FJ60 sound proofing and carpet install (1 Viewer)

NCFJ

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I have been using a combination of Lizard Skin and Dynamat for a while now with very good results. I paint over the Lizard Skin before adding the Dynamat for much better adhesion. I'll be doing this process on my wife's truck and my own 62 as well. It is time consuming and certainly not cheap but the results are well worth it. Drive a stock 60 or 80 and then one that's had the treatment and you'll be a believer. All new door seals also makes quite a difference.
 

MoaByte

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I'm paying attention. Last week I had to replace my passenger door latch so while I was in there... Rolled on some 80 mil Kilmat to the door skin. Just one door made a difference! I plan on doing 150 mil to the floor and wheel wells.
 
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I've read differing opinions in this thread. Is Noico worth it on top of Kilmat???
In my opinion I believe it is when you consider price and results. Like others have said, I think this project is a great investment in both time in money. You get to inspect the floorboard and freshen up the interior to make the cruiser more comfortable. Whether you do lizard skin, MLV, noico, dynamat or any other brand, you will see a positive result. Just have to weight the pros and cons
 
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I have been using a combination of Lizard Skin and Dynamat for a while now with very good results. I paint over the Lizard Skin before adding the Dynamat for much better adhesion. I'll be doing this process on my wife's truck and my own 62 as well. It is time consuming and certainly not cheap but the results are well worth it. Drive a stock 60 or 80 and then one that's had the treatment and you'll be a believer. All new door seals also makes quite a difference.
I wanted to do lizard skin but just didn't have the room or tools to do it. I've heard nothing but great things about lizard skin and is probably the best way to go if you have the tools to do so! Also good point on the door seals as this is one of the next things I would like to do
 
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Okay, so I finally have the Noico and MLV down and am ready for carpet. I have a question, though. I didn't put much butyl or MLV under the driver's seat. I realize it's a bad place to do so from a noise standpoint. However, I want to put the jack and related parts back in, as stock and there is not a lot of room, especially where the handle/crank parts go.

What did everyone else do in that location?

By the way, I'm thinking I could put some foam under the driver's seat bottom cushion, i the hollow cavity area, to absorb some of the noise...
 
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I've been following this thread closely and love all of the input from everyone.

As I have already ripped out my entire interior, including headliner, quarter panels, carpet, OEM sound deadener - so I could perform rust repair and plug weld holes in the roof from the old roof rack - I am not at a state of rebuilding the truck from the ground up. Basically a poor mans' body-on restoration that is 100% DIY.

I've heard great things about Lizard Skin and ready to bite the bullet. I figure I could just use a half-way decent compressor to spray the Lizard Skin. I don't have a 50 gallon compressor, but maybe a smaller hotdog compressor could cut it for this project. I hesitate to spend $500-2000 on a compressor that I only need for this one job (yeah, I could use it for other auto work too).

Anyway - so if you have laid down Lizard Skin or other spray related sound and heat deadener - what are your thoughts on how much is required?

Headliner /Roof -
Floor (front, second row, cargo area) -
Rear Quarter Panels -
Front and Rear Doors -
Tailgate Interior ( I am building out my own storage for the tailgate right now - so its wide open for spray or Noico/Dynamat/etc) -

Based on all of that square footage, I am trying to figure out the sweet spot between spraying on stuff for sound deadening and then adding on a layer of Lizard Skin Ceramic Heat. If there are areas that the ceramic coating might not be helpful - like the trunk or quarter panels - I might just stop after the initial 40mil of Sound Deadener.

Since its pricey - I don't plan on buying extra.

I watched one of the Lizard Skin Youtube videos - where they did the interior of a Mustang and used 4 gallons of sound deadener and 4 gallons of ceramic coating. Seems that it would be almost 1.5 - 2.0 x the square footage to hit the interior of an FJ62 - since its so much larger by volume than a Mustang.

Nevertheless - its an exciting project and glad that I am at the stage of my restoration that this is my newest "problem".
 

GLTHFJ60

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You can roll/brush the lizard skin on. Not necessary to spray it.

I did the entire floor of my cruiser a number of years ago with less than half a gallon, but didn't go as thick as I could have. It's worthwhile to look into the ceramic heat shield and sound deadening products from lizard skin, spraying one then the other.

@AJR how much did you use for the truck you did? I think it was JD's 62?
 

AJR

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I just looked back, I bought 2 gal of the ceramic heat insulation, and 1 gal of sound deadening. Both LizardSkin products. I think the total was around 250, and there was some left over on each, but not enough to move down to next smallest quantity they sell. If you want to put anything like Dynamat over top of it, you'll also need to paint the Lizardskin. For the additional cost, I would highly recommend it. I used Kilmat, I think it was maybe 150 extra, that truck is super quiet inside now.
 

AJR

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8E6B156D-D4D7-400A-8A74-BA6EC477DAA4.jpeg
ACDCDA44-84FC-43D2-9DA6-CDF7D2944FD0.jpeg
 
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@AJR that interior looks like my version of a chapel.

Quiet, clean and a Land Cruiser.

Giving me some deep thinking about next steps with my build before I move onto putting the interior back together.

Appreciate the feedback @GLTHFJ60 !
 

GLTHFJ60

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Has anyone put some kind of foam/sound material on the doors where you remove the protective plastic?

I tried putting a dynamat type product there, but it was too thick, which caused issues getting the door card to stay on properly (clips would pop themselves out). I put the dynamat on the inside of the outer skin inside the door for sound deadening, and this time around probably just a cut up trashbag stuck on with butyl tape as a vapor barrier.
 

dannyvp

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I saw
I tried putting a dynamat type product there, but it was too thick, which caused issues getting the door card to stay on properly (clips would pop themselves out). I put the dynamat on the inside of the outer skin inside the door for sound deadening, and this time around probably just a cut up trashbag stuck on with butyl tape as a vapor barrier.
I saw somewhere online where a person replaced the vapor barrier with the sound foam. It’s pretty thin, not plastic thin though.
Amazon product
 

GLTHFJ60

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You really need a vapor barrier in the doors. I used to think it wasn't necessary, but it prevents condensation from forming on the outer door skin in colder months. Preventing condensation prevents rot in the door skin, and I've had to deal with a ton of rot repair because of not running vapor barriers (my current theory anyway).

I wouldn't replace the vapor barrier with that foam product unless it's closed cell.
 
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I kept the vapor barrier (well actually replaced the trashed stock material with new 6mm plastic) and added 1/8” thick Dynaliner to the back of the door cards. This coupled with Dynamat inside the door makes for an incredibly tight and quiet door.

68FFC063-D091-4D50-811C-317E7B930C73.jpeg


You can see that I left it about 2” short of the door card edge so that the extra thickness doesn’t prevent the door clips from fully seating.

-Ed
 
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I kept the vapor barrier (well actually replaced the trashed stock material with new 6mm plastic) and added 1/8” thick Dynaliner to the back of the door cards. This coupled with Dynamat inside the door makes for an incredibly tight and quiet door.

View attachment 2388105

You can see that I left it about 2” short of the door card edge so that the extra thickness doesn’t prevent the door clips from popping out.

-Ed

Ed, that’s exactly how I did my four doors, obviously you rebuilt the door cards with some wood paneling, looks sturdy.

Still have an old roll of Quietcrap I used on the outer door skin in 3 separate chunks (don’t believe in complete wallpapering coverage of sheet metal), new vapor barrier w heavy mil drop cloth material, then similar Ensolite (Dynaliner) stuck to the inside of the door cards. That stuff compresses nicely between tight panel fitting areas.

My doors close like a bank vault.
 

87CRUSR

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@AJR that interior looks like my version of a chapel.

Quiet, clean and a Land Cruiser.

Giving me some deep thinking about next steps with my build before I move onto putting the interior back together.

Appreciate the feedback @GLTHFJ60 !
I have some leftover Quietcrap I can send your way if you pay for shipping. PM me if interested.
 

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