Scored 2011 LC W/79K OMG CLEAN (2012 missing link) (1 Viewer)

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While under the hood I found some clips missing from front plastic cover.

Easy fix with OEM clips.
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Brake flush is one of those fluids I feel I'm tossing out the best fluid I'll ever have. I say this because in the 100 series years ago I found my ~13 year old factory brake fluid looked like new coming out. That we can't buy what comes imported in the vehicle in USA. The brake fluid the Toyota Dealership parts carries is made by same company, but formulated differently due to EPA law.

Regardless I flush then bleed brakes if more than seven years in Colorado. Once factory fluid has been replaced, I flush every 2 - 3 years.

You'll see FSM states keep level above minimum line. Well that best for bleeding, but not when flushing from rear. But best in all cases to keep above min line when doing fronts. When I flush, I'll take reservoir very low, to near bottom as I can. Sure if I drain to much off I'll get air in system, which I'd rather not. But it's not that big a deal to bleed out.

I started flushing the way I show here years ago, before I had Mini VCI to tap into tech stream. It's work for without tech stream countless times just fine.

First is to prep brake pedal with a helper spring loaded pole (shower curtain rod) I use when nobody around to help out, to hold it down. I use the seat motor to press on my pole which rides on the brake pedal. In the 200 it necessary to active IG switch before depressing brake pedal or engine will start. If engine is run I can't hear the brake booster pump running, which I like to be able too.

Stock photo helper pole in a 100 series.
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Once booster pump is activate it will stop running once accumulator full and pressure at factory preset point as read by pressure sensor.
I then remove bleeders rubber cap, and use a six side 10mm socket with small breaker bar (3/8" or 1/4" drive) to break the DS (LH) rear bleeder plug loose. Why left rear; it's close and rears don't require pumping the brake pedal, just hold pedal down. Once bleeder is broken loose I attach my clear hose running to a catch jar I made up years ago. The hose passes through lid and on inside of lid I pressed on a second large hose to act as a keep. This keeps hose from coming out of the jar.

Now I open bleeder (turn clockwise) with a 10mm flare nut or open end wrench, with my clear hose attached. The fluid will flow and pump runs as long as I have bleeder opened. I draw off about 1 qt, stopping after ~ 30 seconds to check level at reservoir. As level in reservoirs nears the bottom, I open bleeder for shorter duration, just a few seconds. I keep going up front and checking level in the reservoir while bleeder is closed. Also FSM does not like us running pump motor much more than 100 seconds. I'm not so concerned with running the booster motor, but I don't want to run pump while dry. In any case I run pump short bust and keep checking reservoir level each time I close bleeder. Pump will stop as long as air has not gotten in system once bleeders is closed any pressure builds, as sensor reads pressure at it's factory preset point. If for some reason booster pump motor didn't stop, like a leak or air in system. I'd release brake pedal and or turn IG off or disconnect battery. All will stop booster pump.
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Some will ask "why not just suck out brake fluid from reservoir". Well it's very difficult to get a line in reservoir and I can only get out about half of fluid. Some use a pressurizing device, that fine I suppose (I've no such tool). I just use the booster pump to do work for me, works just fine.

I draw fluid down to near empty in reservoir, very careful to keep 3/8" or more of fluid in bottom.
This one was really low:cautious: about 3/8" from bottom, hard to see in pic.
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Now with bleeder closed I release the pole from brake pedal, turn IG off and pump brake pedal until accumulator empties into reservoir. I know when it's empty as pedal pressure drops. This raise level in reservoir with old fluid from accumulator.
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Now I'll double or more amount of fluid in reservoir by adding in my new brake fluid. This gives me ~50/50 mix of old with new.
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Now I set up my brake pedal helper pole with key on again. This activates booster pump motor drawing in my 50/50 mix of old and new fluid into accumulator. I then go back to bleeder jar and bleed DS rear bleeder again and draw off just a little, lowering level in reservoir again.

I keep repeating draw down level into a empty jar, evacuating accumulator, adding fresh fluid until fluid runs clear. This take ~5 times to get a mix of about 97% fresh brake fluid.
 
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By emptying catch jar between each repeat of evacutating acuumlator, adding in fresh and drawing off mix I can watch change in color.

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Gets clearer with each repeat.
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Color/clarity after ~5 repeats of flush accumulator, looks like new brake fluid I'm adding in.
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Once I'm satisfied brake fluid is as clear as I can reasonably get it, I evacutate the acuumlator again emptying it into reservoir. Now I fill up the reservoir with fresh fluid to max line. Then as I activate booster pump it daws down fluid about 10mm staying well above minimum line. From now on I'll keep level above minimum line best I can. I'll evacuate accumulator into reservoir before adding fluid each time hereafter.
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Now I've flushed the reservoir, accumulator and DS (left) rear brake hard and flexible lines. I torque DS rear bleeder plug to 8ft-lbf and move to PS rear bleeder to flush its line. At PS bleeder I'll bleed off 3 to 5 oz, empty my jar often and bleed a little more until I see clear fluid passing through tube into catch jar. Then I'll torque PS bleeder, evacuate accumulator, top off reservoir and move to DS or PS front bleeder one at a time to flush their lines.

Fronts flushing is a little more difficult as booster will no longer do the work, a helper is needed to pump pedal with key on (as always). With key on, pumping brake pedal 20 times first time, than 3 to 5 times holding brake pedal down on last stroke as I opened bleeder plug. It's important that bleeder plug only be opened when pressure is being applied to brake pedal. Bleeder must be closed (sung down) before brake pedal is released. Helper pumps pedal 3 -5 times "with key on" so that booster pump keeps system pressurized. As helper holds pedal down and I open bleeder, only getting ~1 oz as pedal goes to floor. I'll sung down bleeder before pedal pressure is released by helper, to insure air is not suck back into bleeder/caliper. It takes 5 to 8 cycles of pumping and bleeding off, before fluid runs clear signaling that front brake line is flushed. I then move to other front brake line.

One other thing makes flushing front a little more difficult is getting a wrench on bleeder plug with my clear bleeder line attached. Stuff like wheel and caliper limit my wrench's movement. I use 10mm socket to break loose bleeder plug, then I attach my bleeder clear hose and jar as I did in rear. I then just deal with limited wrench movement best I can (open end 10mm wrench works well or a short handle 10mm flare nut wrench or curved handle would work even better). 100 or 200 series it's about the same in this lack of room, which Toyota give us longer bleeder plug in front to help us out here.

There is two more area with some old fluid to flush:

One being calipers which is rarely done. To do this at minimum wheel must be off to get at brake pads, removing caliper makes easier. I've done this caliper bleed once on a 100 series, and I had calipers off disk. I spread out pad pushing in piston of caliper while bleeder plug open. This pushes old fluid out of caliper. The difficulty is compounded as care must be taken to not damage pads. So if metal tab of pad can't be grab to press into piston with say channel locks, I use wood between pads to spread then apart. The temptation is to use a screwdriver or mini crowbar on pads. Bad Idea to pry on pad material with metal, as it may chip.

The second is activating the valves of ABS to move fluid through, this is so easy. By now I have a good brake pedal feel and all bleeder torqued to 8ft-lbf. I drive to dirt road and stomp on brakes at ~35 MPH 5 to 7 times activating ABS, if the motion hasn't made me to wossy, I'm may do this 10 times. With 200 series I suppose we could just activate crawl control in slow, Wow ABS sounds crazy as they pulses brakes on and off. FSM has a procedure for bleeding air from master solenoid/ABS, that involves use of Tech stream. I'm not going to cover that here. Someone who has ability to hook up tech stream will have access to FSM procedure. But, I may post that up later. If you've been careful to not get air in system, I see no reason to use tech stream. Even a little air in beginning of flush hasn't been and issue for me.

Once done activating ABS, I do a mini flush and bleed. Now I'll start at front RH and bleed off a few oz, then LH front, RH rear bleeding of 3 t 5 oz and finally LH rear for another 3 to 5 oz. Again always topping fluid in reservoir as I draw off, checking level once acuumlator evacuted. Here I'm closely watching for air bubbles. If I haven't run reservoir empty sucking in air in, I don't see any. But by bleeding I'm making sure I've no air and drawing off a little more old fluid that ABS valve released.

More to follow:;)
 
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Testing brake system:

Does brake pedal feel firm, that’s first test.

We activated ABS hearing and feeling ABS pulse the brakes on and off, so that's working.

No alarm with key on, so that's good. Don't freak out if CEL or ABS light on. If you set off a DTC it may need clearing, which happens often while flushing. I use my BT OBDII or mini VCI cable to clear DTC. In the past, I would to drive to a parts store where I’d get them to hook then I push the clear button, they aren’t allowed to.

Next we test accumulator pump function and for air in system. This is done by evacuating accumulator (key off pump pedal 20 time or until you feel pedal release plus 3 or more pumps of pedal) repeating (turning on key running pump until it stops, then key off and pump pedal evacuating accumulator) this 5 times,. At this point accumulator has been evacuated, so top fluid to max line. If fluid above max line, simply draw some off from a rear bleeder as we did to start the flushing.

We measure how far brake fluid drops in reservoir drops form evacuated accumulator until pump booster stop running after key turned on. We're looking for about 10mm drop in the 200 series. Factory made this easy to see with a line on reservoir about 10mm below the max line.
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Also time how long pump runs to fill accumulator until it stops. We're looking for less than 18 seconds. If it takes more than 18 seconds (30 to 40 seconds in the 100 series) repeat evacuating accumulator cycle 5 times (this is new for the 200 series, 100 series did have this multiple recommendation but can't hurt) and recheck.
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Two most common reasons for running over time limit is air in system or a leak.

The only way I can tell if a bleeder is weeping (leaking) is de-grease the area first. First I use compressed blowing out fluid from bleeder orifice (can of keyboard compressed air cleaner works). Then I cap the bleeder with a good rubber cap. Now I spray area with de-greaser, brake fluid cleaner works or any de-grease such as dish soap then rinsing off with water. Once de-greased and dry, I turn on key and pumping brake pedal a few times pressing hard. I then inspect each bleeder for leaks. Naturally I’m looking around caliper and brake lines also

Often times a bleeder will leak just a tiny bit. I just snug leaky bleeder a tiny bit pass the 8ft-lbf torque 1 ft-lbf at a time. If by ~11ft-lbf of torque it has not stop weeping, I replace bleeder with new OEM.

If no leak is found I re-bleed system, it may have some air in it which will increase time it takes to reach factory required system pressure

Rubber Bleeder caps is a big deal and must be on bleeder plug and in good condition.

On this 2011 all rubber bleeder caps were in place and in good condition (no cracking and rubber pliable). So no recondition or replacements needed. But if I find any stiffness, cracking or missing caps I replace. Plugs with bad or without caps get water in them. The moisture gets into cavity between plug and where it seats in caliper. This causes problems with rust freezing in plug, rust plugging bleeder orifice and can damage caliper leading to very expensive repairs.

Caps should be inspected annually. Even if brakes shop serviced, check these caps when they’re done. I find caps bad or missing so often just after a Dealership or other shop has service.

Note: During flushing or bleeding if I find any bleeder to corroded looking or plugged, I pull and recondition or replace.
 
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I also checked brake pads, rotors discs and E-brakes which all looked good. Generally we just look pad through window in caliper with wheel off to see thickness of pads. But I've had some issue in the past with back sides of rotors, pads and E-brake shoes & mechanism being damage. These aren't visible without removing caliper and rear rotors/drum. So I go ahead and pull rears apart to get better view. Factory give us two 8 X 1.25mm bolt holes in face of rotor drum, which are very helpful for pressing off rotors from hub. It's very important to release E-brake handle, and loosen shoes by adjusting in e-brake adjuster. I've seen where a shop did not release the shoes grip on drum before pressing off drum off hub. They stretched the clips that retain the shoes so far that they pulled them through backing plate. See post #27.

These drums were not stuck on so I just pulled off by hand. To assure they'd not freeze on in future I clean and grease hubs.

Rear pad had more than 4mm on thinnest pad. Limit is 1mm at which time the brake pad warning squeal starts sounding off. I also get a good look at dust boots of slide pins. They need to be in good condition and seated properly or water & dirt gets into slide pins area freezing them up.
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Back of rotors looked fine. I use my wire brush to clean surface that mates to hub ensuring a good flat contact. I make sure to degrease disk before and after I put back on. Brake cleaner works well, I've a gallon of this stuff so I just use it. Rotors were near factory new thickness at 17.66mm (new 18mm, minimum 16mm).
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E-brake pads looked good with 3.75mm at thinnest point, as did all mechanism within.
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After I clean up axle hub with wire brush, I grease them to prevent rust and insure easy remove for years to come. I degrease the lugs if I get any grease on them.
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I added some red threadlocker to caliper bolt before torquing to 70ft-lbf.
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Last is adjusting E-brake pads by tightening then backing off 8 clicks. The adjuster is clocked slightly to rear rather than at 6 O'clock position as we've seen in past models. I then replace E-brake adjuster rubber plug and torque on wheel lugs to 97ft-lbf.
 
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I've covered much (not all) I've mechanicals I've worked on that inspection or base-line dictate I do under the hood and in drivetrain, as part of the restore procedure I do!

Sonar sensor for parking assist

I also found the LH front sonar for parking assist was very sensitive. I've never dealt with sonar or had in any of my vehicles before. In speaking with @Ali FJ80 who had similar issue, I took his approach and replace the sensor. I didn't do a lot of testing, so kind of a leap of faith just throwing a rather price little sonar sensor at it.

It was fairly easy to replace by unfastening inner front fender lower 3 screws outer and one lower skirt screws, then unclipping bumper from it and front tip of fender. I was then able to open area just enough to reach in too unclip sensor from bumper skin. Once I had it pulled from bumper, I then clipped wire housing from sensor. Wire housing tend to be tight from dust filling the housing, making them a bit hard to pull apart. A little electric contact sprayed cleaner between housing and sensor can really help out here. But with this one I was able to just work off without spraying. Then just assemble in reverse order.

With new sensor in hand I could see how it's fasteners work to hold it in and release them.
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Once unclipped from bumper, I could see how wire housing is fasten in as it just dangles behind bumper skin.
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I simply reassembled in reverse order
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Seems to have helped, as now it's not going off all the time at slightest sensing just the front LH. I now see LH & RH warning and only when called for. Although very sensitive, nice we've a switch to shut off.

I may see if we can reduce sensitivity within tech stream but all and all seems to spec now.
 
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Paul, you can adjust the sensitivity from the dash, no tech stream needed. It in the menus somewhere. I lowered mine after the new sensors also.
 
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@Ali FJ80 When you look at my picture of the LH front sensor above, does the orientation (clocking) look the same as yours with wire housing pointed down?

I just realize, I never pulled the retainer (hole in bumper) to make sure its was keyed properly in bumper notch.:hmm:

The FSM show different orientation, with keyhole in bumper at bottom right side.
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Looks like I'm going back in the bumper. I've some indications PO had this bumper off for some reason. I'll bet they oriented wrong.

Could be I'll have a good sonar sensor for sale, CHEAP. :bang:

I see we've only one PN # for both front retainers & sensores. So clocking would be the same for both sides if keyhole same position.

With my LH pointing down I'm guessing the sensor has a oval shape signal it sends and receives. That now it's picking up the ground as a side object.:hmm:
 
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Helped a local mud member out with a front drive shaft install on a heavily built 98 LC w/SC yesterday. So didn't get back to my 2011 sonar issue until today.

Sure enough, by pulling the sonar retainer I found both sides not oriented (keyed) correctly. Once oriented with keyhole of hole(s) in bumper, the sonar sensor snap in with wire housing pointed to the outside on each side just like yours @Ali FJ80.

I put old sonar sensor back in, and just sitting in garage appears to work perfectly (not overly sensitive) now. I'll do a road test tomorrow to see how it behaves coming to a stop and pulling into sloped driveway, which was setting PA off excessively before re orientating.

Edited: Road tested and all good.:)

DS keyhole on top.
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DS protrusion of retainer up to match keyhole, orientation is wire housing to outside.
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PS bumper keyhole is on bottom which then orients wire housing of sonar sensor to outside.
 
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Moving on around the exterior: I pulled, inspected and replaced the PS windshield side molding & clips. It appears the installer for PO chipped the paint (all to common) and did not replace molding or clips after damaging them.

Should not be a gap between molding and "A" pillar.
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First was to remove side molding. This is entirely new fastening system in the 200 series. No need to drill out rivets, but took some investigating to learn best way to release clips from molding. A video was posted showing how here along with FSM pages and discussion: Windshield moulding removal
Releasing clips of side molding starts ~6 min.

First thing is to tape off to protect body paint, then remove molding under hood starting with windshield wipers, side molding under hood and large molding under windshield that hoses washers.
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Then remove side molding. As it turned out my RH side molding was so poorly clipped I was able to just squeeze at clip point and pop off easily. If properly clipped and in good condition I doubt I could have removed so easily.
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Three of the four side clip where none reusable as they each had one of two clips broken off
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The molding has two clip retaining it in rain gutter also. It seems one (rear) retainer clip came loose. So installer glued down it appears with urethane. That's fine provided it's lined up and not blocking rain gutter under molding.

Glob of urethane was damming rain gutter.
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So I carefully cut out excesses with plastic chisel so to not damage paint, clearing dam.
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Working the chipped paint with molding out allowed greater access, so it was next.
I lightly grind out any surface rust when dealing with any chips. I use a hand held 30X microscope to see if rust goes under paint. I grind until all specs of rust are removed.
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I then painted with two part epoxy primer.
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Then follow up with a top coat of touch up paint over primer, and new retainer clips then installed new molding.
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New molding in with clips is holding tight against "A" pillar. Chip is de-rusted and painted for protection of body.
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I noticed something interesting while removing lower molding under windshield. What I found was leaves in and under the lower windshield molding. Also interesting is the cabin HVAC filter within the glove box opens into underside this molding. Once the lower molding is removed, a thin permanent filter is expose leading into glove box.

Odor in interior AHA

By removing this molding periodically to clean out trap debris we can eliminate this one odor ;)

Permanent filter is expose.
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Only one 10mm bolt holds on the dipstick guide tube. It just below top end of dipstick tube where dipstick feed in.View attachment 1798790
I use a piece of tape to help wedge the bolt head into my socket.View attachment 1798789
Interesting the old O-ring (factory installed) was knicked. Although my first on a 5.7L, i've done many on the 4.7L and this was first time I've seen a damaged O-ring. They must have moved the cam tower assembly guy at the Toyota engine plant to dipSticks!
View attachment 1798793

Took me longer to post this than replace the O-ring.

Paul,

I Follow you on the 100s and thought I'd see what you're up to. Nice looking 200.

I have the leak on my o ring from the dip stick and was going to replace at next oil change, but is this something that can be done with oil in the case? I'm asking about the 4.7L engines as I have a 2006. Sorry to ask on the 200 forum guys.
 

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