Suggestions re Sap Problem

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Nov 18, 2003
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For some reason, the trees in front of my house have started to release sap (they haven't done this in the prior 9 years I've lived there). My truck has what looks like a fine mist of sap droplets on it. Any suggestions as to how to clean the sap off painted body panels and/or the windshield (windshield is less problematic, but any magic suggestions would be appreciated)? I need something that gets the sap off but that doesn't require me to re-wax the truck (LC's are big and a PITA to wax--I try to do it only a few times per year).

It seems that I've finally encountered an issue where my first attempt at a solution is something other than lubing the drive shafts.
 

2000UZJ

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Get it off soon. Our black Benz has sap marks everywhere. Looks like poo. But goes like hell.
 
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Bamabrock: Wouldn't a chainsaw scratch my paint??

I think I'll try rubbing alcohol and then re-wax the lazy way with a liquid wax (or even a spray on detailer). I hope I'm not doing this every two weeks until fall.
 
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With tree sap rubbing alcohol is your best bet. Just remember to wax the car after as the alcohol strips the wax too..
 
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Bug and Tar Remover would do it, but first make sure to thoroughly wash the sappy areas and allow to air-dry. (Drying with a chamois or towel might leave fibers stuck in sap, problematic for subsequent sap removal because the foreign material might include stuff that could scratch paint topcoat.)

As far as I can tell, the stuff sold as Bug and Tar Remover is actually just mineral spirits. I've used mineral spirits too, to remove tar from vehicle exterior, works fine no problem with vehicles I've tried it on. (Mineral spirits is orders of magnitude cheaper than Bug and Tar Remover.)

Regarding wax: Why do you wax a 100? The finish (paint + clear/topcoats) are very durable on these vehicles, they do not require waxing or anything else other than occasional washing. Mine has factory-new looking shine, it has never been waxed (12 years). People ask me "what do you do to keep it looking so nice?", I answer "nothing - and that's the point." Waxing is a holdover from the old days when vehicle finishes were not so durable. Nowadays a good quality vehicle like a Japanese-built Toyota does not need waxing, and in fact the mechanical action of waxing (and other things like buffing, etc.) may actually degrade the top finish by leaving micro-scratches visible as swirl marks in certain light angles.

However: If you have buffed, waxed, and otherwise "loved on" your 100 enough, you may have worn off enough topcoat that you do indeed now need to wax it occasionally just to keep it from deteriorating further.

One more thing: If the sap gets in your window tracks, it may cause dragging and shuddering of window in up/down motion. I used silicone spray on paper towel folded over plastic trim stick to clean the felt channels, repeatedly changing silicone/towels until towel was coming out fairly clean-looking. This solved the problem on mine.
 
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Nottajeep

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Regarding wax: Why do you wax a 100? The finish (paint + clear/topcoats) are very durable on these vehicles, they do not require waxing or anything else other than occasional washing. Mine has factory-new looking shine, it has never been waxed (12 years). People ask me "what do you do to keep it looking so nice?", I answer "nothing - and that's the point." Waxing is a holdover from the old days when vehicle finishes were not so durable. Nowadays a good quality vehicle like a Japanese-built Toyota does not need waxing, and in fact the mechanical action of waxing (and other things like buffing, etc.) may actually degrade the top finish by leaving micro-scratches visible as swirl marks in certain light angles.

However: If you have buffed, waxed, and otherwise "loved on" your 100 enough, you may have worn off enough topcoat that you do indeed now need to wax it occasionally just to keep it from deteriorating further.

Sorry, but I have to disagree with you here. Waxing adds another layer on to the paint and clear coat. Another coat that takes on bird ****, polluted rain, sap, UV rays etc... A good carnauba wax is always a smart choice no matter how good the factory paint is.

When I bought my hundy the finish was dull. After a few actions with a good mothers wax system, it made the paint take on a whole new look. I could not get there with just washing.
 
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1. wash with light mixture of dish soap and water( 5 gal bucket)

2. clay bar

3. scratchX

4. polish

5. wax

takes a loooong time but the results are phenominal
 
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Sorry, but I have to disagree with you here. Waxing adds another layer on to the paint and clear coat. Another coat that takes on bird ****, polluted rain, sap, UV rays etc... A good carnauba wax is always a smart choice no matter how good the factory paint is.

When I bought my hundy the finish was dull. After a few actions with a good mothers wax system, it made the paint take on a whole new look. I could not get there with just washing.

Did you buy your hundy brand-new? If finish was dull on brand-new hundy, then dealer should have made it right under warranty. (Although difficult to prove warranty claim on this, because it is subjective.)

Again: A good-quality vehicle (such as Japanese-built Toyota) finish really doesn't need waxing. Unless (a) the finish is defective from the factory, or (b) it has been deteriorated by mechanical action such as waxing, buffing, rubbing, polishing, cloth/chamois drying, etc. to the point that the protective top/clearcoat is degraded.

That said, there ARE lots of vehicles with exterior finishes that are not very good quality from the factory (some cheaper marques and American marques) - these may benefit from waxing etc.

Also, there ARE lots of vehicles that fall into category (b) above - especially vehicles "detailed" and otherwise gussied up for used car dealer lots. (One MORE reason to never buy from a used car dealer.)

My info on vehicle finish durability and quality is relevant for about the last 20 years, and based on inside info from the major Japanese automaker where I worked in the 90's and also personal experience.

YMMV. :)
 
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FYI, Toyota NON-metallic paints do NOT have a clear coat. ONLY the metallic colors have a clear coat. Therefore, white and black can and will oxidize "faster" than a metallic color in similar conditions. A coat of wax on a non-clearcoated paint will help to minimize oxidation.

I personally will use a 3M finishing glaze on occasion (maybe annually at most) followed by a polymer sealer (not a wax). I do this on both my wife's Black Solara (no clear coat) and my LC (galactic gray mica w/ clear).
 
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is it metallic? are you the original owner?

typically clear coat peels when it hasn't been applied correctly. it must be shot over "new" paint, usually less than 30-min after spraying the final coat in order for it to chemically bond.

sounds like some repairs may have been made to the roof, they shot the repair w/ new paint to blend it in to the original, then shot clear over everything to mask the repair.

or, lexus is different and uses clear on their plain black paint. i know on the 99/00 4runners, white and black were NOT clear coated.
 

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