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OBA Tank

Discussion in '40- & 55-Series Tech' started by CruisinGA, Jan 12, 2004.

  1. CruisinGA

    CruisinGA

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    Alright-so I've got every little detail of my OBA setup figgered out, cept a tank. Don't want to drop a lot of coin on one.
    So what are yall usin, how much did it cost, and do you like it?
    If you are a good welder (not me) would it not be possible to make a rectangular tank? That would enable much more storage and I could have the ports anywhere I wanted, any number of them, any size I wanted.
     
  2. 73lndcrsr

    73lndcrsr SILVER Star

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    I have one similar to the attached pic. I have it mounted on the rear wheel well behind the drivers seat. I like the tank, but I really want to mount it somewhere else. I am thinking of using a smaller diameter, longer tank under the body between the frame rails.

    I have a buddy that uses his roll cage. I may do that in the future, but mine won't hold air right now.
     
  3. hammerhead

    hammerhead

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    I use a small military surplus tank from an army truck. It's about 18 or 20 inches long and about 8 or 10 inches around. It lives under the back of the rig between the rear shock mount crossmember and the rear bumper in between the frame rails.

    A pressurized vessel must be round or will bulge and burst. DO NOT make a rectangle tank unless you use such a thick material as to withstand the pressure.
     
  4. Brog

    Brog

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    High Pressure + non-cylindrical vessel = bad day

    Try a junkyard for big rigs.
    They all have to store air to run their brakes and what not.

    I'm thinking two or three long cylinders like the portable stacked compressors that carpenters use. Put those between the frame rail in the back. Skid plate might be in order as well. :cheers:

    Brog
     
  5. theo

    theo

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    I used a brake tank from a Mack truck. Got a bunch of heavy duty hose with it too. Trouble is, it cost $30 and I had to use POR-15 on it. Spent hours and hours. Could have bought a shiny one for about the same $.

    Mounted crosswise behind the seats. I wanted it under the frame in back but I have an extra fuel tank that is going there.

    I like the bumper storage idea but I haven't tried it. Remember you'll need to be able to drain the water out of it once in awhile.

    You only need two fittings in the tank. One to keep it pressurized, and one to drain the water. Take lines to tools and such from your manifold under the hood (or wherever it is mounted). :)
     
  6. CruisinGA

    CruisinGA

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    [quote author=theo link=board=1;threadid=10047;start=msg89678#msg89678 date=1074010079]You only need two fittings in the tank. One to keep it pressurized, and one to drain the water. Take lines to tools and such from your manifold under the hood (or wherever it is mounted). :)
    [/quote]
    I know, but if I put a quick disconnect in the rear bumper, It would be easier to just run another line out of the tank, since the tank will already be in the rear.

    I guess I'll just measure the space I got, and keep my eyes open for a tank.
    I have to put it under the rear, between the frame rails cause I need every inch of interior room.
    Thanks guys