Recommendations for Gas or Electric Pole Saw

a31gun

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I have to chime in here. I own a ranch with 8000 pecan trees. We harvest up to 150k lbs a year. I do A LOT of pole sawing.
Shindawa P231 has been the best saw I've ever used. We have a pair of them from 1999. Both still run like new and they get used often. As well as a 45cc Shindawa chainsaw from 99 still running like a top.

My personal saw is an Echo. (No complaints either, but new)
 

KLF

Frame waxer
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So the only way to buy a Stihl product is through a brick 'n mortar dealer? I see no on-line sales?
That is intentional, and I think it's a great idea. Protect your dealer network, and they will stay loyal.

Two Stihl products in my house, I won't buy anything else for power equipment from now on.
 

PAToyota

Keystone Cruisers
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My reluctance for a battery unit is without maintenance the batteries die.

[snip]

@D'Animal - what do you recommend for a homeowner gas unit that will see use maybe 4 times a year?
I'm a Stihl fan as well, but have to admit that the infrequent use of some (traditionally) gasoline tools has me looking at battery operated ones rather than dealing with the fuel-related maintenance issues. It's one thing if I use it regularly for a season and then "winterize" it until the next season, but something that gets used randomly a few times a year really has me looking at battery power for those items. My solution is a system that has a variety of tools with interchangeable batteries so that I'm at least using the batteries regularly if not the tool itself. For a variety of reasons - including a buddy with the system as well, so we can exchange tools - I went with the DeWalt 20V line. I'm not seeing a pole trimmer in their lineup, but just something to consider.

Even with the "boutique" fuel, I'd still dump/run any extra fuel out, blow out the lines, and fully clean it up before putting it away for any amount of time.
 

flintknapper

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Echo PPF 225 here. I've used the devil out of mine for the last 5-6 years.

I had concerns about it being powerful enough...but not to worry. With a sharp chain it will cut 10" limbs without missing a beat. I got the 12" bar on mine and purchased a 3' extension (I've only had to use the extension once).

Its starts so easily and is absolutely rugged. I use it for much more than trimming limbs up above. It also lets you reach into areas (downed tree tops, thick brush, cut saplings next to the ground) that you would otherwise have to cut your way into with a normal chainsaw.

'Stihl' products are certainly good, no arguing that. My issue with Stihl is that they hold you hostage with respect to purchasing their products and parts. I live in a Rural area 20+ miles from the nearest town and there is a single Stihl dealer there. I'll be damned if I will be forced to buy products from a dealer. I can get Echo parts online, shipped right to my house. I am plenty capable of maintaining and repairing my own equipment if need be.

But back to the saws: Either one will serve you well if you are a non-professional and not using them everyday...all day.

A bit of advice to the wise: You can cut a LOT of limbs in a short amount of time with these things. It's incredible how much wood you can put on the ground in just 30 minutes. So be sure to factor in 'clean up time' (removing it all) into your work schedule. It is all too easy to cut for minutes ...but take the rest of the day to haul it all off.

I simply could not maintain my property without a good polesaw and brushcutter (Echo PPF-225 & Echo SRM410U).

 

flintknapper

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A couple of situations where a polesaw comes in handy that probably won't apply to the average homeowner, but will to many property owners:

1. Downed trees (storm damaged or blow downs) often land such they have limbs under heavy tension. A polesaw lets you cut these from a safe distance.

2. Heavy leaners: If the integrity of the trunk is in question at all...I will face cut, then plunge cut (creating your hinge), then cut toward the back of the tree leaving a little holding wood 'trigger'. Then use my polesaw to release the 'trigger' from 8' away. So even if the trunk splits out...you aren't right there at it.
 
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Grande Prairie, Alberta
Gasoline small engines are mostly going the way of the dinosaur, VHS tape, and fax machine for the small homeowner.

I use the mighty Milwaukee M18/M12 impacts, cordless ratchets at home. I also have a M18 weed trimmer that seems to have an orderable polesaw attachment. It wouldn't be very long or extremely powerful though. If you have more than a few acres, gas is probably for you. There is even a M18 chainsaw out this year.

My lawnmower is Husqvarna cordless too. No fuel to mix, no carb to gum and clean. Only one moving part, not a dozen moving parts as an engine has.

My snowblower is new, and has a large four-stroke gasoline engine. No li-ion option there.
 
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