Transmission hose replacement using non-OEM parts (1 Viewer)

Joined
Jan 5, 2020
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Seattle, WA
Since I've found this community to be more than helpful in getting my FZJ80 in tip-top shape, I wanted to share some experience replacing the soft transmission hoses using non-OEM parts as almost all are discontinued. This project started after one of the hoses developed a slight tear and sprayed transmission fluid all over the garage floor and in the engine bay. After cleaning everything up and identifying the culprit (it was the return line from the oil cooler to the transmission hard line), given the age of the vehicle (and likely all of the soft transmission lines) I decided to replace all of the hoses while I was in there. So, in an effort to help others, below are the parts, lengths, and vendors (no referral links) below to save some time and use some high-quality parts. That’s unless @NLXTACY decides to put together a kit (hint hint)!

For parts, I ended up using the following:

  • 3/8 ID Continental Insta-Grip™ TC Push-On Hose from Abbott Rubber
  • 3/8 Precision Brand Unicoi from Amazon
  • Spiral wrap hose protector from Amazon
  • Replacement clips from Toyota - P/N 90467-A0012
After buying about ten feet of the hose (much more than required, but I wanted to have plenty left over), I needed to cut all to length. I’ve provided both centimeters and inches for those wanting to have greater precision or convenience.

For the hoses from the hard lines next to the radiator behind the left side / driver side headlight, they need to be cut to:

  • 24cm (10in)
  • 36cm (14in)
For the rear, three separate lines are needed:

  • 41cm (16in)
  • 44cm (17in)
  • 61cm (24in)
The process was as follows:

  • Disconnect and remove battery and tray
  • Disconnect the fan and fan shroud
  • Loosen the belts and then remove the fan and shroud
  • Drain radiator and remove. One may be able to make the replacement without removing the radiator, but I had already determined to flush out the system (will provide details in a separate thread) and realized it would be too challenging to do so with it in there
  • Remove the grill
  • Remove the left side turn light and headlight
  • Remove the turn signals and the turn signal assembly
  • Cut the front lines with a box cutter or other blade being careful not to cut to the metal
    Warm up the front hoses in an oven to the lowest setting available to soften the rubber and make the process infinitely easier
  • Wrap with hose protector where hoses bend or can rub against metal
  • Coat the hard lines and inner hoses with some transmission fluid to ease them back on and remember to slip both clips on before installing
  • Reconnect the front lines, starting the with bottom / shorter hose

DSCF2784.JPG




DSCF2790.JPG



  • Cut the rear lines, again being mindful of the hard lines
  • Heat the remaining three hoses, and coat with the hard lines and inner hoses with transmission fluid as noted above
  • Connect the lines with their corresponding length locations starting with the lines leading to the transmission,
  • With the two transmission lines installed, slip two clips on, but not all the way
  • For the line leading from the transmission to the radiator on the right side, attach the Unicoil and bend close to a 90 degree angle as in the photo below. Once bent, slip the two remaining clips
  • For the short hose from the left-side radiator to the hard lines, slip two clips on the hose, and connect the hose to the furthest hard line leading to the front hoses, again remembering to have both clips installed


DSCF2785.JPG


DSCF2786.JPG


  • For the line connected to the transmission hard line, connect it to the closer hard line. Then wrap the line with hose protector

DSCF2791.JPG



  • When ready, reinstall the headlight, turn lights, and radiator
  • Connect the two lines to the radiator - the curved line to the right side, and the short line to the left side
  • Re-fill the radiator with Toyota pink or red
  • Re-install the fan and shroud
  • Tighten the belts and tighten the fan shroud nuts to spec
  • Re-install the battery tray and connect the battery
  • Refill the transmission with any lost transmission fluid
  • Start the engine and observe for leaks
  • Enjoy and take pride in the work you just accomplished

If I missed anything, or anyone thinks the process can be improved, please feel free to chime in.
 

NLXTACY

Wits' End
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great write up. I used most of what you used but I converted everything to AN fittings on my turbo truck. Putting a kit together isn't a bad idea since I have most of this and I am nearing the end of my third 500ft role of the 3/8" Conti hose (same you used).
 

polloelastico

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May 10, 2020
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I've swapped those hoses out too and it's a bear to get the 3/8" hose on. What I still need to do is the two soft lines by the transmission and starter. I can't imagine getting 3/8" hose on down there.

Anyone use the 10mm hose from Belmetric for this (they have both braided and regular) ?
 
Joined
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I agree, it was a bear to get them on, especially when cold (done during December). The half mm difference is huge!

When looking at metric options in the US, I couldn't find any that were spec'd with a high enough pressure tolerance for the application. The working pressure for the Belmetric hose you suggest is 150psi, while most transmission hose is spec'd at 250psi and up. The one used is for 300psi, so at it gives me comfort there is a higher tolerance. However, if you or someone else finds a metric option with a proper spec, please share.
 
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I'll let those who are more knowledgeable take the lead on this, but it would also give me pause. The lower pressure and temperature (250F) make me question the tolerance. Keep in mind transmissions run hotter than engines, especially in traffic. I would think that hose is already pushing the upper limits on both.
 
Joined
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overlandtl, Remember that hose used for transmission oil needs to be not only rated for high pressure, but also for hot/ high temp oil service. When i searched for info on the Abbott/Continental rubber hose you used, i found out that it's only rated for a max fluid temp of 190 degrees, and a max pressure of 300 PSI. With only a max temp rating of 190 degrees that's not going to stand up to summer time temps for very long. Below is a link to where i found it's max temp rating.​


 
Joined
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Indiana
I used the Gates hose as well. The max temp rating is 302. I don't think using the Continental would be a good idea since the max temp is 190.
 
Joined
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Thanks @ZackR I wasn't able to find the Gates hose locally, at least nothing by the foot.

@Rifleman, you bring up a good point. The specs for the hose I used are actually an upper tolerance of 210F. I had referred to what now appears to be a typo'd version from Continental noting 210C / 410F. It appears that Continental offers a high temperature version and is available for sale by the foot here.

Looks like I'm going to have some needless work to do soon :(
 
Joined
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Thanks @ZackR I wasn't able to find the Gates hose locally, at least nothing by the foot.

@Rifleman, you bring up a good point. The specs for the hose I used are actually an upper tolerance of 210F. I had referred to what now appears to be a typo'd version from Continental noting 210C / 410F. It appears that Continental offers a high temperature version and is available for sale by the foot here.

Looks like I'm going to have some needless work to do soon :(
It's WAY BETTER that you found this out now, instead of after blowing a hose. Or even worse, if a hose blew oil all over your engine, or exhaust, that might even start a fire!!!
 
Joined
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Seattle, WA
@Rifleman, very good point! I was fortunate enough to have had this originally happen in the comfort of my garage. I'll end tearing apart and putting back together after I get some replacement hose.

@bencallaway I'll check it out as an option
 
Joined
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Sisters, OR
Call your local NAPA and I bet they have the Gates hose or will be able to get it within a day. Now that you've done it once replacing it won't be hard.

PS: The radiator doesn't need to be removed. Also if you haven't already its a good time to exchange the transmission fluid.
 
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Just a few days ago I noticed a trail of drips on my street leading from where I pulled out of my driveway. Crawled underneath and saw some suspicious wetness that I was hoping wasn't oil or coolant. Touched the most obvious area on the dampener bracket and it was slick, at least it's not coolant. Getting more on my finger it looked red, so I looked right above where the cooler line enters the rad. Sure enough there's a very small tear visible right where the nipple on the rad is. Time to swap the hoses out. Going to source some of that Gates hose.
 
Joined
Jul 21, 2015
Messages
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Location
Sisters, OR
Just a few days ago I noticed a trail of drips on my street leading from where I pulled out of my driveway. Crawled underneath and saw some suspicious wetness that I was hoping wasn't oil or coolant. Touched the most obvious area on the dampener bracket and it was slick, at least it's not coolant. Getting more on my finger it looked red, so I looked right above where the cooler line enters the rad. Sure enough there's a very small tear visible right where the nipple on the rad is. Time to swap the hoses out. Going to source some of that Gates hose.

It's a lot easier to make that repair in your driveway rather on the side of a dirt road :)
 
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Do the oem toyota clamps work well on the aftermarket hose? I would think the aftermarket hose would have a smaller O.D. than the oem

Thanks
 
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Feb 4, 2015
Messages
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Do the oem toyota clamps work well on the aftermarket hose? I would think the aftermarket hose would have a smaller O.D. than the oem

Thanks


Most of the aftermarket hose that you buy from you're local auto supply store (Pep Boys, Auto Zone and even Napa) will be "inch" or SAE in size. So to answer your question, the Toyota hose clamps may not work right.

When i need a replacement hose for my truck i go to a local auto supply house that only sells replacement parts for Japanese, and European cars. Since they only deal in metric replacement parts, they always have the correct size metric hose in stock.
 

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