What is wrong in this picture? (rear drive shaft)

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Jun 5, 2009
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Golden, CO
Recently I have been getting a faint oil burning smell, after normal driving, when everything is hot. I am guessing this is the cause. Thoughts and suggestions much appreciated!
Thanks!

Garrett
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That's normal; the driveshaft yolk pukes out some grease and it gets flung onto the muffler. Looks like there isn't much build-up on the muffler; like the driveshaft yolk hasn't been greased all that often. Was it just recently greased?
 
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For the yolks you pump until the yolk just starts to be pushed out but no more. In the top photo you can see the zerk fitting for the yolk pointing straight up, it's in line with the bottom of the grease stain on the muffler.

Here's a photo of a front driveshaft and yolk:
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Joined
Jun 5, 2009
Messages
70
Location
Golden, CO
Thanks guys! That is exactly what I was hoping to hear. And thanks Kernal for the tip on keeping it greased, sounds easy enough. From the records it was greased at 43K, in 2009 :D I think this truck is glad it is finally getting driven!! Sorry for the ignorance, but thanks to this forum I'm learning!!
 
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Alabama
I cant remember where but I think I read that it was better to pull the shaft apart and grease it so it willl slide in and out when the suspension flexes. If the grease is pumped in it while together when you flex the suspension a lot it doesnt allow the shaft to fully compress and puts more stress on the transfercase.
 
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That has been discussed a lot. When I pulled my front driveshaft apart I found some old grease still at the bottom of the cavity in the yolk. I also noticed when I put the yolk back into the driveshaft on the bench the trapped air pressure was enough to keep me from compressing the yolk all the way down. So it got me to thinking that if there is an air "bubble" inside the yolk cavity and seeing that there was some 15 year old grease still in the yolk, I'm thinking that maybe when we see the yolk first start to move it may be trapped air that is pushing it out at least initially?? I still stop hand-pumping grease as soon as I see the yolk move. Here's another photo of the bottom of the yolk cavity right after pulling it apart. I had greased it within a few hundred miles. You can see some original pink grease at the bottom of the first photo and after I cleaned it out you can see the hole at the bottom where the fresh grease gets pumped in via the zerk.
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