Project Guidance, fixing a Bunch O Stuff (1 Viewer)

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Looks like your well prepared. Go for it!

I also got the cable kit from forerunner and was looking at what it was going to take to put in last night. Instead of undoing all the nicely wrapped wire loom im thinking of just cutting and capping the main leads to be replaced as close to the wrapping as I can. Then install the new cable kit and zip tying to the outside of the loom where needed. Most of the ground cable can just come out and go in. Let me know what your thoughts are.


I'll let you know how it goes and will probably be adding to this thread during and after
 
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Nice list and you'll be glad to have it as a rough guide as you proceed. A few thoughts came to mind when reading it:

3. I'd keep the front bumper on to avoid one more task and to use as a place to stand at some parts of the process. Bumper off plus the right step/stool(s) could be best but I just wouldn't want to deal with the extra hassle unless there is another reason to take the bumper off, like rust treatment or something. So my only thought was It might give room but I think your thought is better for a place to stand and put stuff
9. I'm not sure the PS will bleed without the motor running but could be wrong and it doesn't matter anyway. You can fill it and move on then come back to topping it up once the engine's running. I don't typically follow the "bleeding procedure" and just watch to keep the reservoir topped up for a few days as I'm going to be checking all fluids for a few days after work like this anyway. Okay, I'll probably just fill as much as I can finish when it's buttoned up. Have you ever drained the entire system and removed the hoses with the drive and check method? Anyway, I can prime the components as I install them? Don't want to mess anything up is all.
16a. The problem with tap water is that it can be mineral rich. Those minerals or whatever in the water can fall out and leave deposits/scaling/build up over time and can increase the conductivity of the coolant which leads to increased internal corrosion. Gotcha, need to figure out a way to stay away from the hose then....
16b. In order to try to get it all out before that happens I've started using a shop vac. I reverse the flow of the shop vac so that it's a low pressure, high-volume blower and then stick that into different passages of the cooling system and allow it to blow for a while in each. You could also do this with vacuum once it starts to get more dry. You can leave this in the upper rad. hose blowing into the block for some time while it dries the block out. I'm not sure how much water is left behind after blowing but if you combine blowing with a follow up distilled water fill/drain there should be very little tap water left. this is an awesome tip, but I don't have a shop vac... I do have a small leaf blower and I guess that could work to dry it out. Would it be BEST to flush the block with distilled water from the top rad hose??? the radiator its self will be out at that point and I don't want to introduce the new one to the old block stuff.
16c. I'll also add that if you use the 50/50 premix you can adopt a similar maintenance practice that I follow and think has some value. Every Spring I loosen the rad cap and then pop an end of a lower radiator hose off. This drops right at 2 gallons of coolant out of the cooling system. While it's draining I remove the overflow tank (just lift it straight up) then flush and clean it. I also remove the rad. cap and clear out the ports (below the little metal flapper valve) with a water hose and clean up the overflow lines/cap. I then put it all back together, refill and handle my other spring maintenance items. In short, this is an easy way to do a partial coolant change and to clear out the easy to access system areas. Total coolant capacity is just over 3.5 gallons I think so with this annual drop/fill I'm changing about half of the fluid. My 80 had some rust inside the cooling system when I bought it and multiple flushes/vinegar soaks/etc. didn't get it all out. Every year there is still some rust residue in the overflow tank when I do this process and early on the rad cap was getting clogged periodically. In cases where you have a dirty cooling system a maintenance practice like this may be a good way to use time and heat cycles to continue to clear out the system. Thanks for the tip, I plan on doing this every year and have owned the 80 or almost 10 years but I've finally gotten settled in a new job and plan on giving the 80 some seriously deserved attention so she lasts as long as some of the super high mile ones on this board have. I really appreciate the input and help 👍!
 
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I've filled a "dry" power steering system on my 80 two times now. The first is when I bought it. Picture a very neglected, undriveable 80 that was being used as a storage shed. I got it driving but it had no power steering, etc. etc. Once driving I left the sellers driveway and headed straight to a parts store where I started inspecting/prepping for a 120 mile trip home (adventure). The PS system was apparently bone dry and probably had been for years. I filled it up, it started working, and had no issue besides a small leak at the pump until I rebuilt/replaced pump/lines/etc. a few months later. After I rebuilt (resealed) the pump and replaced lines I just filled, cycled the steering a bit, topped off the fluid and moved on. I don't recommend not doing the official bleed, it's easy so why not. My real goal is just to make this seems less of a big deal or less risky. If there's oil in the system and you don't run the pump dry I think it will work itself out, and even if you run the pump dry it can apparently survive :)

I also wouldn't worry too much about tap water. For the first few decades of doing mech. work I would sometimes use tap, rain or other water sources like creek water :) in cooling systems as needed. Tap water in your cooling system for a short time is not really a big deal and the mineral levels are very minimal considering some sources, especially after draining and dilution with whatever you add next. As an extreme example, I ran a raw water cooled engine in a salt-water boat for years. After 50 years (not all under my care) that engine is still running great without a major overhaul which is not unusual. Every few years I would backflush the block to get the boiler scale out and move on. Granted there was no aluminum head involved etc. but still, tap water is very clean in comparison to coastal salt water. The good thing is understanding why tapwater can cause problems so that you can avoid them.

I assume blowing the block out with the leaf blower after your flush would get most water out. If you want to try to pour distilled into the upper rad hose to fill the block to dilute any residual tap water that may not be a bad idea. If it were me I'd consider doing the flush after everything is back together. Then you can flush the block and follow that up with a fill of distilled water that you run for a day or two. After that you can again do a full drain and blow out followed by a proper coolant fill. etc. Without knowing how dirty your cooling system is though it's hard to say exactly what I'd do. A water-hose flush through block (in/out through all available ports) and through your heater cores (both directions) seems prudent to try to keep chunks out of your new radiator. I'm assuming you don't need much more than that but if you do vinegar or other mild acids can help. Further, if you are at all concerned with how clean the coolant/system is after your efforts you can just do more frequent drain/refills until what drains out is very clean. etc.

With all of the above said, I'll add that I'm afraid I'm adding to the ih8mud tendency to overthink things. These are two areas (power steering fluid, coolant change) that are hard to go wrong with as long as you put the right liquids in when you fill the systems up.
 
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I really appreciate the advice and you brought up another good point the heater cores.. I've deleted the rear heater under the passenger seat so does that change things? I get what you are saying about doing this when its back together but I just assumed it would be better not to introduce old nasty fluid to a new radiator but I could be wrong (it happens often)
 
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I agree with your assumption. By doing the flushing when it's all "back together" I roughly meant that I'd flush it before you pump gunk into the radiator but after the rad is back in so that you can quickly follow your flush with a full fill and run with distilled. So, "back together" means parts in place and engine ready to run but radiator not plumbed in. Quickly following your pressure flushes up with filling up the system with distilled water then letting it run for a while will do a much better job of diluting any remnant tap water, etc. before a final drain/fill than just pouring distilled into available hoses and hoping it gets to the areas the pressurized tap water got to. Waiting on the flush also avoids a scenario where work gets delayed and then tap water sits in the block and evaporates (which will deposit it's contents in your system). If you flush then fill quickly there isn't as much risk of evaporation.

This is all splitting hairs really and just pointing at what I think makes sense as an ideal approach in a situation where most options you can think of will be more than adequate.
 
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:cool:👍 gotcha! I'm really looking forward to some wrench therapy as work is a :censor: nightmare at the moment!

Plus I got to buy new tools although I don't know where else I will use a 4ft long 600 ft/lb torque wrench, but I got it if I need it. Now I got to look for a shop vac lol.
 
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Getting ready for a hot day tomorrow but happy to get started

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Well I got it off but thats doesn't seem right, if anyone could provide input on that I'd appreciate it. The new belt is about the same size but without teeth

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What seems off, or what's the question?

The notched belt isn't original equipment and could easily have been a touch small. Try the new, correct belt to see how it actually fits. It won't be easy/possible to eyeball a small but relevant size difference between the two.
 
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Did you unlock the idler pulley first before adjusting? It'll get plenty loose once adjusted.
So I followed the steps in your diagram and the pully moved up and wasnt touching the belt at all but the belt was super tight. I have to pry it off with a screw driver.... did I miss something???
 
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What seems off, or what's the question?

The notched belt isn't original equipment and could easily have been a touch small. Try the new, correct belt to see how it actually fits. It won't be easy/possible to eyeball a small but relevant size difference between the two.
I guess the question is the belt supposed to be that tight with the adjustment pulls at full slack. It didn't seem right.
 
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Attached the wrong one above. This is the problem child. Also in my pic above the adjustment pully is removed completely so why is the belt so damn tight ??????

AC-belt-adjusting-vector.png
 

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