Installers of Aussie lockers in Philadelphia are

stock

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Hi All,

I'm going to get an Aussie for the rear of my 1991 80, my first modification, and am trying to decide if I'm doing it myself or farming it out. Any installers in the area you recommend? I'm going to get some quotes and decide. I'm in Philadelphia.
 

DirtScaresMe

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Not to hijack your thread, I was just planning on making my own but thought this might fit well in here:

Are there any real reasons for using a "full" locker (factory, arb, etc) vs a good lunchbox locker like the Aussie in the rear? From my reading it seems like the Aussie locker:

  • Won't let a rear wheel sit in the dirt while the other spins in the air.
  • Is WAY cheaper/easier to install than an air locker and buying old factory stuff is also pretty expensive.
  • Seems pretty reliable; I haven't seen much regarding failures.
The front is a different bag of potatoes but it really seems like for those of us without factory lockers for only a few hundred bucks later we've got our factory central dif lock then an aussie on the back. Seems really good.
 
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To the OP: what is your mechanical ability? Aussie install is not difficult and the instructions are good. If you have :banana::banana: worth, it should be pretty easy. If you have :banana:, then look up your local club and see if someone will supervise/guide you.
 
Joined
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Not to hijack your thread, I was just planning on making my own but thought this might fit well in here:

Are there any real reasons for using a "full" locker (factory, arb, etc) vs a good lunchbox locker like the Aussie in the rear? From my reading it seems like the Aussie locker:

  • Won't let a rear wheel sit in the dirt while the other spins in the air.
  • Is WAY cheaper/easier to install than an air locker and buying old factory stuff is also pretty expensive.
  • Seems pretty reliable; I haven't seen much regarding failures.
The front is a different bag of potatoes but it really seems like for those of us without factory lockers for only a few hundred bucks later we've got our factory central dif lock then an aussie on the back. Seems really good.
Some people don't like their truck making funny noises or chirping tires pulling out of a parking spot. Can also be pretty finnicky on an icey road. I would not let me wife or daughter drive my lunchbox-locked trucks in the snow, but I didn't have a problem with driving it myself.
 

stock

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To the OP: what is your mechanical ability? Aussie install is not difficult and the instructions are good. If you have :banana::banana: worth, it should be pretty easy. If you have :banana:, then look up your local club and see if someone will supervise/guide you.
I read the install manual, I could do it, but sometimes it's easier to pay someone. I'm working on rebuilding my 1950 Dodge B2 Pickup and pulling the engine on my 1961 Chris Craft (cracked block). It's more of a time thing. I'm going to make my own sliders, that's fun for me, putting in a locker, not so much. And if it's so easy, which it is, how much is a garage going to charge me for 2 hours of work?
 

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@DirtScaresMe That's the exact conclusion I came to and decided on the Aussie's.

I also want to experiment with it. It's going to go in my 1991 fj80, but I have a 69 and 73 fj40 that will get upgrades down the line.
 
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To the OP: what is your mechanical ability? Aussie install is not difficult and the instructions are good. If you have :banana::banana: worth, it should be pretty easy. If you have :banana:, then look up your local club and see if someone will supervise/guide you.
Or, if your wife is anything like mine, just have her watch you do the job. She won't help you get it right the first time, but she will tell you everything you did wrong after the fact. :grinpimp:
 

DirtScaresMe

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Some people don't like their truck making funny noises or chirping tires pulling out of a parking spot. Can also be pretty finnicky on an icey road. I would not let me wife or daughter drive my lunchbox-locked trucks in the snow, but I didn't have a problem with driving it myself.
I drive on ice and snow constantly; I've used my central dif a lot. Does the back end squirrel around more? What are the handling characteristics on ice with a aussie locker?
 
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I think the snow and ice thing is a bit overblown, on these trucks we have automatic transmissions (mostly) and a longer wheelbase. All of these factors combined with decent tires will help reduce the negative effects of a rear auto locker in snow. In addition when its snowy or icy most (normal) people tend to drive slower and more gently.

If we were talking about a jeep wrangler (or FJ40) with a manual transmission in 2wd mode that would be a whole different story. I drive in snow all of the time (still snow on the ground at my house leftover from thanksgiving) and will be installing an aussie locker this summer.

Lets hear from some folks with actual snow/ice experience on a auto trans 80 series with decent tires...
 

Pin_Head

 
 
 
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I drive on ice and snow constantly; I've used my central dif a lot. Does the back end squirrel around more? What are the handling characteristics on ice with a aussie locker?
Autolockers switch drive sides when you go from drive to coast and coast to drive. Sometimes they switch violently with a pop, which causes a wheel to lose traction and slide. If you avoid getting on and off the gas pedal, you won't have as much of a problem. Studded tires or chains will minimize the problems and increase traction too.
 
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I drive on ice and snow constantly; I've used my central dif a lot. Does the back end squirrel around more? What are the handling characteristics on ice with a aussie locker?
Yeah, it's just a lot easier to break traction and get the back end to step out. Usually it's predictable enough (have to be very gentle on the throttle) but sometimes the circumstances around you require you to be more abrupt and that can get scary. Also driving on an off-camber surface (like a crowned road surface), will cause the back end to want to slide downhill. My autolocker experience is in a mini-truck (which has no weight in the back) and a 60, which is a little lighter than an 80. The 60 was noticeably tamer in the snow than the pickup. I imagine an 80 would be a little better too.
 

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Well, somehow my ask for installers became a conversation about driving on ice:cautious:.

Anyway, I happened to be out by Main Line Overland in West Chester PA today and decided to stop in and check them out. Man, first class operation there. I asked him about install of Aussie and he gave me a number to install it plus the actual locker. Then he said ARB install labor would be $200 more and the unit would be $600 more, BUT ARB was giving a free compressor special. Which I've seen them doing. Shoot, I just went for it. Stepping up to an ARB this week. Can't wait to try them out. Next are sliders!:)

Main Line Overland
 
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