How does a 1FZ-FE usually die? (1 Viewer)

Ozark Bushwalker

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Although I moved on from my old 97 FZJ80, I retain a lot of respect for and interest in the platform, especially the last of the big inline-six motors: the venerable 1FZ.

However, nothing is impervious to decades of use, abuse, and neglect. Mine was still purring like a kitten at 233k. It did leak some oil but. I had replaced the coolant hoses, which are a common point of failure which can lead to overheating.

Anyway, I'm curious how these robust engines usually meet their demise in the real world. Do people simply neglect leaks and run them severely low on oil and coolant? Does the composite head-gasket material itself fail, or does the long Al/Fe head-block interface warp over time with many heat cycles?

Or if no catastrophic failure occurs, do they simply gradually lose PSI until they are at 500k unopened, but consuming a quart of oil a day and delivering less than 100 HP to the wheels, and a rebuild is al but necessary?

I know I'm just throwing various scenarios out there and every truck is different, depending on how it's driven, what maintenance is done or not done, etc. But I'd still be curious what those have observed whom have seen and worked on a lot of these engines.

In other words, what will usually fail first, and were these addressed or improved upon in later LC engines like the coil-pack 1FZ and the 2UZ-FE? Is the 1FZ-FE still the standard for durability and reliability?

I'd appreciate any insights. Thanks for reading.
 

ToyotaMatt

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Although I moved on from my old 97 FZJ80, I retain a lot of respect for and interest in the platform, especially the last of the big inline-six motors: the venerable 1FZ.

However, nothing is impervious to decades of use, abuse, and neglect. Mine was still purring like a kitten at 233k. It did leak some oil but. I had replaced the coolant hoses, which are a common point of failure which can lead to overheating.

Anyway, I'm curious how these robust engines usually meet their demise in the real world. Do people simply neglect leaks and run them severely low on oil and coolant? Does the composite head-gasket material itself fail, or does the long Al/Fe head-block interface warp over time with many heat cycles?

Or if no catastrophic failure occurs, do they simply gradually lose PSI until they are at 500k unopened, but consuming a quart of oil a day and delivering less than 100 HP to the wheels, and a rebuild is al but necessary?

I know I'm just throwing various scenarios out there and every truck is different, depending on how it's driven, what maintenance is done or not done, etc. But I'd still be curious what those have observed whom have seen and worked on a lot of these engines.

In other words, what will usually fail first, and were these addressed or improved upon in later LC engines like the coil-pack 1FZ and the 2UZ-FE? Is the 1FZ-FE still the standard for durability and reliability?

I'd appreciate any insights. Thanks for reading.


it will DIE , a slow painful death if you let loose this PO looking dude work on your 1FZ-FE ..........:confused:

- but ............


- i did watch the entire 44 minutes video in one sitting , and there are indeed valuble technical aspects to his dissasemble i found usefull to add it to my you tube library for future reference for sure ! 100% SOLID fare and square ....





 
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COYS

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Although I moved on from my old 97 FZJ80, I retain a lot of respect for and interest in the platform, especially the last of the big inline-six motors: the venerable 1FZ.

In other words, what will usually fail first, and were these addressed or improved upon in later LC engines like the coil-pack 1FZ and the 2UZ-FE? Is the 1FZ-FE still the standard for durability and reliability?

I'd appreciate any insights. Thanks for reading.

Warning: Slightly off-kilter

Humans are stoopid and is the only variable that matters here. I personally don't think the 1FZ-FE is any more "venerable" than any of T's more modern ICEs. In fact, the newer ones make more power and are more efficient else you shouldn't ever entrust Toyota, as an automotive company selling you product, with your hard earned cash. Innovate or die.

Reality is, cars exchange hands multiple times over time. That puts the truck, or your 80, at more risk of neglect in the hands of incompetence. The Land Rover Range Rover is built for the 1st and maybe the 2nd owner within the span of 5 years max. The Land Cruiser can take on much more than that because it's inherently simpler, less costly because that's what the T customer expects. Both brands get their "respect" from the audience to which they serve.

All cars are consumables full stop. I began to lose a noticeable amount of coolant via a leak at cyl 6 so I went through an arduous half year effort to build a new 1FZ-FE long block. I fully expect it (the engine) to go another 280K miles through 2046 - if not longer - with routine maintenance. Truthfully, I'd be disappointed if it didn't last well beyond that since it'll get all the TLC it needs under my care. But the reality is, it'll probably get sold at some point. Given the price my 80 will command, the next owner will probably take care of it as well or better than I. Beyond that who tf knows how it'll be treated or whether it'll even be legal to drive on public roads for that matter. The cycle may continue.

At day's end, it's a nostalgic car to make cool memories with and to max this out, it needs to run w/o issue. Alas, just like anything else created by man, bring $, hoard T parts, and enjoy the journey. Be reminded that you drive a car, not an engine. If durability and reliability are top concerns, buy the newest, lowest mileage, most well documented LC you can afford.

Thanks for asking.
 
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Although I moved on from my old 97 FZJ80, I retain a lot of respect for and interest in the platform, especially the last of the big inline-six motors: the venerable 1FZ.

However, nothing is impervious to decades of use, abuse, and neglect. Mine was still purring like a kitten at 233k. It did leak some oil but. I had replaced the coolant hoses, which are a common point of failure which can lead to overheating.

Anyway, I'm curious how these robust engines usually meet their demise in the real world. Do people simply neglect leaks and run them severely low on oil and coolant? Does the composite head-gasket material itself fail, or does the long Al/Fe head-block interface warp over time with many heat cycles?

Or if no catastrophic failure occurs, do they simply gradually lose PSI until they are at 500k unopened, but consuming a quart of oil a day and delivering less than 100 HP to the wheels, and a rebuild is al but necessary?

I know I'm just throwing various scenarios out there and every truck is different, depending on how it's driven, what maintenance is done or not done, etc. But I'd still be curious what those have observed whom have seen and worked on a lot of these engines.

In other words, what will usually fail first, and were these addressed or improved upon in later LC engines like the coil-pack 1FZ and the 2UZ-FE? Is the 1FZ-FE still the standard for durability and reliability?

I'd appreciate any insights. Thanks for reading.
Low oil. Stuck in the mud without locker. Over rev= rod knock
 
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Slowly and at great expense to their owner
 
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Someone recently posted here about their daughter (I think) running an 80 out of oil. Seems like that would be uncommon with our annoying low oil warning lights.

I'd say that the most common cause of death is either bad front-end collisions (who knows how many of those have happened) or head gaskets. A head gasket blowing, in and of itself, isn't the end of an engine. An uninformed, unaware driver attempting to continue running an engine with a blown head gasket is. My personal belief is that most head gasket failures are caused by neglected cooling systems, but it's hard to determine which is the chicken and which is the egg.

It's been covered extensively that Toyota engineered the industrial versions of the engines for some number of rebuilds. So long as those parts are available, and considering how many of us are at 300k+ miles on original pistons and bearings, there's no reason that a well looked-after 80 can't hit a million miles.
 
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Someone recently posted here about their daughter (I think) running an 80 out of oil. Seems like that would be uncommon with our annoying low oil warning lights.

I'd say that the most common cause of death is either bad front-end collisions (who knows how many of those have happened) or head gaskets. A head gasket blowing, in and of itself, isn't the end of an engine. An uninformed, unaware driver attempting to continue running an engine with a blown head gasket is. My personal belief is that most head gasket failures are caused by neglected cooling systems, but it's hard to determine which is the chicken and which is the egg.

It's been covered extensively that Toyota engineered the industrial versions of the engines for some number of rebuilds. So long as those parts are available, and considering how many of us are at 300k+ miles on original pistons and bearings, there's no reason that a well looked-after 80 can't hit a million miles.
Man no joke. Mine lights up randomly if it’s like 1/2 a qt low.
 

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