Help removing scuff on my newly painted hood!

EStein

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Battle Ground, Washington
So I’ve been slowly getting my parts painted. Finished my hood and it had been drying about 24 hours. I couldn’t wait to get it on my rig to see what it looked like and instead of waiting for my wife to get home to help me I tried to do it myself. In the process I put some scuffs in the new paint. I think it came from the buttons on my jeans or maybe belt. Anyway I’m not sure how to fix this but it’s going to drive me crazy. I’ll just re-shoot the thing if I have to. Any thoughts on how I might get the scuffs out without making it worse? it’s not through the paint to the primer. I know it doesn’t look like much but everything is so shiny and fresh it sticks out like a sore thumb. I was going to pick up some scratch remover and just try to buff it out but I thought I’d check with any experts before trying that. Thanks.
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EStein

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You need to let the paint cure before attempting any sort of correction. Leave it alone for a few weeks. Then come back in with some compound. Is this base clear or single stage? Use the least destructive correction first, as there is no sense in removing more than you need to.
OK I will just leave it alone and not think about it. And then I will plan on buffing that with some compound and then maybe wet sanding if that doesn’t work.… Patience is not one of my virtues! Thanks guys.
 

rghouse

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The hood is the hardest part to paint, I screwed mine up a little bit too. You didn't answer if this is single stage or 2 stage (base+clear)? Some single stage paints do not cut and buff well like the commercial heavy duty type, and re-shooting is the best bet. The paint should say how long until you can work with it, a week or more wait time may not be neccesary.

Also, since the primer is visible, cutting and buffing will likely not work for ya. Doing a single touch up is also out, blending is a pain. Make sure you wet sand the whole thing down 400-600 ish if you re-shoot so the paint can grab. Honestly afyter all you have done, its not that bad. Oh, and remove the hood this time, vertical position will help prevent stuff settling on it as it dries.

It looks great by the way.
 
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Glad to hear I am not the only klutz that masses up.. know the feeling well.
Stay away from sand paper.
Not knowing what kind of paint I will be general.
Paint even catalyzed can stay soft underneath for days to weeks so go slow.
You can get some Turtle wax white rubbing compound or make your own with a good wax and corn starch.
Do a test on a hidden spot as some waxes can soften fresh paint.
With a soft cotton cloth slightly dampened gently rub the paint then buff with a dry soft cotton cloth.
You can rub harder once you get the feel.
I have used soft terry cloth for the rub but test, test, test.
When you feel you have the touch try a small spot on the scuff.
Do it by hand, power buffers can get you in trouble.
If the scuff comes out you may have to do the whole hood to feather out the rubbed spot.
There is a red rubbing compound that is more aggressive but use that as a last resort.
 
Joined
Nov 6, 2013
Messages
784
The hood is the hardest part to paint, I screwed mine up a little bit too. You didn't answer if this is single stage or 2 stage (base+clear)? Some single stage paints do not cut and buff well like the commercial heavy duty type, and re-shooting is the best bet. The paint should say how long until you can work with it, a week or more wait time may not be neccesary.

Also, since the primer is visible, cutting and buffing will likely not work for ya. Doing a single touch up is also out, blending is a pain. Make sure you sand the whole thing down 400-600 ish if you re-shoot so the paint can grab. Honestly afyter all you have done, its not that bad. Oh, and remove the hood this time, vertical position will help prevent stuff settling on it as it dries.

It looks great by the way.
Looks like a one shot paint and I don't think that is primer showing. I just gave a know it all comment on buffing. If the buffing doesn't work I have brought back some color paint with color wax. Had one lady with a red Alfa get upset after I polished her car with the wax, she thought I had painted it and was going to charge her for a paint job. If you try all the polishing and decide you will have to repaint be sure before you start any sanding to clean the hood real good with detergent and wash down with denatured alcohol. Sorry if I sound presumptuous to think you do not know something about painting in light of the beautiful job you have done so far.
 

EStein

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Messages
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Location
Battle Ground, Washington
The hood is the hardest part to paint, I screwed mine up a little bit too. You didn't answer if this is single stage or 2 stage (base+clear)? Some single stage paints do not cut and buff well like the commercial heavy duty type, and re-shooting is the best bet. The paint should say how long until you can work with it, a week or more wait time may not be neccesary.

Also, since the primer is visible, cutting and buffing will likely not work for ya. Doing a single touch up is also out, blending is a pain. Make sure you sand the whole thing down 400-600 ish if you re-shoot so the paint can grab. Honestly afyter all you have done, its not that bad. Oh, and remove the hood this time, vertical position will help prevent stuff settling on it as it dries.

It looks great by the way.
It’s single stage…. looking at it again today I’m not sure if it’s scratched and I’m not sure that that’s primer showing might just be the glare in the photo. It almost just looks like the imprint off of my jeans because of the way I was carrying it. I didn’t paint it on the vehicle. I did have it horizontal though. I was so worried about runs and drips. Then of course I get all those stupid little dust particles. I think I’m gonna wait a month or two and then see if I can buff it out. If not I will paint it again when I do the doors and the hard top. A lot of rust repair on those left to do so probably will be spring time realistically. Thanks for the insight. Really appreciate it.
 

EStein

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Joined
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Messages
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Location
Battle Ground, Washington
Glad to hear I am not the only klutz that masses up.. know the feeling well.
Stay away from sand paper.
Not knowing what kind of paint I will be general.
Paint even catalyzed can stay soft underneath for days to weeks so go slow.
You can get some Turtle wax white rubbing compound or make your own with a good wax and corn starch.
Do a test on a hidden spot as some waxes can soften fresh paint.
With a soft cotton cloth slightly dampened gently rub the paint then buff with a dry soft cotton cloth.
You can rub harder once you get the feel.
I have used soft terry cloth for the rub but test, test, test.
When you feel you have the touch try a small spot on the scuff.
Do it by hand, power buffers can get you in trouble.
If the scuff comes out you may have to do the whole hood to feather out the rubbed spot.
There is a red rubbing compound that is more aggressive but use that as a last resort.
OK cool. That’s good advice. As I said I’m not the most patient person in the world and I just really wanted to see it on the rig! Ha!
 

EStein

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Messages
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Location
Battle Ground, Washington
Looks like a one shot paint and I don't think that is primer showing. I just gave a know it all comment on buffing. If the buffing doesn't work I have brought back some color paint with color wax. Had one lady with a red Alfa get upset after I polished her car with the wax, she thought I had painted it and was going to charge her for a paint job. If you try all the polishing and decide you will have to repaint be sure before you start any sanding to clean the hood real good with detergent and wash down with denatured alcohol. Sorry if I sound presumptuous to think you do not know something about painting in light of the beautiful job you have done so far.
Ha ha. I did not think even a little bit that you were being presumptuous. This is the first time I’ve ever done any of this so I really don’t know anything I’m just going off YouTube and the local paint supplier. I do appreciate all the replies.

So this was a single stage PPG mix 4:1:1 with reducer and Hardner. I put on three coats with about 10 minutes in between each. That’s what the instruction said. I just tried to follow everything as close as I could. Mostly really pleased except for the dust that settled in spots and all the little places that I missed… I didn’t have the best lighting and it was so hard to see where I went a little light! I’m trying not to be too critical because really this isn’t going to be a concourse restoration. I just want to be back on the road and enjoying driving again!
 

EStein

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Joined
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Messages
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Battle Ground, Washington
The hood is the hardest part to paint, I screwed mine up a little bit too. You didn't answer if this is single stage or 2 stage (base+clear)? Some single stage paints do not cut and buff well like the commercial heavy duty type, and re-shooting is the best bet. The paint should say how long until you can work with it, a week or more wait time may not be neccesary.

Also, since the primer is visible, cutting and buffing will likely not work for ya. Doing a single touch up is also out, blending is a pain. Make sure you sand the whole thing down 400-600 ish if you re-shoot so the paint can grab. Honestly afyter all you have done, its not that bad. Oh, and remove the hood this time, vertical position will help prevent stuff settling on it as it dries.

It looks great by the
The hood is the hardest part to paint, I screwed mine up a little bit too. You didn't answer if this is single stage or 2 stage (base+clear)? Some single stage paints do not cut and buff well like the commercial heavy duty type, and re-shooting is the best bet. The paint should say how long until you can work with it, a week or more wait time may not be neccesary.

Also, since the primer is visible, cutting and buffing will likely not work for ya. Doing a single touch up is also out, blending is a pain. Make sure you sand the whole thing down 400-600 ish if you re-shoot so the paint can grab. Honestly afyter all you have done, its not that bad. Oh, and remove the hood this time, vertical position will help prevent stuff settling on it as it dries.

It looks great by the way.
Yeah sorry I didn’t give a lot of information when I asked the question. I had posted it on my build page about the paint but yeah this was just an emergency help me post and I spaced it. I hadn’t thought about painting horizontally with dust settling. That’s good to know if I reshoot and also I think I will paint my doors and hard top in the vertical position. Thanks for that.
 

pb4ugo

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That'll be a great looking 40. I used the single stage omni paint system this spring when I painted my frt panels and hood. I think it was all the same stuff except for the reducer. I found it took a long time for the paint to fully cure. About a week after painting I had the hood up and resting on the windshield with a Terry cloth in between them. The hood was up for maybe a day and the cloth left a slight impression in the paint. It isn't enuff for me to do anything about it. This was my 1st real paint project also. The paint shop scanned a Freeborn red panel and mixed it. They mentioned the mix was similar to a later model Toyota color, in my case. Your 40 looks good. Let the paint rest a while.
 

EStein

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Messages
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Location
Battle Ground, Washington
That'll be a great looking 40. I used the single stage omni paint system this spring when I painted my frt panels and hood. I think it was all the same stuff except for the reducer. I found it took a long time for the paint to fully cure. About a week after painting I had the hood up and resting on the windshield with a Terry cloth in between them. The hood was up for maybe a day and the cloth left a slight impression in the paint. It isn't enuff for me to do anything about it. This was my 1st real paint project also. The paint shop scanned a Freeborn red panel and mixed it. They mentioned the mix was similar to a later model Toyota color, in my case. Your 40 looks good. Let the paint rest a while.
Thanks.. appreciate the story and the advice. I’m going to move on to some other projects and try to leave it alone. It’s gotten cold here as well which probably isn’t helping with curing the paint.
 

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