Is the Land Cruiser officially dead? (1 Viewer)

Joined
Dec 21, 2015
Messages
243
Location
PA
No other automaker of repute sends their flagships for overseas production. You can always bet the Lexus LS and the Landcruiser nameplates will be made in Japan.

BMW makes the M3 and M5 in Germany. VW makes the Golf R in Germany even if GTIs are made elsewhere. Mercedes makes the S class in Germany, while the C class is made here. Nissan makes the GTR in Japan. Porsche makes the 911 in Germany while the Boxster/Cayman are made in other factories (one generation in Finland).
 
Joined
Apr 20, 2013
Messages
937
Location
Seattle, WA / Homer, AK / Reykjavik, IS
No other automaker of repute sends their flagships for overseas production. You can always bet the Lexus LS and the Landcruiser nameplates will be made in Japan.

BMW makes the M3 and M5 in Germany. VW makes the Golf R in Germany even if GTIs are made elsewhere. Mercedes makes the S class in Germany, while the C class is made here. Nissan makes the GTR in Japan. Porsche makes the 911 in Germany while the Boxster/Cayman are made in other factories (one generation in Finland).
The LC200 is also made in China. Just not for the US market. My Mercedes G65 (sold) was built in Austria. My Seattle neighbor’s Bentley Bentayga was built in Slovakia. So is the Porsche Cayenne Turbo. It depends. As long as they work i could not give a crap where they are built.
 
Joined
Mar 24, 2016
Messages
2,448
Location
Texas
I thought having the Tacoma built in the Texas plant was a good thing but they sure did have a lot of issues when the 3rd Gen first came out. I agree that the country of origin of manufacture doesn't bother me all that much, hell my Power Wagon was built entirely in Mexico and it was no different than my $80K Super Duty which was built in Kentucky.
 

Idaho Savage

GOLD Star
Joined
Mar 9, 2017
Messages
407
Location
Idaho
If you're a business dork like me, read up on the history of Toyota's supply chain. It'll explain why Toyota starters often outlive the motor, why common replacement items on domestic trucks simply don't die in LCs.
 

bloc

SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 19, 2008
Messages
6,667
Location
Central Texas
I know the Diesel offered overseas has a good base of 4.5 L to work with, but it's also turbocharged. So why wouldn't we expect the 300 series to have a robust 3.5 turbo that can do the 25 year harsh service life?

It seems like we think that Toyota will yank an LS500 engine out and drop it in the 300 with no modifications. They might even add port injection like they did for the Toybaru twins.
You really can’t compare Diesel engine longevity to gasoline. The compression ratios and nature of the mechanical forces often dictate different block materials, connecting rod cross sections, bearing surface areas, lower average RPMs, and a host of other things that simply make an engine last longer.
 
Joined
Aug 2, 2009
Messages
2,635
Location
Illinois and Alaska
You really can’t compare Diesel engine longevity to gasoline. The compression ratios and nature of the mechanical forces often dictate different block materials, connecting rod cross sections, bearing surface areas, lower average RPMs, and a host of other things that simply make an engine last longer.
Are mainstream diesels from the big 3(Cummins/Powerstroke/Duramax) really lasting that much longer than 2UZs and 3URs?
 

bloc

SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 19, 2008
Messages
6,667
Location
Central Texas
Are mainstream diesels from the big 3(Cummins/Powerstroke/Duramax) really lasting that much longer than 2UZs and 3URs?
I should have been more specific, can't compare them to new generation gasoline direct injected turbocharged engines.

But since you asked, it also isn't apples to apples. On average those big 3 diesels are doing a lot more hard work over their lifespan, and usually there is no debate which platform to go with for true heavy duty use, between actually handling the duty cycle and doing so efficiently. Point being, if we used a 2UZ like the average cummins 5.9, it wouldn't last anywhere near as long as they usually do.

Another question is whether you want to include the emissions equipment in the overall durability equation. For the purposes of comparing modern diesels to GDI-T engines much of that stuff won't be on the gas engine, however it does ultimately cause downtime for many diesels. But, minus that stuff, the foundation of the engine and injection technology could make for an extremely powerful, reliable, efficient, long lasting package. But smog sucks, so...
 

Idaho Savage

GOLD Star
Joined
Mar 9, 2017
Messages
407
Location
Idaho
Care to share a link?
This is an interesting start and I'll see if I can find a good summary of their model that basically sourced from family owned manufacturers. Instead of manufacturing alternators, they'd put out the design to Japanese manufacturers that would then compete to build the best alternator and win the contract.


Just as notable was the pioneering of "just in time manufacturing" (lean) which revolutionized the process. They were obsessed with both waste and inefficiency. Lean manufacturing and a crazy commitment to process solved both.
 

Attachments

  • Mac_TPS_thesis.pdf
    743.1 KB · Views: 15

bloc

SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 19, 2008
Messages
6,667
Location
Central Texas
This is an interesting start and I'll see if I can find a good summary of their model that basically sourced from family owned manufacturers. Instead of manufacturing alternators, they'd put out the design to Japanese manufacturers that would then compete to build the best alternator and win the contract.


Just as notable was the pioneering of "just in time manufacturing" (lean) which revolutionized the process. They were obsessed with both waste and inefficiency. Lean manufacturing and a crazy commitment to process solved both.
I believe @Onur has written about this in the past. Interesting stuff.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top Bottom