Tool Box Stuff

Dissent

Questioning my life choices...
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Sep 27, 2012
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3,906
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Loudon, TN
Here's a few things that came in handy during a trail breakdown yesterday wherein 3x passenger lower trunion bolts sheared off, disabling one rig. Most people carry some of this stuff and fortunately, when everyone dug through their tool boxes, we had it all as a group. I decided to add a few things to my kit based on this experience and promised a write up so here you go.

I was going through the truck last night to locate most of this stuff (I have it under seats, in the walls, wrapped around other things, on the attic rack, in my Ridgid totes, etc.) and found making a simple bulleted list to keep in the console or toolbox would be handy mapping out where everything is. There's nothing worse than knowing you have something and not being able to find it.

  • Bulleted Gear/Tool List in Glove Box - Quick reference map of all my gear shoved in every nook and cranny.
  • Trunion Stud and Nut Set - Pretty obvious. I'm planning on adding Absolute Wit's End Nut Huggers too.
  • Torque Wench - Pretty obvious...hopefully. You know who you are. :)
  • 1/2" Impact Wrench with Battery - Lots of stuff plus with a simple socket, the OEM jack becomes a powered jack!
  • Baby Wipes - Lots of uses but cleans grease and oil from hands and tools easily. I have a Rubbermaid container I carry 24x7 that keeps them happy for nearly a year without severely drying out when I was in Phoenix. Occasionally I'll pour in 1/4 cup of distilled water to keep them nice and moist.
  • 20-30 Gal Trash Bags - Lots of uses but after dealing with leaking axle grease, and lots of baby wipes...keep the trail clean!
  • 1/2" socket (1/2" drive to fit Impact) - Place on OEM jack shaft to run jack up and down quickly. This is a shoulder, mental and morale lifesaver. I use a large round flat magnet (about the size of a 2016 watch battery) to hold the socket to the base. Placed in one recessed corner on the jack, it stays on fine with all my wheeling and doesn't get lost.
  • Quart of Axle Grease - Replacement fluid, was surprised to see someone carried one in real life...very thankful it was there.
  • Work Light - A solid flood or spot light with a magnetic base. I use cheap Chinese LED off road lights, equipped with RAM ball Mounts and SAE termination (plus a handful of extension cords) along with various adapters, including cigarette lighter, to place lights where I need them on my L-Track around the truck for trail lighting, camping or maintenance. Turns out they work great just lying in thr dirt too. It was very dark on the trail (like 6:00PM, even though it was actually 12:30PM). I see Rigid offers the Ignite super bright LED with a GoPro compatible mount making it easy for magnetic or suction cup mount. Carry spare batteries too. I store them in my ARB fridge so they don't get lost. Arw easy to get to and might suffer less when the fridge is running.
  • Small Cold Chisel - Used to drift out sheared studs. Make sure it's sharp.
  • Small Bastard File - Turns out this works in a pinch if you don't have a cold chisel. Lots of sharp, hardened corners to bite sheared bolts.
  • Land Cruiser Safe Jack Adapter - Support one of our own with this amazing adapter. I used it to do a full brake swap and it was invaluable. After seeing it used on the trail, it's foolish not to have one. Link here: Land Cruiser Safe Jack Adapter - A must have - https://forum.ih8mud.com/threads/land-cruiser-safe-jack-adapter-a-must-have.937460/
  • 6x8 Tarp - Blankets won't cut it when you're laying in a river of axle grease. Having a pair would make it easier for a 2-man repair.
  • Extra Clothes - Between the grease and humidity, an extra shirt would've been nice. I'm planning on picking up a Tyvek Painter Coverall for such situations.
  • Exam Gloves - Keep your manicure clean and purdy.
  • Extra Shoes - I have a pair of strapped sandals from Walmart I never wear but will now keep in the truck 24x7 in case I wreck my shoes on a soggy trail. Wet shoes suck.
  • Baby Powder - I always carry this in my truck gear box. Humidity and heat suck. This is an easy morale booster and welcome any time.
  • Umbrella/Rain Suit - Somehow we managed to evade the downpour until AFTER the repair was done and cleaned up but it let loose right after for the next few hours. I carry an umbrella and Frog Togs, 1 size bigger than I normally wear, to fit over winter jackets.
  • Tripod Stool - It can be exhausting watching someone work. I carry a Walkstool Comfort XXL (heavy duty, adjustable height 13"-22" (rated to 495lbs) with a mesh rope backpack). I don't weigh 495lbs (yet) but It's nice to have a seat to lend knowing it will take the weight and when the kids were small, they would want to sit kn my knee. I've used this on trail runs, camp fires, event shows, standing in long lines and all sorts of spots. They store in the space of a Mag-Lite and beat sitting on a muddy rock or stump. Link here: Walkstool: Walkstool Comfort - https://www.amazon.com/stores/page/F68B90D0-B885-45DE-8CC1-9D21B83AE7CA?ingress=2&visitId=8f53a947-f87d-477c-b07e-9d846bb33310&ref_=ast_bln
  • Toolbox- I standardized on water proof, stackable Ridgid tool boxes about 6 years ago. They lock together and can ride in the truck or on the truck and stay dry. I have 2x that always ride in the truck. I use a 3rd with a carpeted board in conjunction with a spacer block under the 2nd row as a sleeping platform. I can stack or store them around camp for use as a table or as additional seating. I typically set them under the truck when I sleep inside knowing no critters can get inside. I can stack 6x in the rear (2x stacks of 2x med and 1x small) and 2x med stacked in each 2nd row (folded up), secured with my Frontrunner Stratchit straps. I added climbing rings to the 2nd row bolts for tie down points. Links here:
  • Metal Sawzall or Hacksaw Blade - Small to store and great for cutting off bent or mangled parts.
  • Dremel with Small Carbide Stone - Cordless is ideal, corded if you have an inverter to run it. Would've been handy to grind the sheared bolts to ease extraction.
  • Tap for Knuckle Studs (Size???) - Some of the holes were oval'd a bit and a tap could have cleaned them up nicely before installing the new studs.
  • Cordless Sawzall - Adding this because I was thinking back on all the fallen trees we encountered. It's great for clearing trail obstructions/trees/firewood. I do carry a folding pruning saw and a hand held chain saw in a small pouch but when we bought our DeWalt 20V cordless chainsaw for home last year, I had planned on taking it out on the trail for fallen trees and what not BUT it leaks oil like crazy with an awful oiling design. I found these great 9" pruning blades for a Sawzall that I'll combine with my 20V DeWalt Sawzall to take care of these tasks. They cut through a 4" log like butter and take the same battery as my impact. Plus, with my always present metal blade, it would take care of metal tasks as well. I'm not sure if it wouldv'e helped to slot the sheared studs for removal but would've been handy to try. Link here for the pruning blades: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B072WM881G/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 
Last edited:

Njck22

SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 24, 2017
Messages
765
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Texas
Invaluable resource. Thank you. I always mean to write down every obscure tool I use when replacing wear items that could leave you stranded. I also find that a 1 foot long 2x4 can fulfill a variety of needs.
 
Joined
May 26, 2008
Messages
431
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Leduc County
What happened to shear off 3 trunnion bolts? I'm generally on bush trails so never seen one go before. Also carry a Hi-Lift to jack up out of mudholes in a pinch.
 

LandLocked93

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Joined
Jun 11, 2018
Messages
1,059
Location
Colorado
Here's a few things that came in handy during a trail breakdown yesterday wherein 3x passenger lower trunion bolts sheared off, disabling one rig. Most people carry some of this stuff and fortunately, when everyone dug through their tool boxes, we had it all as a group. I decided to add a few things to my kit based on this experience and promised a write up so here you go.

Trunion Stud and Nut Set - Pretty obvious. I'm planning on adding Absolute Wit's End Nut Huggers too.
Torque Wench - Pretty obvious...hopefully. You know who you are. :)
1/2" Impact wrench with batteries - Lots of stuff plus with a simple socket, the OEM jack becomes a powered jack!
Baby Wipes - Lots of uses but cleans grease and oil from hands and tools easily. I have a Rubbermaid container I carry 24x7 that keeps them happy for nearly a year without severely drying out when I was in Phoenix. Occasionally I'll pour in 1/4 cup of distilled water to keep them nice and moist.
20-30 Gal Trash Bags - Lots of uses but after dealing with leaking axle grease, and lots of baby wipes...keep the trail clean!
1/2" socket (1/2" drive to fit Impact) - Place on OEM jack shaft to run jack up and down quickly. This is a shoulder, mental and morale lifesaver. I use a large round flat magnet (about the size of a 2016 watch battery) to hold the socket to the base. Placed in one recessed corner on the jack, it stays on fine with all my wheeling and doesn't get lost.
Quart of Axle Grease - Replacement fluid, was surprised to see someone carried one in real life...very thankful it was there.
Work Light - A solid flood or spot light with a magnetic base. I use cheap Chinese LED off road lights, equipped with RAM ball Mounts and SAE termination (plus a handful of extension cords) along with various adapters, including cigarette lighter, to place lights where I need them on my L-Track around the truck for trail lighting, camping or maintenance. Turns out they work great just lying in thr dirt too. It was very dark on the trail (like 6:00PM, even though it was actually 12:30PM). I see Rigid offers the Ignite super bright LED with a GoPro compatible mount making it easy for magnetic or suction cup mount. Carry spare batteries too. I store them in my ARB fridge so they don't get lost. Arw easy to get to and might suffer less when the fridge is running.
Small Cold Chisel - Used to drift out sheared studs. Make sure it's sharp.
Small Bastard File - Turns out this works in a pinch if you don't have a cold chisel. Lots of sharp, hardened corners to bite sheared bolts.
Land Cruiser Safe Jack Adapter - Support one of our own with this amazing adapter. I used it to do a full brake swap and it was invaluable. After seeing it used on the trail, it's foolish not to have one. Link below:
Land Cruiser Safe Jack Adapter - A must have - https://forum.ih8mud.com/threads/land-cruiser-safe-jack-adapter-a-must-have.937460/
6x8 Tarp - Blankets won't cut it when you're laying in a river of axle grease. Having a pair would make it easier for a 2-man repair.
Extra Clothes - Between the grease and humidity, an extra shirt would've been nice. I'm planning on picking up a Tyvek Painter Coverall for such situations.
Exam Gloves - Keep your manicure clean and purdy.
Extra Shoes - I have a pair of strapped sandals from Walmart I never wear but will now keep in the truck 24x7 in case I wreck my shoes on a soggy trail. Wet shoes suck.
Baby Powder - I always carry this in my truck gear box. Humidity and heat suck. This is an easy morale booster and welcome any time.
Umbrella/Rain Suit - Somehow we managed to evade the downpour until AFTER the repair was done and cleaned up but it let loose right after for the next few hours. I carry an umbrella and Frog Togs, 1 size bigger than I normally wear, to fit over winter jackets.
Tripod Stool - It can be exhausting watching someone work. I carry a heavy duty, adjustable height model (rated to 350lbs) with a mesh rope backpack. I don't weigh 350 (yet) but It's nice to have a seat to lend knowing it will take the weight and when thr kids were small, they would want to sit kn my knee. I've used this on trail runs, camp fires, event shows, standing in long lines and all sorts of spots. They store in the space of a Mag-Lite and beat sitting on a muddy rock or stump.
Toolbox - I standardized on water proof, stackable Rigid tool boxes about 6 years ago. They lock together and can ride in the truck or on the truck and stay dry. I have 2x that always ride in the truck. I use a 3rd with a carpeted board in conjunction with a spacer block under the 2nd row as a sleeping platform. I can stack or store them around camp for use as a table or as additional seating. I typically set them under the truck when I sleep inside knowing no critters can get inside. I can stack 6x in the rear (2x stacks of 2x med and 1x small) and 2x med stacked in each 2nd row (folded up), secured with my Stratchit straps. I added climbing rings to the 2nd row bolts for tie down points.
This is classified information.
edit:You're on notice.
lol
 

Dissent

Questioning my life choices...
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Loudon, TN
This is classified information.
edit:You're on notice.
lol

What happened to shear off 3 trunnion bolts? I'm generally on bush trails so never seen one go before. Also carry a Hi-Lift to jack up out of mudholes in a pinch.
Hit a rock just right. Good idea on the high lift. I have a long one and can't find a place for it on my truck. :p
 

FMC80

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Beyond
Holy hell! This sounds like a pack-out for a 365 deployment. Violently agree on baby powder. It’s what I imagine a million fairies caressing my lug nuts would feel like in those situations. Gold bond is even better.

Thanks for the list. I never would’ve thought to consider many of these things but I can see how important they can be, even if it’s just for comfort in a bad situation.
 
Joined
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Messages
619
Location
The Saratoga slums, CA
Having gone through this also, there are a couple other things I would suggest:
1. A battery powered Dremel with a fine tip carbide stone. The most time consuming part of this particular repair was extracting the sheered studs. The Dremel that I left at home would have made big difference.
2. A tap to chase the threads in the knuckle once the studs have been extracted. I had a couple holes that were ovaled once the studs were removed.
 
Joined
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Messages
746
Location
Santa Cruz
Nice write up! I know losing your axle studs is a common one on the 80s and I try to have all the needed pieces to do the job on the trail if needed. I will be adding a chisel to my tool roll and probably stuff some light coveralls into the DS rear quarter panel by the Toyota jack. Cheers
 

Dissent

Questioning my life choices...
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Having gone through this also, there are a couple other things I would suggest:
1. A battery powered Dremel with a fine tip carbide stone. The most time consuming part of this particular repair was extracting the sheered studs. The Dremel that I left at home would have made big difference.
2. A tap to chase the threads in the knuckle once the studs have been extracted. I had a couple holes that were ovaled once the studs were removed.
Great idea for both. I have a 350W inverter I don't ever use and it turns out my corded Dremel runs fine from it. (Added to the list on Post #1)
 
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Dissent

Questioning my life choices...
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I'll try and post up a pic of the setup.
Interested to see a pic of what you've done to drive the jack.
I welded an old ½" drive socket onto a spare OEM jack so it can be driven with ½ extensions and ratchet etc.
It works well, but not ideal
 

Dissent

Questioning my life choices...
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One thing I forgot (just added it to the list in Post #1) is a metal Sawzall/hacksaw blade. My old club encountered an issue in Death Valley that required cutting off a part from a stranded car and handed out Metal Sawzall blades to everyone at a club meeting to keep in their glove box. I came across mine this morning and forgot I had it. Apparently nobody had one in Death Valley but made due somehow...this would've saved the day!
 
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Interested to see a pic of what you've done to drive the jack.
I welded an old ½" drive socket onto a spare OEM jack so it can be driven with ½ extensions and ratchet etc.
It works well, but not ideal
I just insert the jack tool into my 1/2" Dewalt drill to make my jack power up/down.

Easy peasy.

The male end must fit into the female end.
 

Dissent

Questioning my life choices...
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I started there but when my boy bought me a shiny new impact for Father's Day...the drill went back in the garage. :)

Many people seriously under estimate the OEM jack. That thing is a beast and so much safer than a Hi-Lift when there's an option. With the Safe Jack adapter, it's really solid.
 

Dissent

Questioning my life choices...
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Loudon, TN
I was going through the truck last night to locate most of this stuff (I have it under seats, in the walls, wrapped around other things, on the attic rack, in my Ridgid totes, etc.) and found a simple bulleted list to keep in the console or toolbox would be handy mapping out where everything is.
 

baldilocks

Battle Ground, WA
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I carry a bit called “Rescue Bit” that is reverse cut so it’s used in the counterclockwise direction. This bit is designed to cut hard metal and in reverse a bit has the chance of catching the broken stud and backing it out.

Studs that are not compromised in any way and are properly torqued should stand up to tough situations. This has been my experience with 40 and 80 knuckles up to 37” tires with hydro assist steering and pounding boulders.

Broken knuckle studs are NOT a common failure. It does happen but in rare numbers of instances when compared to the number of instances they go wheeling and don’t break world wide. We never hear or read about how someone finished an epic wheeling trip without braking down but folks are quick to blame Toyota for there own incompetence.

New hardware backed up by very regular maintenance is the only way to ensure more trouble free off road fun.
 

Dissent

Questioning my life choices...
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I like that Rescue Bit...going to pick one up and add to the toolbox! Fully agreed on most failures regarding Mr. T vs. lack regular maintenance. PM and Baselining is where it's at!
 

Dissent

Questioning my life choices...
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I carry a bit called “Rescue Bit” that is reverse cut so it’s used in the counterclockwise direction. This bit is designed to cut hard metal and in reverse a bit has the chance of catching the broken stud and backing it out.

Studs that are not compromised in any way and are properly torqued should stand up to tough situations. This has been my experience with 40 and 80 knuckles up to 37” tires with hydro assist steering and pounding boulders.

Broken knuckle studs are NOT a common failure. It does happen but in rare numbers of instances when compared to the number of instances they go wheeling and don’t break world wide. We never hear or read about how someone finished an epic wheeling trip without braking down but folks are quick to blame Toyota for there own incompetence.

New hardware backed up by very regular maintenance is the only way to ensure more trouble free off road fun.
What size bit do you find the best to carry?
 
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