Refreshing or Updating the 62 brakes?

HMP

Joined
Aug 5, 2022
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Location
Winston Salem, NC
So Im reading around on here a bit...ok, a lot (it's overwhelming, honestly), and Im seeing stuff about refreshing the brakes and some are using 2nd gen 4Runner front calipers etc...so what's the best route?

Are the 2nd gen 4R calipers better or lighter? Is it worth it to source a set from the junkyard? Or just try to rebuild what I got stock?

Im totally new to all of this, and I just want this car mechanically sound (and it's running fine now, though there's a small oil leak) and able to stop me well.

What things should I be looking to refresh on the braking system? Stainless lines or are the stock rubber units fine? Any pad (of reputable brand) sufficient? What fluid?

GUIDE ME.
And, as always, thanks in advance, appreciate yall helping on this new journey.
 
Joined
Jul 11, 2022
Messages
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Location
ABQ, NM
In my limited reading from the pros, if you are swapping part of it. Swap it all. So if 2nd gen 4Runner calipers, then also the MC and booster.

The pros can correct me hopefully
 
Joined
Mar 3, 2020
Messages
106
Location
Orange, California
I did the 2nd gen 4R calipers, along with a dual diaphragm brake booster and a disk/drum master cylinder.
It made a noticeable difference, if your brakes are do for a refresh ( pads, maybe rotors ) I’d suggest you do the upgrade.

Don’t buy a used caliper from a junkyard, don’t know the history of the part you’re getting.
Your brakes are kind of important, on or off road. Buy a known quality brake or steering component.
It might be a bit more $$ when you purchase, but you can’t put a price on safety.
 

Gretsch

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diesellibrarian

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Where the prairies meet the Rockies
If the stock brakes were good enough for the Toyota engineers, they're good enough for me.

I ordered some remanufactured calipers from NAPA, and put in some decent quality pads. They work fine.

If your pedal is spongy, look at the rear brakes. If the rear shoes are worn or if the self-adjusting mechanism is seized, you won't get good pedal feel and you won't get good braking performance. There's another component in the system called the LSPV (Load Sensing Proportioning Valve) that is designed to compensate for heavy loads when braking. The LSPV is mounted to the undercarriage above and in front of the rear axle. These can gum up over time as well.

I think steel braided brake lines are overkill for most applications. New TOYOTA rubber lines are the way to go IMHO. Replacing soft brake lines is an important part of baselining your Cruiser.

Run DOT3 fluid.

If you haven't found a copy of the FSM yet, look at this thread. The first thirty or so pages of the manual will tell you all about the maintenance operations you are about to undertake, fluid specs, etc.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jan 17, 2005
Messages
6,257
Location
Southern Colorado
I replaced my front calipers with $29 Rock Auto cheapos. The old calipers had rotted dust boots and the pistons were sticking. The truck stops straight now. I also replaced the rubber lines with OEM, since they were rotted.

If you don't have rusty lines or a lot of issues, I think a stock refresh with new pads and calipers, and new shoes in the back is what you need. I won't say the '62 has excellent brakes, but they are adequate.
 

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