Cooling System Refresh Tips (1 Viewer)

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I dont know if it matters on the FJ60, but as advised by many on this forum I cut the fan shroud in half on my 62. That really helps changing belts or getting to the front engine stuff. I would check all the pulley bearings while you are in there. Make sure you add sealant to the two big bottom timing cover bolts like the WSm says. Heres my homemade crank pulley tool.

20180311_131035-1-jpg.1653645




Edit: Make sure you do not tighten the front cover bolts until you have seated the crank pulley!! That is in the WSM but easy to overlook, trust me.
 

Gretsch

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OK thanks. I read that in the FSM about the sealant and front cover bolts. I am not sure I understand the front cover bolt thing but will prolly make sense once I get to that part. Like the home made tool. I don't have a welder so prolly will opt to borrow a pulley holder tool from Autozone to get the crank pulley back on.

So couple of questions on putting the crank pulley back on. First, does the woodruff key need to be removed to get the crank seal over the crank, or will the seal slide past it somehow as you put it on? Again will prolly make sense once I see it but thought I would ask here what the deal is on that. Without seeing it myself it seems like the seal would be damaged by trying to get it around that woodruff key. I am assuming here that the crank seal sits behind the key on the crank. Also, the FSM has you sort of tapping the pulley back on to get it started on the crank using an SST I think. I guess you tap it on far enough to get the nut started, and then start seating the pulley by tightening the nut. Sound right? No lubricant to get the pulley back on? Does it go on real easy or is it kind of a fight to line it up with the key and get it to get back on the crank. And the key is just sort of tapped in place? Nothing really tricky there? Also, any harm in painting the pulley once its out of the truck? Mine has some surface rust on it I would like to stop if possible by putting a coat of paint on it while I have it out of the truck.

The front of this engine sure is a busy place. All kinds of stuff going on in there. Even with the front exposed its still hard to see where everything attaches. Thanks again for the replies.
 

NeverGiveUpYota

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Crank pulley can be slid back on by hand. Initially when I patched my sheared jetway w/ jb I used my bottle jack against the frame w/ a piece of wood to push it on. Worked perfect but I think it was being held up by the jb. This past time I welded the sheared keyway, filed what was over the margins and the pulley slid right on easy. I did tho have to have a male friend come and crank down on the torque wrench cuz I’m just not tall enough nor have enough upper body weight to make the wrench click.
 
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Leave key in place. It will not hit the seal when you put the cover back on. The reason you keep the timing cover bolts loose is to allow the seal to be aligned by the pulley. Ok to paint, just dont paint the mating surface for the seal. I would lightly grease everything (crank, seal, pulley) so it slides on easy and starts off well lubed. Be gentle with the front timing cover, it is easy to bend and hard to straighten.

Seal goes around a snout on the crank pulley, it will make sense when you remove the pulley

If you want my crank tool I would be happy to mail it to you, just pm me.
 

NeverGiveUpYota

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OK thanks. I read that in the FSM about the sealant and front cover bolts. I am not sure I understand the front cover bolt thing but will prolly make sense once I get to that part. Like the home made tool. I don't have a welder so prolly will opt to borrow a pulley holder tool from Autozone to get the crank pulley back on.

So couple of questions on putting the crank pulley back on. First, does the woodruff key need to be removed to get the crank seal over the crank, or will the seal slide past it somehow as you put it on? Again will prolly make sense once I see it but thought I would ask here what the deal is on that. Without seeing it myself it seems like the seal would be damaged by trying to get it around that woodruff key. I am assuming here that the crank seal sits behind the key on the crank. Also, the FSM has you sort of tapping the pulley back on to get it started on the crank using an SST I think. I guess you tap it on far enough to get the nut started, and then start seating the pulley by tightening the nut. Sound right? No lubricant to get the pulley back on? Does it go on real easy or is it kind of a fight to line it up with the key and get it to get back on the crank. And the key is just sort of tapped in place? Nothing really tricky there? Also, any harm in painting the pulley once its out of the truck? Mine has some surface rust on it I would like to stop if possible by putting a coat of paint on it while I have it out of the truck.

The front of this engine sure is a busy place. All kinds of stuff going on in there. Even with the front exposed its still hard to see where everything attaches. Thanks again for the replies.
FYI I had all this same anxiety the first time I pulled my front end all apart. Once you do it will become clear and you’ll laugh at how much energy you wasted being anxious. It’s seriously no sweat. Like building blocks and nothing more. Just take photos. Have bags ready for each systems rubber gromets and bolts. You’ll be fine. Step back after a few hours, eat good between wrenching, drink fluids (save the beer for when your done w/ the days tasks). It doesn’t have to be done in a day. GL!
 

Gretsch

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FYI I had all this same anxiety the first time I pulled my front end all apart. Once you do it will become clear and you’ll laugh at how much energy you wasted being anxious. It’s seriously no sweat. Like building blocks and nothing more. Just take photos. Have bags ready for each systems rubber gromets and bolts. You’ll be fine. Step back after a few hours, eat good between wrenching, drink fluids (save the beer for when your done w/ the days tasks). It doesn’t have to be done in a day. GL!

Yeah you are dead on here as usual. This is actually what I am finding out already. Only a third of the way done here and its already clear that I wasted a lot of time worrying about doing this work. I was really sweating that pulley nut thing and it was all over in like 60 seconds. Silly. I do have a bit of a fear of breaking a bolt off in the block but so far everything has come out thank goodness. Only in block bolts left are the WP mounting bolts so as long as though break free I should be set.

I have purposely gone really slow here. This work was planned but because I am trying to burn PTO before end of year while doing this, the end of year sort of snuck up on me so scrambling a bit to gather last minute things I need. Had my Beno box for months. Was racing a little to get the radiator out on Saturday to get to the radiator shop before they close so they could start working on it while I tackle the front seal. I still managed to go slow enough to make sure I did not mess anything up.

One of the things I am doing with access to this area of the truck is trying to clean things up and get parts painted as I go. This adds significant time to the process. My goal here is to never have to get back in here for this as long as I own the truck so trying like hell to get this done right the first time. Its amazing though how quick you can get confused about what bolts go where. I would try to take stuff off and bag and tag it right away but sometimes I would have multiple bolts lined up on the bumper and would have to do the "now whats this one for". But yes it makes much more sense when you actually see it. The A/C condenser was a good example of that.
 

Gretsch

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Leave key in place. It will not hit the seal when you put the cover back on. The reason you keep the timing cover bolts loose is to allow the seal to be aligned by the pulley.

Seal goes around a snout on the crank pulley, it will make sense when you remove the pulley


Ah OK this makes so much more sense. Thanks for this. I am sure it will come crystal clear once I pull the pulley off as you said.

Just to be clear, when you say "just dont paint the mating surface for the seal", you mean the inside surface of the little cup built into the cover that the seal gets driven into. Sound right?

And thanks for the pulley tool offer. Much appreciated. I am going to check with some of the local auto parts stores and see if they have one of the universal pulley holder tools available I can borrow. that is assuming there is no reason one of those would not work for this application. If I cannot source one local then I may take you up on it.

Thanks again for the help. That one post cleared things up a lot with regards to how the pulley/cover/seal works.

Edit: Also wanted to ask, when you put the cover back on, you want to sort of just snug the cover bolts enough to hold it in place, but still allowing it to move some, then you seat the pulley, torque to spec which allows the pulley snout to seat into the seal, and then go back and torque the cover bolts to spec. Sound about right?
 
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Dont paint the snout of the crank pulley. I wouldnt paint the part where the seal goes in the cover, but I dont think it will make much difference either way. Paint it, then sand it off before putting in the seal.
 

Gretsch

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Dont paint the snout of the crank pulley. I wouldnt paint the part where the seal goes in the cover, but I dont think it will make much difference either way. Paint it, then sand it off before putting in the seal.

Ah OK got it. Thanks again for the help.
 

NeverGiveUpYota

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I would try to take stuff off and bag and tag it right away but sometimes I would have multiple bolts lined up on the bumper
Error #1 don’t do this. You’ve proven to yourself to this is bad. So don’t do it. Slow down. Maybe it’s cuz I’m a nurse or a mom but it’s really vital for your truck and your sanity to plan ahead. This is how I do it.

46595134-9FE5-4565-BDB6-76ADB93BE007.jpeg
 

NeverGiveUpYota

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: Also wanted to ask, when you put the cover back on, you want to sort of just snug the cover bolts enough to hold it in place, but still allowing it to move some, then you seat the pulley, torque to spec which allows the pulley snout to seat into the seal, and then go back and torque the cover bolts to spec. Sound about right?
Yes. And once the pulley is on you’ll see you’ll need to snug up the timing cover bolts w/ just a open ended wrench by feel. You won’t have room for a torque wrench and a short socket or at least I didn’t. I had to snug mine up further too just recently.
 

Gretsch

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So does anyone know how what wrench size the BVSV in the thermostat housing is? Tried 17mm but too small. Gonna try and get the housing hot tanked with radiator and wanted to remove the BVSV as not to ruin them. My truck is desmogged so no need for the valve(s). One has the vacuum hose nipples broken off anyway. Could just get a plug for it maybe but first need to get the valve out of housing. I need to get another wrench for this so just wanted to know what size I need for this.
 
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So does anyone know how what wrench size the BVSV in the thermostat housing is? Tried 17mm but too small. Gonna try and get the housing hot tanked with radiator and wanted to remove the BVSV as not to ruin them. My truck is desmogged so no need for the valve(s). One has the vacuum hose nipples broken off anyway. Could just get a plug for it maybe but first need to get the valve out of housing. I need to get another wrench for this so just wanted to know what size I need for this.

Unless your housing is really in bad shape I would just clean it real good (wire wheel) and leave the BVSV alone. Best way to get out of trouble is not to get in trouble.
 

NeverGiveUpYota

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NeverGiveUpYota,
Had no idea that you weren't supposed to paint where the seal seats. Luckily the enamel paint it very thin and I haven't seen any leaks yet.
Not that you shouldn’t, just what I chose to feel is the better precaution. To me, any mating surfaces should be clean of excess material.
 

Gretsch

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Unless your housing is really in bad shape I would just clean it real good (wire wheel) and leave the BVSV alone. Best way to get out of trouble is not to get in trouble.

BTW @emac, just took a look at your 40 series build thread. That thing is unreal. Amazing work.
 

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