After a 3.6 year hiatus, my 80 is nearly running again (1 Viewer)

wagonteeth

Hippoblanco
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In September of 2016, my timing chain broke. I began the tear down to fix it, pulling parts and nuts and bolts and dropping them in ziplocks and labeling them. In October my ex told me she wanted a divorce (which I gladly agreed with). In November, I bought a house and closed that Decemebr, having my torn to pieces 80 towed to my house and rolled her into the shop.

She sat there with the timing cover off, the head in the back and a stuck upper oil pan. I began rebuilding life and it sadly didn't involve the 80.

I had an issue with the oil pan firmly glued on and couldn't budge it for quite some time. Easily distracted, I would try to break it loose and after failing yet again, would be sidetracked for a couple months before repeating the process.

Long story edited, I popped the pan off and ordered a timing set, then got a head gasket kit a few months back.

I met and married a beautiful, fierce, loving Dominican Latina and we began discussing road trips.

She encouraged me to get the 80 running and I took to finding a shop to rework my head. A local shop I found happens to be well known for their work on JDM tuner heads, so I took my tractor head by for a complete resurface and valve job.

The head is now on, the timing set is in and cams are in.

As I near the home stretch (new aisin water pump is on, fuel filter going on today), I have a question about the start up.

A couple years ago I siphoned the gas out of the tank and ran it in my 4runner(with no issues), but as I come close to filling her with fluids, I'm wondering what I should do about the near empty gas tank. I would estimate that there is less than a gallon in there.

I can drain the rest and dump in 5 gallons of ethanol free, but should I include any treatment with the first tank?
 

ppc

M Go Blue
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I would be concerned about any rust issues that developed inside the tank. I don't think the small amount of remaining fuel would be an issue but you should open the tank, pull the pump assembly out, inspect the tank and at minimum replace the sock/filter on the inlet of the pump.
 

wagonteeth

Hippoblanco
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Ok, thanks for the tips. I'll drain what's left and see what comes out. I'll look into dropping the tank I doubt that it is rusty having been in the shop and even the exposed block had not rust to contend with.
 

wagonteeth

Hippoblanco
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The most important....congrats on the Dominican Latina.
Oh hell yeah, she is the best woman I've ever known. She had a wrangler that we just traded in on a 2020 4runner, so were an all toyota family now-80, Tundra, 4Runner. She just ordered a gobi rack for it and is wanting lift and tires and a rooftop tent.
 

ppc

M Go Blue
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Ok, thanks for the tips. I'll drain what's left and see what comes out. I'll look into dropping the tank I doubt that it is rusty having been in the shop and even the exposed block had not rust to contend with.

There is no need to drop the tank. The fuel pump is accessed through the cabin under the driver's side second row of seats. The opening is plenty large to inspect the condition of the tank. Remove both second row seats in order to pull back the carpet and the access panel is right there.
 
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When you go to start it, pull the plugs so it can't start. Turn it over with the starter until you see oil flowing in the valve cover, might need a mirror and flashlight. Once you have oil pumping to the top of the engine, then put the plugs in and fire it up. You don't want to start an engine with oil starved journals.
 

wagonteeth

Hippoblanco
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Good point. I did use assembly lube, but I've been thinking about the dry start.

Any sense in pouring some fresh oil over the cams before putting the valve cover on?
 
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The oil pumps up and through the journals at 40-70 psi, it won't penetrate into the journals if it's just poured over the top. Oil poured on the cams will help, but you should have the valve cover all buttoned up by the time you're going for a start up. The assembly lube smeared on the cams will be fine.
 
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Worland, WY
I feel for ya man, but I’m glad you’re back at it. I ended up in a similar situation when I had another kid and got divorced/moved 10 years ago, leaving my old ‘75 Chevy behind. My 80 pacified me while I was dislocated out in eastern SD with very little space and a good 11 hours from ‘home’. Then I fell in love with the 80 and I’m glad I bought it, rusty or not. Once it’s done-ish I need to get back to the old Chevy. Glad to hear you’re at it again though, it’s something I desperately needed to get back to myself.
 

baldilocks

Battle Ground, WA
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I doubt you will find rust in the tank. I stored a tank for nearly five years ,of which about three years it sat outside with the holes taped up, and no rust developed. My tanks are 93 and 94 and both were clean inside and the fuel strainers were both practically like new when I first peaked inside.
 

ppc

M Go Blue
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I doubt you will find rust in the tank. I stored a tank for nearly five years ,of which about three years it sat outside with the holes taped up, and no rust developed. My tanks are 93 and 94 and both were clean inside and the fuel strainers were both practically like new when I first peaked inside.

Or you could find something similar to the images below...

B8177F54-BC3C-4758-955C-B3FFED12ADC4.jpeg


D3C9A615-C91B-423C-907F-C71079309157.jpeg



CC255AC3-4EC4-4EC5-971B-FA0D6C3D489D.jpeg


B8177F54-BC3C-4758-955C-B3FFED12ADC4.jpeg
 
Last edited:
Joined
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Tucson AZ
A bit of fuel in the tank is worse than no fuel.
A bit of fuel causes more rust and than no fuel, in my experience anyways.

I have a general best practice question for long term storage of a used tank for you or anyone. I pulled the sender and pump hanger and stored separately. I emptied out all the gas, let it completely evaporate out and taped up all the openings. I was thinking of misting the inside with something like WD40. This is in AZ, so mostly a dry heat.
 
Joined
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east coast Canada
I have a general best practice question for long term storage of a used tank for you or anyone. I pulled the sender and pump hanger and stored separately. I emptied out all the gas, let it completely evaporate out and taped up all the openings. I was thinking of misting the inside with something like WD40. This is in AZ, so mostly a dry heat.

I would use something like fluid film or atf if it was me. But I live in a moist environment. I would not let the pump store dry also. I would add a light, 10W, oil into it. I have seen pumps fail when left dry.
 

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