Firewood?

flintknapper

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One last question before I go after the root ball end. Is there a handy way to ensure I'm aiming for the same point when plunge cutting from each side? Or just spitball it?
Yes, if you aren't very good 'eyeballing it'....then make your plunge cut starting about 1/2 way up from the bottom of the trunk. Keep your bar buried (let the saw do the work) and saw downward until you come out the bottom on one side. Then take a piece of string (or small rope, small enough to fit in the saw kerf) and wrap it around the log. You'll be able to see if the rope/string is fairly straight and where the two ends overlap...make a mark. Use that to line up your second plunge cut.

Bore in and cut down that side until you come out the bottom. Then move to the top. Once you've made enough cut to get a wedge in your saw kerf...you can continue cutting down toward your bottom cuts. Keep a couple of wedges in your top cut to prevent the trunk from closing up on your bar. Be ready to move back when the two sides separate. The root ball shouldn't fall back into the hole doesn't look like, but do expect some movement.

Once the entire trunk is on the ground (no air underneath it) you can switch back to cutting solely from the top down and again use your wedges to keep your kerf open (avoid pinching your bar).

Bet you are tired of working on it by now? Why can't these things happen in October when the weather is nice in Kansas.

NOTE: Remember to roll your tip into the log and DON'T stand directly behind the saw until you've got it started well and begin your push straight in. Bore/Plunge cuts are more often horizontal (felling trees) where you are naturally more out of the way. So be careful not to get any kickback.

Edit: Sent you a PM, an easier way to line up your plunge cuts, but not for the inexperienced, so not posted here.
 
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Somewhere between Manhattan and Lawrence.
Bet you are tired of working on it by now? Why can't these things happen in October when the weather is nice in Kansas.
Not really tired of it. I kind of enjoy it. It relaxes me a bit. If i had to do it for a living or on a time constraint that would be a different story. As it is, the tree is literally 10 meters from my drive way so I'll spend two or three hours at a time working on it when I feel like it. When I've worked up enough sweat to justify a cold beverage I stop. When it's too hot I don't work. When it's raining I don't work. When there's a ball game on I don't work. Sure, my wife would like the process to move faster but I remind her that we're saving a fair chunk of change by not paying someone else to do this for us.

Anyway. Thanks for your help. I'll be sure to get a pic of the cross section when I get through 'er.
 

flintknapper

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Might want to wait until late September to finish up. It's been beastly hot here. Probably no better up there.

Looking forward to updates though.
 

flintknapper

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At a standstill for the last week or so. I cut what I could but my 20" bar wasn't long enough to get through from both sides so I ordered a 24" bar/chain. Should be here this week.
^^^^

There ya go!

Less leaning/bending over too when cutting smaller stuff on the ground.

Keep that chain sharp and rpm up....I'm sure you know. Your saw should pull it fine...but you are in dried up wood now, so more taxing on the saw.

Good job, you've got it on the run.
 

flintknapper

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GOOD JOB!

Now that the trunk is fully on the ground....you can just cut from the top down and use a wedge to keep your kerf open, so the bar doesn't pinch. That trunk is larger than I had imagined.

You whooped it's butt!
 

flintknapper

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Don't tell my wife (she'd like me to get the tree out of there as soon as possible) but I have an alaskan chainsaw mill and I'm tempted to cut a few slabs. It cuts only 20" wide so I'd have to trim the trunk to make it work but I'm contemplating.
The 460 will do it.....but the saw might hate you for it.

If you don't already have ripping chain for it...consider that .

I'm in your Wife's camp. The tree has been enough work already....get it out of there.

The great thing about Wive's.... is they tend to talk us out of all those 'Man with a Chainsaw' things we probably don't need to be doing. ;)

If you had access to a Band type mill....it would be a nice log to quarter saw.
 

NMC_EXP

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You may have seen this if it's not already in this thread. But if not......


True Cost to Heat with Wood

First year costs:

2 stoves and installation $1385.
Removal of hot water baseboard and boiler $238.
Search for reputable wood dealer N/A $76.
Chain saw $210.
Ax, wedges, maul, cant hook, etc. $119.
Old truck (junk after 1st load) $595.
Newer truck $8645.
Tire chains $88.
Replace truck's rear window (twice) $310.
Fine for cutting wrong trees $500.
5-acre woodlot $4995.
Splitting machine $950.
14 cases of beer $126.
6 fifths ginger brandy $38.
Fine for littering $250.
Towing charge (brook to road) $50.
Gas, oil, files, Band-aids $97.
Doctor's fee (sawdust in eye) $45.
Medical cost for broken toe (dropped log) $128.
Safety shoes $35.
Attempt to fix burned hole in carpet $76.
New living room carpet $699.
Paint living room $110.
Taxes on woodlot $44.
Woodlot boundary dispute settlement $465.
Roof repair after chimney fire $840.
Fine for assaulting fireman $50.
Extension ladder $55.
Chimney brush $22.
Medical fee for broken leg (fell off roof) $478.
Chimney cleaning service $90.
Replace coffee table (chopped up and burned while too drunk to bring firewood up from cellar) $79.
Divorce settlement $14,500.
EXPENSES $36,388

Sale of hot water boiler system $125.
Fuel oil savings $376.
CREDITS $501.

NET COST OF FIRST YEAR WOOD BURNING OPERATION; $35,887.
 

flintknapper

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Oak - white oak I believe. I've trimmed up the distal end of the tree pretty well so the trunk on the ground is ~15'.

add- I think it's actually a Bur oak. Sub species of white oaks here in Kansas.

Agree it's very likely a Bur Oak given your location. A common native species for Eastern Kansas. An easy way to tell is by the Acorn it produces....rather than the leaves, which pretty much look like White Oak leaves.

Bur Oak ac.jpg


buroakfruit3.jpg
 

rkymtnflyfisher

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Put the Stihl MS 291 to work on Saturday, I only managed to load up a little more than a half a truck worth of wood. Mostly lodgepole with one fir that I left on the ground last time I was cutting.

20190818_144014.jpg
 

e9999

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talking about firewood, I've always gone on the assumption that conifer wood like pine etc is not that good to use in fireplaces because of more deposits in the flue. Meaning I try not to use it. Is there indeed something to that effect or am I mistakenly missing out?
 

flintknapper

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talking about firewood, I've always gone on the assumption that conifer wood like pine etc is not that good to use in fireplaces because of more deposits in the flue. Meaning I try not to use it. Is there indeed something to that effect or am I mistakenly missing out?
No...you are correct about deposits....but in the case of Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) it is almost always cut as standing dead wood. It splits easily, leaves minimal resin and very little ash. It is generally thin barked and most wood collected will have the bark already sloughing off (if not gone).

Perfect wood if you didn't collect firewood BEFORE it gets cold....because it's easy to work with and will be around the 20% moisture content (standing dead wood) so will burn well right away.

And ALL woods produce Creosote by virtue of the smoke they produce. This is what can be a hazard in a chimney/flue if the buildup becomes too great. It is chiefly the product of wet or unseasoned woods however (low temperature fire). Pine's just happen to have more resin/sap than most other trees....so that doesn't help either.
 
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flintknapper

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About half of it is already split and stacked!
Good Man! You are ahead of me. I have a big pile of Seasoned Red Oak I need to split. But I usually wait until late October to do it...when we have cooler weather. It doesn't get cold here until mid December anyway.

Plus...the older I get, the more excuses I make for putting it off. I don't need it for heating, I just like having a fire in the fireplace.

If I need heat, the thermostat on the wall is just a few steps away. I've always cut and split my own wood...though it would be MUCH easier to just buy it. I guess as long as I am able...I will continue to do so.

But when I think about how many times you have to 'handle' firewood.....it does make you wonder if its worth it.

I cut wood from my own property each year....usually in late February...then let it season over the summer.

The scenario (for me) goes something like this:

1. Select a tree (or trees) to cut.
2. Drop tree(s).
3. Cut all the limbs and the top out of the tree(s) for smaller 'round wood'.
4. Buck the trunk and larger limbs into 'rounds' that can be split.
5. Load on trailer take wood up to my shop area.
6. Unload wood and stack near shop to season over the summer.
7. Split wood and re-stack it near shop area.
8. Load portion of the wood on trailer and transport to house.
9. Unload wood and stack near side of house.
10. As needed....get armloads of wood and stack near fireplace.
11. Fill fireplace with wood and ignite.
12. Clean fireplace of ashes.
13. Repeat steps 8-12 as required.

Alternately:
1. Walk over to thermostat...adjust to preferred temperature.
2. Write easily affordable check to electric company.

Considerations:
1. Flint is now 65 yrs. old.

Pros:
1. Gathering wood provides lots of exercise.

Cons:
1. Gathering wood is lots of exercise.
 
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