Electrical Help

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Joined
Jun 15, 2017
Threads
11
Messages
169
Location
Jemez Mtns, New Mexico
The dreaded question... Can you recommend anyone in the area who is a wiz with and not too crazy expensive to fix electrical issues? I changed the directional lights on my 40 to something more "original" and can't get them to work. Nor could my husband. Or my father. The wiring harness map for a '67, which I found on-line is all wrong... the previous owner did lots of modifications to the vehicle, including replacing the tail-lights with LED's (headlamps are not LED)... I'm told that could be part of the issue. At this point, I'm ready to rip it all out and start over. Any suggestions would be appreciated! Cheryl
 
Number one, check connections and grounds.

Number two, in the past working on old cars that someone else had modified, I personally think it’s easier to start fresh, so if a harness is available, I would recommend doing that.
 
Number one, check connections and grounds.

Number two, in the past working on old cars that someone else had modified, I personally think it’s easier to start fresh, so if a harness is available, I would recommend doing that.[/QUOT


No luck with number one; leaning more and more to number 2. Thanks!
 
You said LED turn signals. Are you using an LED flasher with them? The OEM flasher won't work with LED.
 
You said LED turn signals. Are you using an LED flasher with them? The OEM flasher won't work with LED.

That’s good to know, I just thought it would cause a rapid flashing
 
That’s good to know, I just thought it would cause a rapid flashing
It won't let them flash at all as I recall. Not enough resistance though the bulbs to trigger the flasher.
 
The dreaded question... Can you recommend anyone in the area who is a wiz with and not too crazy expensive to fix electrical issues? I changed the directional lights on my 40 to something more "original" and can't get them to work. Nor could my husband. Or my father. The wiring harness map for a '67, which I found on-line is all wrong... the previous owner did lots of modifications to the vehicle, including replacing the tail-lights with LED's (headlamps are not LED)... I'm told that could be part of the issue. At this point, I'm ready to rip it all out and start over. Any suggestions would be appreciated! Cheryl
If you can stand not having the vehicle for a while and bringing it to the South Valley, my dad could probably help you out. He's a retired Toyota mechanic but he's crotchety and works very slowly. He also doesn't charge much.
 
I'm just throwing this out there, is it THAT much work work to simply tear out the existing wiring harness and install a Painless kit like Pappy installed on his 40? Maybe some other vendor has a similar wiring kit, I dunno. Just wandering about the time/cost of the Painless kit vs hours of head scratching and repairing an old harness that someone mucked with for years.
 
... is it THAT much work work to simply tear out the existing wiring harness and install a Painless kit like Pappy installed on his 40?

My harness was actually a Centech. I would use it again.
 
I'm just throwing this out there, is it THAT much work work to simply tear out the existing wiring harness and install a Painless kit like Pappy installed on his 40? Maybe some other vendor has a similar wiring kit, I dunno. Just wandering about the time/cost of the Painless kit vs hours of head scratching and repairing an old harness that someone mucked with for years.

I really think this is the best ideas little more cost at first, bt could save a lot of problems in the long run
 
If you decide to go this route talk to me. BTDT. The aftermarket harnesses are NOT for Toyotas. The one I had was actually for wiring a Chevy hotrod, and I think most of them are. In spite of their name, there is nothing "painless" about the project. But, it's really the best way to go. Toyota has some hinky ways of doing things, so you just need to know that. One example is the headlights are wired backwards from domestic vehicles, and will be backwards from what the harness expects. Not a big deal, but little things like that you need to know. Same goes for wiring up LEDs.
 
If you can stand not having the vehicle for a while and bringing it to the South Valley, my dad could probably help you out. He's a retired Toyota mechanic but he's crotchety and works very slowly. He also doesn't charge much.

Well, this one will get his crankiness going... did my dad, for sure! But hey, I'm game if he is!! Problem is, it looks like a Toyota, but sadly it's not under the hood anymore. I bought it because the body is so clean and hoped to swap the engine back but ended up liking the extra power on the mountain roads. I almost feel dirty saying that... Almost.
 
If you decide to go this route talk to me. BTDT. The aftermarket harnesses are NOT for Toyotas. The one I had was actually for wiring a Chevy hotrod, and I think most of them are. In spite of their name, there is nothing "painless" about the project. But, it's really the best way to go. Toyota has some hinky ways of doing things, so you just need to know that. One example is the headlights are wired backwards from domestic vehicles, and will be backwards from what the harness expects. Not a big deal, but little things like that you need to know. Same goes for wiring up LEDs.

Well, we may need to talk for sure@ It's actually a Chevy hotrod under the hood... :rolleyes:
 
don't feel bad about saying it. mine (bionic) is barely a toyota anymore. frame, body and seats is about it. you're still practically a purist.:lol:
 
thx. I see I didn't add the wife's FJC yet to the sig. on your problem, I have found when I find a solution to an electrical problem, it was pretty simple. finding it is usually super hard though. sorry I can't much more on that.
 

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