1976 OEM PTO winch (1 Viewer)

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Nov 11, 2019
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Texas, Is there anyplace else??
What are you suggesting, replace the pin with a bolt? That’s a bad idea.
The sheer pin on my "stock" Toyota PTO is only 1/8" in diameter.. The metal "appears" to be cast iron.. I've sheered three pins
over the 27 years of daily driving (farm work, hunting, etc. It wasn't "babied") and the "point-of-sheer" was always as clean as
a "knife cut".. but then, the pins fit "perfectly tight".. no "slop" at all. I might add that I only use the stock Toyota Sheer Pins..
I last bought some in the mid-'90's.. cost about $2ea.. I don't know if they are still available (from the dealership) or not..
Charles 1974 FJ40.
 
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Mark Whatley (of Mud fame) years ago said you could drill out the shear pin hole and use a 1/4-20 fastener (mild) and gain a lot of pulling power. But by doing this, the force is transferred downstream to other drive train components.

I have broken a lot of shear pins trying to pull stumps and such, and agree that the factory PTO setup is very conservative on what it will pull before shearing the pin. I have no idea what force is required to shear the pin, but it was less than I would have liked. I only used OEM pins.

IMO, if you want serious pulling power, get an 8274 and skip the PTO winch.

More reading:

 
Last edited:

flx

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Jan 4, 2019
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France
On some topics I saw advice to use 70 series shear pin which is a little more resistant.
But the 70 shear pin is 5mm versus 4mm for the 40 one so I don't see how it could fit without drilling.

Putting a bolt instead of the shear pin is also losing every bit of safety on this winch. Just imagine if it engages while driving without a shear pin...
 
Joined
May 6, 2012
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71
Isn't a "kilogram" 2.2pounds?? If so, that make your "1500KG" rating ONLY 3300 Pounds!! Isn't the stock Toyota PTO Winch rated
is up around 9,000 10,000lbs... plus or minus a bit??
Charles 1974 FJ40.
according to the operator instructions for the PTO winch it said " Do not exceed the 1 1/2 ton capacity of the winch. pulling heavier loads may cause the safety pin to sear off " So there ya go
 
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Jan 17, 2007
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Finland
What are you suggesting, replace the pin with a bolt? That’s a bad idea.
I’m not suggesting anything, just telling. Bad idea or not, but it’s not very useful with the original pin in serious offroading. I’ve seen a lot of abuse, the PTO winch itself is very strong, other components can handle easily 2-3 times more than adverised with the original pin.
 
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Apr 21, 2005
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19,909
IMO, if you want serious pulling power, get an 8274 and skip the PTO winch.

Don't remember a tow using an electric winch. For serious pulling power they looking for more than once really just a beefed up starter motor. Engine doesn't over heat on long pulls. It was old CJ5 with a PTO winch and a seventies 1/2 ton chevy pickup. Jeep was a couple of teenagers were on the Rubicon. Drove until they got stuck in the snow. One kid would run out with the cable to the end of the drum. Throw it around a tree and pull the jeep. Then repeat until there were out of sight. This was in 1975. The chevy truck was early eighties. November on a elk at 8,000' north of Flagstaff. A CJ7 had slid off a forest service road and the pickup was working on getting it back on the road. It was dark and could see the lights dim every time he started to pull. Took over thirty minutes for a simple pull battery and alternator were not up to the task. Once an engine is started battery is not need. All the power an engine creates going to a PTO can't be matched by an electric winch.

I agree the shear pin is rated to break long before anything else. The pillow block bearing with the aluminum housing is a rare part to replace if it breaks. It could possibly be the next weakest link. 1/79 Toyota redesigned that to a steel housing mounted to the frame rail verses off the radiator support bracket. Not a fan possibly moving the weakest link to something other than the shear pin. Just a simple snatch block pulley can reduce the load by half. Unlike an electric winch a PTO is capable of speeding up by transmission gear or engine running faster.
 
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Somerset KY
If someone within the Toyota network can get some material specifications for the OEM shear pin I can calculate the pulling force that will shear the pin.
 

fjc-man

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Mar 21, 2014
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855
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Commerce City, Colorado
Mark Whatley (of Mud fame) years ago said you could drill out the shear pin hole and use a 1/4-20 fastener (mild) and gain a lot of pulling power. But by doing this, the force is transferred downstream to other drive train components.

I have broken a lot of shear pins trying to pull stumps and such, and agree that the factory PTO setup is very conservative on what it will pull before shearing the pin. I have no idea what force is required to shear the pin, but it was less than I would have liked. I only used OEM pins.

IMO, if you want serious pulling power, get an 8274 and skip the PTO winch.

More reading:

Steve, would you happen to know the shear/sheer pin part number?
 

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