Removing a stripped torx head bolt (1 Viewer)

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Sep 21, 2007
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Simple but big problem...I stripped a torx head bolt. I am trying to get it out! What is the easiest way to get that POS bolt out? Need help fast because I cannot mount my new roofrack until the bolt and old mount is out:bang:
 

2mbb

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what type of bolt is it? socket head or counter sunk? vicegrips around the outside of a socket head is probably the easiest, or try chiseling it off. If the head is counter sunk you may need to drill it out or try and cut a straight slot in the head with a dremel tool, then use something like an impact driver to get it out--assuming the impact won't dent the roof, etc.

Before you try the next time you should try soaking the threads in penetrating oil. sometimes it also helps to first try and tighten the bolt, to break free the corrosion before loosening.
 

spotcruiser

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If you can do it without damage, weld a nut onto the end of it and turn it out with a wrench. The heat of welding alone helps free up the bolt.
 

tag3

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If it is a button head, file on opposite sides of the head and vice grip it out. Use a reverse cut drill bit and drill head off, sometimes the bolt will catch the bit and come out.
 
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Bought some extractors this evening, going to work on the pos bolt tomorrow morning! A harbor freight tools finally opened in my area! Another quick question, what brand drill bits do you guys use to drill metal surfaces? For example, when needing to drill a fog light mounting hole onto an aftermarket metal bumper

Thanks again!
 

Bogo

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If you have to drill it out, get a set of left hand drill bits. Often when I end up needing to drill something out, it will back it's self out part way through drilling it out. Use cutting lube when drilling or you will kill the drill bits.
 

scottm

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Plenty of better ideas, but in a pinch I've used a prick punch to drive the head around. I suspect the tapping does more to loosen it than the rotational force. Whack it with a hammer, it'll at least make you feel better.
 

e9999

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I try not to use easy outs, too problematic from what I've read, let alone some Easyout clone that one would get at HF... :eek:

the extractors that go on the outside of bolt heads seem much safer than the drill and screw in kind, though
 
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I try not to use easy outs, too problematic from what I've read, let alone some Easyout clone that one would get at HF... :eek:

the extractors that go on the outside of bolt heads seem much safer than the drill and screw in kind, though
Never had a bad experience with one. In this case you don't even have to drill, the extractor will fit in the torx hole. Doesn't get much easier, unless you happen to have an impact gun to use with the extractor. Easy peasey.
 
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Consider yourself lucky. When you do about the only thing you can do is spend hours with a series of diamond bits and a Dremel trying to remove the broken off piece of easy-out. The tool steel they use is so hard that regular drill bits won't even touch it. The way they break (or at least this has been my experience) is that they leave a chunk of themselves stuck exactly where you'd want them not to be if you had to resort to plan B (drilling straight through the screw to extract it). I will never ever ever ever ever use them again.
 
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EZ outs are the devil.

With so many other easy options I just dont see how they got ther name "EZ OUT". they should be called "EZ brake, now you fawked"

Once an ez out brakes you are screwed.

EZ outs and Heli coils are for positive thinking clueless folks.
 
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EZ outs are the devil.

With so many other easy options I just dont see how they got ther name "EZ OUT". they should be called "EZ brake, now you fawked"

Once an ez out brakes you are screwed.

EZ outs and Heli coils are for positive thinking clueless folks.
I walked in to our local machinist with an aluminum timing cover and said, "I broke a bolt." He said, OK, no problem. "I then broke an EZ out inside the broken bolt." He said, "You poor, dumb kid. I've got you over a barrel, now, you know. I'm your last hope. You better pray you drilled straight, and didn't get into the threads, or you're really screwed." He was super cool, only charged me a few bucks to weld a little piece to the tiny bolt and get it out... he just wanted me to know. :) Word around town is that he's apparently the guy that the Navy flies in when somebody's working on a submarine and says something can't be done.
 

e9999

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ah, it turns out I just broke the bolt that holds the mandrel on one of my drills.... don't ask... :rolleyes:

Only a bit of uneven stub left. No dice with visegrips. So dremeled a slot in there. Bit of PB blaster, came right out with a screwdriver. (Although admittedly not highly torqued in there probably.) Even if broken flush, sometimes there is enough meat around the hole, that you can still grind a slot even if it cuts a bit into the surrounding area.




I'd try anything before an EZout.
 
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Apr 18, 2012
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Yay! I tried something different and it worked: I couldn't get the stripped bolt off the pump mounted to the mounting bracket, no matter how much horizontal pressure I was trying to apply in the tight space under the hood, so I finally took the entire mounting bracket off and placed the whole assembly on my counter. (I needed to re-use the mounting bracket, so needed to get the pump off of its mounting). The head was pretty stripped by this point, but I thought "what the heck, one more try". I figured rubber might add friction, so I placed a double-fold of rubber over the bit, with a small tear in the end to ensure the bit hit the bottom of the head, as deep as it could go. I tapped the bit in, made sure there was no bit wiggle with enough added rubber in there, and then leaned with all my weight onto the bit (i.e. full vertical pressure) and cranked 'er, while my son held the pump. It worked! Sweet victory!
 

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