Shauno's Chopped 200 (1 Viewer)

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I wonder how strong the frame extension is as compared to the "high strength steel" that Toyota talks about using in the 200 frame?

Looks like it could be a cool overlanding vehicle if you're not playing on rocky terrain that warrants a short wheelbase.

I have to wonder though why not start with a Tundra or even a Sequoia as the base? IIRC the Tundra is available in Australia now. (Perceived) durability I presume? I know LC parts tend to be even beefier than the Tundra/Sequoia but those vehicles are definitely not slouches
 

WCDAVE

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I wonder how strong the frame extension is as compared to the "high strength steel" that Toyota talks about using in the 200 frame?

Looks like it could be a cool overlanding vehicle if you're not playing on rocky terrain that warrants a short wheelbase.

I have to wonder though why not start with a Tundra or even a Sequoia as the base? IIRC the Tundra is available in Australia now. (Perceived) durability I presume? I know LC parts tend to be even beefier than the Tundra/Sequoia but those vehicles are definitely not slouches
Yes, curious as to the answer here. If you start with a Tundra you could do a lot of reinforcement of the frame and other components for much less than the chop I would think.

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TeCKis300

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I always thought an extended LC chassis would be a cool project. With a nice tray on the rear. And maybe drop in a Patriot box. The Aussies definitely take their cruiser utes to another level. I do agree with above that perhaps it's due to the more limited platforms they have there. The stock LC could be longer but it's obvious Toyota worked hard to keep the short wheelbase as it's been identical through the 80/100/200 series cruisers.

With Tundra availability here, I can't see the value in cutting up a 200-series. The Tundra is certainly the easier platform to start with. Maybe a nicer 1794. Surely miles cheaper! It's got some benefits between the stock longer frame, larger capacity rear axle, optional 38 gallon stock tank. It is missing key things like full time 4WD. That may be easier to retrofit with a bolt on transplant of a cruiser transfer case. No KDSS or ATRAC, but can be done old school with bolt on lockers and upgraded suspension.
 
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They don't start with the Tundra in OZ for these because the Tundra isn't available there.
Toyota doesn't sell it directly but it is available via import apparently

 
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Last I checked to road register a vehicle in Australia it has to be RHD. the frame stretch is a pretty common thing in AUS, with the 200 and the 70 series UTE.
 
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Toyota doesn't sell it directly but it is available via import apparently

Based on the prices in the article of over $100k for a RHD converted pickup, chopping a Cruiser starts to look economical :oops:
 

AussieHJCruza

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For what we pay for a Tundra here, I doubt it would be economical - a base model Ram 1500 is 80k here and that's about the cheapest US Truck we can get.

Secondly, the tundra doesn't come with a diesel which limits fuel options out in the sticks. This should be an interesting build I think...
 
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It doesn't make much sense in the US but over there it seems like one of the better options if a luxury dual cab is your thing.
Also, I'm sure he didn't pay the full price for the vehicle or the chop.
 

afgman786

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I haven't watched this video yet to know about the 200, but I know a lot of the other 200 chops are diesel. So I'd assume they do the 200s for the range and fuel availability compared to a Tundra.
 

TeCKis300

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Finally got to watch the extension in all its fascinating detail. I've always wondered how they do it. Nicely done!

The extensions reinforced and secured with spot welds is a great way to deal with these high strength steels as it minimizes heat input and the heat affected zone (HAZ) to the overall chassis. Not a light weight way to extend the frame, but that's the compromise to an aftermarket extension.
 

CharlieS

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If you've been under a tundra and a cruiser, you'd see that they're completely different frames and builds. At the most basic level, the open c channel used in the Tundra frame is a pale comparison to the fully boxed frame of the land cruiser. They also have completely different rear suspension systems. I don't think people are comparing apples to apples when trying to relate a land cruiser chop to a tundra. And I don't have anything against the tundra, they're for for a purpose, but they aren't built like a cruiser.
 
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If you've been under a tundra and a cruiser, you'd see that they're completely different frames and builds. At the most basic level, the open c channel used in the Tundra frame is a pale comparison to the fully boxed frame of the land cruiser. They also have completely different rear suspension systems. I don't think people are comparing apples to apples when trying to relate a land cruiser chop to a tundra. And I don't have anything against the tundra, they're for for a purpose, but they aren't built like a cruiser.
Easy now. Even though I completely agree with you, some folks on here think the two frames are similar.
 
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Finally got to watch the extension in all its fascinating detail. I've always wondered how they do it. Nicely done!

The extensions reinforced and secured with spot welds is a great way to deal with these high strength steels as it minimizes heat input and the heat affected zone (HAZ) to the overall chassis. Not a light weight way to extend the frame, but that's the compromise to an aftermarket extension.
Yup, pretty much how we did it on my Troopy/80 frame too. Inner sleeve into the frame, rosette welded, caps welded on top followed by the LCA bracket. Mine was only 5 inch stretch, these guys do nearly 30 inches on some projects. Bananas.

Some companies just weld extensions on and cap it, not ideal and looks sloppy.
 
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Just finished watching that video as well. I've been doing a half-assed search for companies that'll do the same in the USA for about a year (maybe more accurate to say quarter-assed). I thought having a third row would be great for occasional family trips but after the lift it's too hard for a few of the family to get into. Then I thought a drawer system would be nice but I haven't been able to devote the time or money to make the one I want. Plus, every time I hit the lumber store I dread having to pull full sheets of plywood off the roof rack. Having a tray would be much more convenient.
 
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Just finished watching that video as well. I've been doing a half-assed search for companies that'll do the same in the USA for about a year (maybe more accurate to say quarter-assed). I thought having a third row would be great for occasional family trips but after the lift it's too hard for a few of the family to get into. Then I thought a drawer system would be nice but I haven't been able to devote the time or money to make the one I want. Plus, every time I hit the lumber store I dread having to pull full sheets of plywood off the roof rack. Having a tray would be much more convenient.
As was said above, there are better options out there in the US. That said, I'd love to see it happen in the US.
Just because something doesn't make sense, doesn't mean it wouldn't be fun, interesting and something different than the usual.
After the comet hits the ice caps and the sun blasts a solar flare into half the earth, we'll all be dead anyways.
Or I've been listen to too much Alex Jones.
They're making the frogs gay btw.
 
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I told my wife the other day that if I ever get promoted to executive where I work (one grade level to go, but the hardest), I'm sending a US-spec 200 to Oz for a 6x6 conversion, just so I can park it in the vicinity of all the rarified sports cars and luxo boxes that my future peers drive! :) Her (jaded) response was "as long as it's not mine that you butcher, knock yourself out".... She didn't confident in the eventual promotion! :)
 
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I was hoping someone would do that to my truck, so I can mount a camper on the back of it. Hope some day someone can convert my LC into the look of EarthRoamer just with LC.
 

CharlieS

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Just finished watching that video as well. I've been doing a half-assed search for companies that'll do the same in the USA for about a year (maybe more accurate to say quarter-assed). I thought having a third row would be great for occasional family trips but after the lift it's too hard for a few of the family to get into. Then I thought a drawer system would be nice but I haven't been able to devote the time or money to make the one I want. Plus, every time I hit the lumber store I dread having to pull full sheets of plywood off the roof rack. Having a tray would be much more convenient.
I suspect this would cost a few bucks more than adding a drawer system to your cruiser and buying a small trailer to haul sheet goods, etc. Tundra crewmaxes might be a reasonable compromise too (if you are in a country that imports them).
 
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