have a question though - there are little plastic film weather covers/strips on the bottom of the aluminum window frame. There are 6 rectangular holes, but only 3 are covered with the plastic film. See pics below with the plastic in place, I removed them on my other window frame before really thinking about it. So I have 2 questions:

  1. Does it matter if some of these are missing?
  2. Should all 6 holes be covered? It looks like the other 3 were at some point, but both sides had the same 3 holes covered and uncovered.
View attachment 1015337

View attachment 1015339


Also, here is my invoice for anyone who needs part numbers/cost estimate (clips and plugs are for something else).

View attachment 1015340

I'm not sure how much help this will be 3 years later but I just takled this same job and I think I can answer your questions.

The little plastic film weather covers are there to theoretically prevent outside water or spray from coming into your window frame because they are only under the space of the front sliding window which is the window that is farthest ourtboard in the sliding window assembly. On each sliding window frame there are 6 total holes on the bottom and the 3 most forward ones are covered. I have confirmed this with my LX450 as well as sone 94 LC sliding windows I got from the junkyard.

I'm not sure how much this actually helps in preventing water from spraying up into your window frame since virtually all of the window frames I have taken apart were filthy with calcium/ road salt/ gunk/ aluminum oxide (from the frame being repeatedly wet)/ and dust which leads me to believe that the window frame design as well as the large rubber retaining gasket were not designed very well from Toyota. A better design would have been one where the majority of the window and frame are inboard of the body seam and not outboard of it, and, and not sliding. They probably made it mount outboard of the body seam in order to avoid having to remove the interior trim for removal of the window which is a moot point since most people remove the interior trim anyways.

On my truck, after powder coating the aluminum frame to prevent future oxidation and replacing both inner and outer seals, I have opted to install the window WITHOUT the 3 small plastic film covers. We will see if this makes any difference the next time I clean the window frames in 10-20 years. Will report back then :smokin:

Also, did anyone notice that there is a larger and a smaller window latch on each sliding window? I noticed this both on both LX and LC trucks and my theory is that it was made this way in order to allow a savvy owner who locked his keys in the truck to unlock the small sliding latch on the sliding window from the outside with a thin rigid tool by shimmying it up through the closest hole in the frame (the very one covered by the plastic film) and unlatch the smaller sliding window latch. :idea:

I hope some of this information is useful.

:cheers:
 
Joined
May 19, 2017
Messages
275
Location
Vermont
Does this require just the window and rubber gasket?

Yup. I purchased the seals from Toyota and the glass from rockauto. The glass wasn't the right tint to match mine but it can always be tinted. Mine leaked alittle on the passenger side but I blame that on myself and the fact the glass isn't oem, small amount of silicone between the glass and seal on the outside fixed it though
 
Joined
Mar 8, 2012
Messages
82
Location
Virginia
So would p/n 62741-60040 be the part I need to get my glass to slide smoothly? Mine are very difficult to slide open and close.
 
Joined
May 19, 2017
Messages
275
Location
Vermont
If they're hard to open an close you can clean the tracks and use a certain grease for rubber seals like that. I believe one brand that I use is s***zu?
 
Joined
Jan 23, 2018
Messages
167
Location
San Diego, CA
If you are procrastinating on doing this job because of rust in the body under the seal. I highly recommend you do this sooner than later. This rust spot that I noticed was the size of a dime. It was much worse after I got the window out.
FE27F07E-2947-433A-8699-7CA2D7DE8ED6.jpeg
034AEE43-FF13-4D28-B53C-9D6C43DE452D.jpeg
 

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