RTH: Did I do something wrong?

Joined
May 6, 2011
Messages
889
Location
Davis County, UT
 
So...finishing up the front axle, I got the adjusting nut torqued, put the lock washer on and bent the tab, checked the pre load and all was clear. as I was torquing the lock nut (at 65 ft. lbs as per FSM), I hadn't even got to torque before it sheared the tooth off the brand new Mr. T lock nut.
Just for clarification, the tab was bent over the adjusting nut but not the lock nut, so it was the friction between the lock nut and washer that sheared the tooth and spun the adjustment nut with it.
Any thoughts on why this is/how to avoid this when I get my new lock-washer?
Thanks as always.
 
Joined
Mar 31, 2014
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Gone
Check the back of the lock nut (final nut). Make sure it's smooth and free of any burr thingy that could catch & grip the lock washer.

Also make sure that the big socket didn't/doesn't somehow grab the lock washer.

What happened is very unusual.
Make sure it's a Toyota lock washer. If originated else where (farther East) anything is possible.
 
Joined
May 10, 2005
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Calgary, Alberta
 
 
 
I may be way off base here, it's been awhile since I was into my hubs.
But I though things in there were measured in INCH/POUNDS.
So double check the manual.
 

CaptClose

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Feb 8, 2016
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San Antonio, TX
I may be way off base here, it's been awhile since I was into my hubs.
But I though things in there were measured in INCH/POUNDS.
So double check the manual.
FSM calls for 58-72 foot pounds. He should have been alright, assuming his torque wrench is properly calibrated. Even then, he would have had to have been way off to shear that washer I think.
 
Joined
May 15, 2005
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8,079
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Ladysmith
 
 
 
The nuts have a sharp flat side and a slightly rounded side. I found this exact thing on my BJ74 when I
did the brakes. Then a guy working on Toyota's told me that one side of the nut is specifically to go against the locking washer.
I just cant' remember which side. Anyone got an idea of the truth to this?
 

lovetoski

GOLD Star
Joined
Jul 13, 2003
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4,633
 
 
 
I do it in a different sequence. I torque the lock nut, and then bend the tabs to lock both the nuts in place. Sometimes after the lock nut is torqued, the bearing pre-load isn't exactly where I want it, so that's why I leave the tabs for last.
 
Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
8,079
Location
Ladysmith
 
 
 
The nuts have a sharp flat side and a slightly rounded side. I found this exact thing on my BJ74 when I
did the brakes. Then a guy working on Toyota's told me that one side of the nut is specifically to go against the locking washer.
I just cant' remember which side. Anyone got an idea of the truth to this?
This the answer I got.
"The nuts are shaped like that because they are stamped out.

However, I usually put the two rounded sides together as they prevent shearing the tongue off the lock tab, and a dab of grease on the outside of the locking tab before I put the last nut on to help it slide easily and tighten up. "

Tightening the inside nut is the one that sets the preload. So if this done correctly then the outer nut is just a lock nut. The grease between the nut and lock washer allows it to tighten without grabbing the washer. Grabbing the washer is what shears the tongue off the lock tab. Then folding the lock tabs over the outer locknut keeps it in place. I wouldn't recommend pushing lock tabs back over the inside nut. To me the whole idea is the outer lock nut is just security. If it is to loosen off, by having the tabs folded back over the inside nut then you are effectively defeating the purpose of the locking washer and outer nut. This just my reasoning.
From my most recent experience with a sheared tongue off the lock tab. The bearings had loosened and there was a definite clunk with the whole wheel. So from now on, I'll check my wheel bearings every time I have a tire jacked up. At least if I carry a spare locking washer it's a 15 min job to check and replace.
 
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