Alignment Setting Toe

Overland Tailor

Boltripper
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Birmingham, AL
I run .125” in and have had great results. Good track, no float and no dicernable wear other than normal.

The fsm will be for stock 80 and stock tires. You will need to test with your specific setup, so my figures work for me setup but might not for you.

Good luck
 

2fpower

 
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lenexa, ks
Here is my version of an alighnment jig.

First, I found some old rear rotors bolted those inside out to the front -- had to remove the caliper for it to fit on. Bolted them on with all 6 lug nuts. Figured this would give me a larger surface area that’s more accurate alignment -- and exactly where the wheel will be riding. Additionally, I welded my square stock to the rotor, so now I have a permanent alignment tool. Used boost as the test mule as the alignment is perfect on it. Measurement was right at 1/8 inch difference between the front and back of my alignment jig. Toe in of course

Now to go align Yoda and Utah.
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Last edited:
Joined
Aug 18, 2018
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Houston
On the ’80, toe is the only thing easily adjustable. It can be knocked out from wheeling, impact, so should be occasionally checked.

For something that looks deceptively simple, vehicle handling is a complicated subject, there are great books on the subject, this will be the simple version: Toe-in enhances high speed straight-line stability. If set at zero the tires are free to move, play in the system isn’t taken up, steering feels light, prone to darting. With some toe-in, the tires are loaded slightly at odds with each other; this reduces the effect of play in the system, makes the steering feel more solid and reduces the darting effect of bumps. Overall, makes the rig more comfortable to drive. The stock spec is 0-.160”, I find that lifted, big tire rigs like a little more, at the top of spec. If the rig has been modified, it is often best to experiment with settings to find what works best. Like most other alignment settings, a lifted, big tire rig is likely to want different settings than a stock rig for best handling.
View attachment 473525
Does the thread on the tie rod ends need to be the same? I need to do mine but there is few threads showing on the lef side....
 
Joined
Aug 18, 2018
Messages
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Houston
The manual
On the ’80, toe is the only thing easily adjustable. It can be knocked out from wheeling, impact, so should be occasionally checked.

For something that looks deceptively simple, vehicle handling is a complicated subject, there are great books on the subject, this will be the simple version: Toe-in enhances high speed straight-line stability. If set at zero the tires are free to move, play in the system isn’t taken up, steering feels light, prone to darting. With some toe-in, the tires are loaded slightly at odds with each other; this reduces the effect of play in the system, makes the steering feel more solid and reduces the darting effect of bumps. Overall, makes the rig more comfortable to drive. The stock spec is 0-.160”, I find that lifted, big tire rigs like a little more, at the top of spec. If the rig has been modified, it is often best to experiment with settings to find what works best. Like most other alignment settings, a lifted, big tire rig is likely to want different settings than a stock rig for best handling.
View attachment 473525
The manual says to have threaded ends equal parts but mine are not. Do I need to remove the tie rod and unscrew to get it equal? Stock height on my rig but the tie is out on the rh side
 
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Chandler, AZ
The manual

The manual says to have threaded ends equal parts but mine are not. Do I need to remove the tie rod and unscrew to get it equal? Stock height on my rig but the tie is out on the rh side
Probably a tie rod end was replaced and not screwed in the same distance as the other side. As long as the proper adjustment can be made, it's not a problem. If it needs to be fixed, one end needs to be disconnected from the arm and turned until they are even, then the toe set.
 

cody c

 
Joined
Feb 20, 2006
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calgary
If my math is correct, on the basis of measuring a center line along the wheels and comparing front to back, if a 30mm tire nets 2mm:

30" tire 2mm
35" tire 2.33mm
37" tire 2.467mm
41" tire 2.733mm

I've always gone with a bit more and measured off the metal wheel at the front and rear, but I realize that I was going with a bit too much toe in.
 
Joined
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Probably a tie rod end was replaced and not screwed in the same distance as the other side. As long as the proper adjustment can be made, it's not a problem. If it needs to be fixed, one end needs to be disconnected from the arm and turned until they are even, then the toe set.
Thanks bud. Btw are the ends rh thread or Lh thread? If so which side is which? Gonna do this soon.....
 

cody c

 
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Thanks bud. Btw are the ends rh thread or Lh thread? If so which side is which? Gonna do this soon.....
One is LH and the other is RH, like a turnbuckle to hold down a camper. This way you just rotate the tube in the centre and it loosens or tightens, or creates more or less width, and then tighten them up.
 
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One is LH and the other is RH, like a turnbuckle to hold down a camper. This way you just rotate the tube in the centre and it loosens or tightens, or creates more or less width, and then tighten them up.
Do you happen to know which way toes in and which way toes out? I need to clean up the threads as well....
 

cody c

 
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calgary
Do you happen to know which way toes in and which way toes out? I need to clean up the threads as well....
Nope, I don't. But it should be not too hard to figure out. If your TRE's are dirty take a wire brush to them first and you should be able to see which way the thread is angled at. Take a before measurement at front and back, then you'll see as you rotate. Make sure you loosen them rod clamps good, sometimes they are kinda rusted in place
 
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Do you happen to know which way toes in and which way toes out? I need to clean up the threads as well....
When the tie rod is turned one way it will become longer, causing toe in, the other way will become shorter, toe out. Adjust as needed to get the intended result. The assembly can be flipped end to end, installed ether way, doen't really matter.
 

Howard705

TLCA 5505
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and if you've never done one remember they are sensitive since- the arms are less than 1/2 way out to the 15" measuring area and that turning the tie rod turns BOTH threads equally. a little rotation gives you a lot of toe movement. IDK on these but on big trucks for some reason the LR thread was on the RH and visa vesa unless it had been removed. for the RUSTY ones - can beat a screwdriver into the slot to open it up ( clamp moved) then Penetrant into threads that have now been moved away from each other. Can do one at time if really stubborn ( must remove the taper from the arm first) and leave the other side tight using a box end wrench over the taper on the tre as a cheater to turn it. then reassemble and do the other side being sure to put anti seize on first. After all loosened and lubed can turn with channelocks. There is also a tool that looks like a spanner wrench that grabs the slot in the rod and opens it as it rotates it. This is all Rust Belt only SOP for old stuff.
 

Pin_Head

 
 
 
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If is pretty easy to spot if your toe in is out of spec just by eyeball. Just turn the wheels so that the inside side walls of the front tire are in exact line with the sidewalls of the rear tire. Then look at the other side and sight alone the inside side walls. The visual line should hit the rear tire about half an inch outside the sidewall line if they are in spec. It takes about a minute to do and it beats waiting until your tires wear out to find out your toe in s out of spec. I did this on every car I put up on the alignment rack and it is pretty accurate compared to what the machine says.
 
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My driver side was lh thread and my ps was rh thread. Removed the ends completely, cleaned the threads, then lubed with neverseize anti seize. Intslaaed now I can turn the adjuster by hand. Adjusted to have about 1/8 inch toe in. Rides great now pull is gone.
 
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The next step is to set the knuckle stops. Anytime the tie rod has been adjusted, it is very important to confirm that they are correctly adjusted. Their job is to stop the turning of the knuckle, at the knuckle, when the tie rod is adjusted, one side will hit the stop before the other. If the side that isn’t hitting is jammed (like against a rock) the force will be transferred to the other side, through the tie rod, a leading cause of tie rod, steering damage. The goal is to have the stops contact on both sides at the same time. Check/adjust with the steering turned in both directions. Alignment shops often overlook this step.

The last adjustment is centering the steering wheel. I prefer to do it by driving, so assemble, torque everything and put the rig back on the ground. Loosen the clamps on the drag link; get it loosened up, so it turns easily. Drive on a relatively straight, level road, if the wheel is off center; turn the drag link to center it.

Once done a couple of times, this is a simple, quick job. One of those things that almost takes longer to talk about than do.
View attachment 473531
How far out do you measure on the bar?
 
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